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stevethegator

"Common" Palms in habitat

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stevethegator

Growing up in a tropical (or not depending on who you ask) climate in South Florida, palms were ubiquitous. You see queens, sabals, royals, and cocos down there and go, "not again!"

It wasn't until I moved to north Florida and then Atlanta that I really began to appreciate palms, and the common queen in Gainesville or the odd sabal in Atlanta turned into showpieces. And of course, all palms look better in habitat.

So here it goes, let's appreciate what we have by showing those lowly "common" species in their full glory!

I'll start:

Sabal palmetto along the St. John's river, somewhere northeast of Oviedo, FL

post-3209-0-32046200-1395959747_thumb.jp

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Sabal Steve

Yes!

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Neil C

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (Mount Mee National park, SE Queensland)

post-6795-0-16170000-1396007306_thumb.jp

Regards Neil

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stevethegator

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (Mount Mee National park, SE Queensland)

p6.jpg

Regards Neil

Beautiful! I love how the palm trunk in the very front is coming through the boardwalk

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Tobias Valentin

Common palms in natural habitat?

I have something for you.

As common as it is in culture, the Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis) is rare in the wild.
Last year, I had the honor of visiting true natural CIDP habitat, in a dramatic canyon, one of the species' last strongholds in the wild.

Pictures of habitat: http://tobiasvalentin.dk/?p=311

post-9319-0-87690700-1396037716_thumb.jp

Edited by Tobias Valentin

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stevethegator

Wow thanks Tobias, those pictures were beautiful! How come P. canaries is populations are declining in habitat.?

Keep them coming folks, common is a relative term. Common palms in one place are treasures in another

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Will

Washingtonia filifera in Palm Canyon, Palm Springs, CA.

post-332-0-21990000-1396103778_thumb.jpg

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gilles06

I love your pics in the wild.

Here is one of phoenix theophrastii in Crete (prevelli)

831825DSCN1439.jpg

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stevethegator

Great pictures guys! I love those Washingtonia oases, someday I'd like to see them in person.

P. theophrastii looks like it enjoys the water, growing right next to the river like that!

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stevethegator

Here's a cool one I found on google, Wodyetia bifurcata, Cape Melville, Australia.

post-3209-0-03183000-1396114519_thumb.jp

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Richard Booth

Great topic.

'Friad I can't really contribute as we have no native palms in the uk but I'm enjoying the photos.

Please keep them coming

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Brett in Mission Viejo

More Washingtonia Filifera, Palm Canyon, Borrego Springs, CA

Borrego2003026_zpsd126c65a.jpeg

Borrego2003018_zpsfb8269b3.jpeg

Borrego2003027_zps8fad0fce.jpeg

Borrego2003017_zpsa03c0dfe.jpeg

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Tobias Valentin

Wow thanks Tobias, those pictures were beautiful! How come P. canaries is populations are declining in habitat.?

Thanks.

The reason is loss of habitat. Agriculture and urban sprawl.

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Brad Mondel

Rhapidophyllum Hystrix looks natural in this photo: :mrlooney:

post-3527-0-43725000-1396141502_thumb.jp

Edited by ArchAngeL01

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Explorer

Common palms in natural habitat?

I have something for you.

As common as it is in culture, the Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis) is rare in the wild.

Last year, I had the honor of visiting true natural CIDP habitat, in a dramatic canyon, one of the species' last strongholds in the wild.

Pictures of habitat: http://tobiasvalentin.dk/?p=311

Well on Gran Canaria I have seen plenty good populations last winter. At moist places in barrancos. Also close to human habitation. So not that rare. But a problem is inbreeding with the introduced Phoenix dactylifera! So other Phoenix should be best kept away from wild Phoenix canariensis stands.

Alexander

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PalmnutVN

Trachycarpus (not sure about the species) Darjeeling, India

post-6682-0-75769900-1396179468_thumb.jp

Licuala bachmaensis: My Son, Vietnam

These palms are one of several Licualas used to make the ubiquitous 'non la' (conical hat)

post-6682-0-76054600-1396179484_thumb.jp

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Tobias Valentin

Common palms in natural habitat?

