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smithgn

Palm that I planted is a bit crooked... Meh

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smithgn

I've been resisting the urge for the past few weeks, telling myself I have enough plants and palms this growing season, but I gave in and purchased a ~4 foot tall Livistona Chinensis and planted it yesterday. After spending more time than I probably should have, meticulously planting my new palm and mixing/spreading the soil, I finally stood back and took a look at it.

It looked great, but it was just a tad, tad crooked. The plant is not straight up or down, as positioned in the soil. No casual observer would probably notice this, but I do.

My question is, will a palm eventually "straighten out" after a few years of growing? Or will it forever stay in this kind of crooked position? It's not a big deal, and if it was, I'd just dig it back and re-position it, but I suppose it's a big enough deal that I thought I should post this question on here (Haha). So what do y'all think?

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Ben in Norcal

I realize I'm not answering your question, but if it bothers you I'd just straighten it up now. Should be easy enough.

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smithgn

I guess I'm going more for an experimental thing now. Like I said, I'll probably be the only person to notice it- but was just curious. I'm just going to monitor it.

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akamu

A lot of hotels plant palms at angles to get that curved look because they naturally straighten them selves out.

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Will

dig it out and straighten it up, or it will bother you every time you look at it.

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BS Man about Palms

If there is no trunk you would likely never be able to tell in the future..

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Pando

just remove some soil around the root ball and push it straight, then fill the space at the other side. Shouldn't be that hard unless it's *really* crooked, in which case see opthamologist.

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empireo22

leave it alone. not worth the effort. im guessing it has no trunk and by the time it starts trunking it will be straight.

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Zeeth

If it has no trunk it'll grow straight after a while.

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Patrick

Yep, it'll straighten out on its own.

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Jim in Los Altos

I wouldn't mess with it either. It will grow out of its slant. Do you have a picture of this palm you can post? If it's under canopy,it may grow at a slight slant towards brighter light.

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MattyB

Dude, you could lay that thing on its side and it'll straighten itself out.

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smithgn

Matty- Lol Good to know. Thanks all. Like I said, not a big deal, but was just wondering. I almost forgot but I did take a few post planting pictures in a rush. They're anything but glamorous. Here's a few shots, one that displays the very slight crookedness of the palm.

You can barely tell in this pic. It's leaning away from the point at which I'm taking the picture. Barely noticeable. Oh, and please excuse the massive amounts of fricken clay. I still don't know what to do with it all. I added a bit in with the amendments I added to try and keep it mixed, but still have tons of it left over. Any of you all in California care for any?

011_zps95ee3f2b.jpg

Here's one more, you can tell its slanted actually a little better in this picture. It was planted on a very slight slope.

012_zpsa01d80d9.jpg

As you all can probably tell, the spot I picked is a bit cramped. Far to the left I have some elephant ears planted that just started sprouting. Its the best microclimate I have in my backyard. Trying to make due with what little room I have mixed in with the good amount of sunshine this area sees.

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smithgn

just remove some soil around the root ball and push it straight, then fill the space at the other side. Shouldn't be that hard unless it's *really* crooked, in which case see opthamologist.

I started to do this afterwords to a lesser extent, tried adjusting it a bit. Realized it wasn't a big deal really and it looked a little better after this so I let it be. EIther I need to see an ophthalmologist or a psychologist that deals with OCD.

I wouldn't mess with it either. It will grow out of its slant. Do you have a picture of this palm you can post? If it's under canopy,it may grow at a slight slant towards brighter light.

I actually have a spot in my yard that Is under 3 pine trees with great soil. Although, this area receives sparse light and it would be a little more exposed to those northerly winds. I wanted it to receive more light so I could get a more compact crown and hopefully a taller tree. Although, I don't know if sunlight has anything to do with the height of a chinensis.

Edited by smithgn

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Palmdude

They grow nicely but slow in the shade. Bigger deeper green leaves and long stretched out petioles :)

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Jim in Los Altos

They grow nicely but slow in the shade. Bigger deeper green leaves and long stretched out petioles :)

Yes, they look much better shade grown. All day sun will yellow the leaves. Plant another one under your pines and watch the different growth they exhibit.

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rprimbs

Straight palms are boring.

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Kumar

Nice to see a short-petioled chinensis. Why do you trim the leaf edges, Do they get in the way?

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Jim in Los Altos

Nice to see a short-petioled chinensis. Why do you trim the leaf edges, Do they get in the way?

Kumar, lot's of us don't like the look of brown tipped palm leaves so we trim off the dry, brown tips.

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smithgn

They grow nicely but slow in the shade. Bigger deeper green leaves and long stretched out petioles :)

Yes, they look much better shade grown. All day sun will yellow the leaves. Plant another one under your pines and watch the different growth they exhibit.

I've heard this. What's funny, is the guy that I bought it from had one left. You may be onto something Jim... It would make for a fun experiment over the years.

Nice to see a short-petioled chinensis. Why do you trim the leaf edges, Do they get in the way?

Pretty much what Jim said. I bought this palm from a nursery and apparently the guy that had it trimmed the tips off. I don't mind it, but at the same time if it were me, I'd probably just leave it. But it does look neater.

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_Keith

Agree with all, nowhere near trunking and it will straighten up on its own, BUT, it will be in a couple of years. That is a tough palm, so if you don't want to look at a palm that bothers you for a couple of years, dig out a few shovels on the leaning side. Use the shovel as pry bar and lift it to level and toss in some dirt in new opening to keep it level. 10 minute operation.

As for shade or sun, in our clay soils and lots of rain, they don't yellow in the sun. But in shade or sun it can almost look like 2 different palms. Both are attractive. There is one distinct advantage of shade though, and this less winter foliage damage.

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Kumar

Nice to see a short-petioled chinensis. Why do you trim the leaf edges, Do they get in the way?

Kumar, lot's of us don't like the look of brown tipped palm leaves so we trim off the dry, brown tips.

Jim, my question then is ... does not the trimming only shift the "brown zone" inwards? I have sometimes noticed this on L chinensis (and they it seems to be the only palmate palm that gets trimmed in this manner) that the brown part, which I'm presuming is dead leaf tissue again starts forming along the trimmed edge. It can be seen in the bottom right of the second photo.

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smithgn

Update: So I've left my palm crooked. After all, it isn't that bad and plus it'll be interesting to see it straighten out over the years. But with that said, to help my Livistona cope with the future winter, I bought some lava rocks to absorb warmth during the day. They've also helped with my soil runoff since I'm planted at a bit of a slope. But does anyone know if lava rocks absorb less heat due to being less dense as other rocks? It's too warm right now to really notice but was just wondering if anyone else has used lava rocks? Or any other alternatives? Aesthetically they're pleasing and they're fine for now. But some denser rocks for the winter time will probably be a wise investment later on this year.

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