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jdapalms

Dictyocaryum lamarckianum

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jdapalms

This is got to be one of the most beautiful palms in the world.

post-420-0-79049300-1395469110_thumb.jpg

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Tassie_Troy1971

I agree Jerry !

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Dr. George

Agreed - absolutely stunning palm! - gmp

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stevethegator

Where do they grow best in cultivation? I've heard they're an absolute no go in South Florida due to low altitude and too many extremes of temperature

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Jeff Searle

It just comes down to ........unreal. Unreal looking! Fake! Can't be! No way possible! Thanks Jerry.....

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Justin

Can't wait until mine are that big. They're growing quite well, maybe I should purchase a couple more!

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realarch

Beyond stunning Jerry, thanks for the photo. Mine are still babies, but already showing some great color.

Tim

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mike in kurtistown

Jerry,

As a friend, I hate to be negative, but other bluish or purplish areas (even the porch!) in the picture suggest some artificial color heightening. I have other pictures of the species taken myself or downloaded that show crownshafts that are sort of purplish like many Pinangas. Here are a couple of pics of one in a Hilo-area garden.

post-279-0-77659200-1395517081_thumb.jpg post-279-0-07688000-1395517084_thumb.jpg

I hope we're still friends!

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Dr. George

Dean's garden, 2009 (no photoshop or pic adjustments).

D. lamarckianum is an amazing palm. - gmp

post-3609-0-97464900-1395521891_thumb.jp

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mike in kurtistown

George,

I hope you are right, because I have five juveniles planted out. They are in full sun locations, but I have more juveniles in the shadehouse, and I am opening up more shaded areas for planting. I suppose it's also possible that there are varieties within the species that have different coloring, as with Euterpe precatoria, where Jeff Marcus sells a variety with a variegated crownshaft and varieties with orange crownshafts are reported.

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mike in kurtistown

I should add that, even without an electric blue crownshaft, this is one of the most striking large palms in the world. The shape of the crown is unique and quite pleasing. Everyone with enough space should try one.

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Dypsisdean

FYI - I have found that like many of the large Dypsis, the crownshaft color will vary a bit from frond to frond - with the most vivid color usually occuring immediately after an old sheath falls off. And yes Mike, there does appear to be some variability between individuals, unless the differences in the three I am growing are due to growing conditions.

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Cindy Adair

Simply stunning palm! My two are still tiny but as of last October were doing fine.

Thanks so much for the photos.

post-4111-0-75495400-1395614432_thumb.jp

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comic097

Dean's garden, 2009 (no photoshop or pic adjustments).

D. lamarckianum is an amazing palm. - gmp

attachicon.gif100_0472.JPG

I thought of growing natives when we first moved into our home, but when you see threads like this i'm glad I didn't, thanks so much for the pics

Paul :winkie:

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colin Peters

Thanks for posting Jerry. Wow stunning, can you imagine a forest of those.

aloha

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JakeK

If I had more time on my upcoming trip to Ecuador, I'd visit the Amazon side of the Andes where in some places they grow in abundance. I can't wait to get back to the ranch to see how much my seedlings have grown in probably the best climate for them outside their native range in 9 months.

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richnorm

No photoshop, they really can look like that.

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Mike Evans

Jerry, here is some pics I took 1 week earlier while staying at your spectacular garden. No photoshop here. When I saw this it was unbelievable! Your garden is world class. I still have not seen everything after 4 days. I will post more pics when I get my head screwed on straight.

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post-112-0-79433000-1395604754_thumb.jpg

post-112-0-24774800-1395604760_thumb.jpg

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NApalm

Whoa! These are nuts

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tikitiki

Another palm worth moving for.

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comic097

Well after many years drooling over these palms I have finally got one in my hands, thanks again Kennybenjamin :drool::drool::drool::drool:

post-7381-0-41679700-1396158915_thumb.jp

post-7381-0-64570900-1396158934_thumb.jp

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Cindy Adair

Congratulations! They are even distinctive and lovely when young!

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Kevin S

 Anyone have seedlings of these for sale on the big island ?

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richnorm
On 3/30/2014, 6:56:08, comic097 said:

Well after many years drooling over these palms I have finally got one in my hands, thanks again Kennybenjamin :drool::drool::drool::drool:

post-7381-0-41679700-1396158915_thumb.jp

post-7381-0-64570900-1396158934_thumb.jp

How are they doing in Brissie?

 

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Pedro 65
On Saturday, 22 March 2014 5:22:13, jdapalms said:

This is got to be one of the most beautiful palms in the world.

post-420-0-79049300-1395469110_thumb.jpg

Jerry, since your on PT right now I thought this was a good time to ask, I notice on yours the knockout colour isnt just on the new C/shaft its also on the old 1 and a tad of the petiole.

Out of the many I have grown from seed 1 has had  since a 1 leafer a red purple colour on quite a bit of it , I grew it up then planted in in a 12" tub with fast drainage and it now has 3 leaves and a good size spear.

I never plant this time of year ,but just had to put her inground in a Primo position, a few weeks ago, she's lookn good.

Sorry I cant add any pics yet till I get a new computer    but   do you remember if yours had great colour from the "start"

Look fwd to yr reply.

All best  Pete :)

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comic097

Such a sweet palm, hows yours going Dean 

post-7381-0-80661600-1432771370_thumb.jp

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Kevin S

 I wonder if anyone has any more recent photos on this palm ?

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Justin

Here's my lone remaining one.  Almost all of the ones in Leilani died from the SO2 during the eruption - this one survived I think because the Banyan Tree protected it.

DSC00040_1.JPG

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Kevin S
1 hour ago, Justin said:

Here's my lone remaining one.  Almost all of the ones in Leilani died from the SO2 during the eruption - this one survived I think because the Banyan Tree protected it.

DSC00040_1.JPG

 Sorry to hear you lost most of your palms. I have still not even acquired one for myself yet I know I’d be heartbreaking if I lost  even one of my palms.

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The Gerg

Here’s mine in Ventura, CA. Oh wait....dammit, this is just a purple king. The closest I can come (color wise) where I live. :huh:72A9B0B3-5245-4D1D-A1AA-53D7A32FA618.thumb.jpeg.9fc362574d6edc23eddc276ce13a3676.jpeg

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realarch

Ha Greg, you freaked me out....but just for a second!

My D. lamarckianum have started to grow a bit faster as of late including gaining some girth as well. I thinned out some of the canopy and that seemed to help, well at least that is my perception. I do have challenges with the fronds on a couple of them though. One emerged and grew so fast the petiole collapsed, but the palm powered on and the subsequent frond looks just fine. On another of the four in the garden, the new frond came out almost totally dried out, but again, the subsequent frond is looking healthy. We did have a long spell of damaging wind and that might have had something to do with it, but who knows. Anyway, I feel fortunate I can grow them at all considering my low elevation and fairly warm year around temps. Must be the constant Hilo rain. 

Here are a few photos. 

Tim 

P1070017.jpg

P1070018.jpg

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Kevin S

Tim  are any of the local growers offering this palm for sale ?

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realarch

Kevin, these particular palms seem to come and go, you'd have to check with local vendors. When they are available, you get them while you can.

Tim

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John hovancsek

These are so beautiful but so hard to find. It seems that I miss the opportunity every time

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