I have something for you.

As common as it is in culture, the Canary Island Date Palm (Phoenix canariensis) is rare in the wild.
Last year, I had the honor of visiting true natural CIDP habitat, in a dramatic canyon, one of the species' last strongholds in the wild.

Pictures of habitat: http://tobiasvalentin.dk/?p=311

Well on Gran Canaria I have seen plenty good populations last winter. At moist places in barrancos. Also close to human habitation. So not that rare. But a problem is inbreeding with the introduced Phoenix dactylifera! So other Phoenix should be best kept away from wild Phoenix canariensis stands.

Alexander

Please, can you show us some pictures from these moist canyons - would be cool. What an exciting experience it must have been.

Yes, hybridization is a real problem.

I am happy to hear that more P. canariensis habitat is to be found in Gran Canaria. This is also showed in an article, Phoenix canariensis in the wild [Principes 24(2), 1998)], where plenty of Phoenix habitat is seen on the Gran Canaria map. Still, compared to the past, natural stands of P. canariensis are very reduced in the wild. In Tenerife, where I visited, it seems that only two or three natural populations are found. A 16th century description (cited from the article) says about Tenerife: "the northern side of the island is completely covered by enchanting forests of palms [...]" - and also describes a situation from Gran Canaria: "[...] the whole island was a garden, all populated by palms, because we took away from a place they call Tamarasaite more than sixty thousand palm trees".

On the positive side, I think a growing biodiversity awareness is turning some things in the Canary Islands.

Here in this picture, P. canariensis is standing with its feet in the water, close to Asplenium ferns and willow trees (Salix canariensis) - not a typical dry, xeric setting.

post-9319-0-26711000-1396179697_thumb.jp

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Tobias Valentin

Trachycarpus (not sure about the species) Darjeeling, India

attachicon.giftrachy.jpg

Nice photo.

I guess the Trachycarpus stand is a cultivated one? - judging from the tended forest floor, and the flattened, smooth footpath (right corner).

My guess is T. fortunei ? It looks great.

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stevethegator

Trachycarpus (not sure about the species) Darjeeling, India

attachicon.giftrachy.jpg

Licuala bachmaensis: My Son, Vietnam

These palms are one of several Licualas used to make the ubiquitous 'non la' (conical hat)

attachicon.gifb.jpg

Thank you for sharing! I never knew licualas were used to make the 'non la'

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realarch

Beautiful photos everyone. Will & Steve, the photos in post #4 and # 10 are exceptional. That P. theophrastii pic is killer too.

Here are a few pics of Pritchardia martii in habitat on Oahu, Hawaii, leeward side taken on a PRA a few years back.

Sparse scattered populations, so no spectacular groves in this particular area. Beautiful none the less.

Tim

post-1300-0-70421600-1396209935_thumb.jp post-1300-0-15740400-1396209939_thumb.jp post-1300-0-40578300-1396209942_thumb.jp

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realarch

A couple more.

Tim

post-1300-0-05905900-1396210225_thumb.jp post-1300-0-16991600-1396210228_thumb.jp

post-1300-0-38434600-1396210231_thumb.jp post-1300-0-00259800-1396210235_thumb.jp

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gilles06

it will be a very log topic, won't be?

Very nice pritchardia...

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stevethegator

Nice pritchardias! I've never seen habitat pictures of them before

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stevethegator

it will be a very log topic, won't be?

Very nice pritchardia...

I hope so!

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Tobias Valentin

Mediterranean fan palm in the mountains of Tramuntana.

It's an article in english, with photos from habitats:

http://tobiasvalentin.dk/?page_id=425

To view it, please scroll down on the page.

Edited by Tobias Valentin

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Bennz

Rhopalostylis sapida, Waipatiki Beach NZ.

P1280745.jpg

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