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Sandy Loam

Palms which survive a quick 18F blast

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Sandy Loam

Here is a list from the North Florida Palm Society (IPS affiliate) of cold-hardy palms suitable for the chilly far north of Florida:

http://palmsociety.blogspot.com/p/hardy-palm-list.html (3 pages)

QUESTION: Are there any palms missing from this list which would tolerate a quick overnight low of 18 degrees Fahrenheit, if followed by a sunny, warm 70 degrees five or six hours later? I'm talking about 18 degrees for perhaps 20 minutes -- not a sustained 18 degrees.

Why 18 degrees, you ask? 18 degrees is all I care about for long-term survivability. I ask for those of us who live in the cold strip from Charleston, SC to Jacksonville, FL and across the top, northern edge of the Gulf of Mexico (within an hour of the Gulf). The 18 degree extremity is sort of a threshold for those of us who live in that region ---- at least once every few years.

Thanks.

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Sandy Loam

Sorry, the link won't post on Palm Talk, even though it is to an IPS affiliate site. You'll have to google it under "North Florida Palm Society - Hardy Palm List".

Thanks in advance.

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Sutter Bob

Link is working for me.

I guess Jubaea might be touchy in humid areas.

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stevethegator

What about some Ravenas? I've seen box store rivularis "ignorantly" planted overwinter in high-teen lows, although in decent microclimates.

Aren't some of the more xeric Ravenas hardier than Rivularis?

Edited by stevethegator

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Sutter Bob

Although I don't have the benefit of multiple years of experience with xerophila (just a few winters), my early impression is that it is tougher than rivularis.

I have tried to grow quite a few rivularis over the years here.

They are plentiful and cheap in the big box stores. They tend to defoliate heavily with dips into the mid twenties, but the spears usually survive.

They slowly recover through the heat of summer with lots of water and fertilizer but spend many months with a beat up look.

That being said they make a great annual here due to their low cost and availability.

Xerophila so far seem to have tougher foliage, surviving dips into the mid twenties with much less damage.

They are slow growers, however, so if they ever sustain heavy damage it will be a long time recovering.

At least four of five xerophila made it through this winter with minimal defoliation and I expect steady growth over the next eight months (my smallest seedling (<1ft tall) did take a hit, but was uncovered. A larger uncovered specimen and three partially covered specimens all look pretty good to me.

Would love to hear from others in similar and colder climates.

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Alicehunter2000

It is my belief that some Bismarkia can survive a brief dip to those temps especially if kept dry. My larger Bizmarkia certainly saw temps in the low 20's for 12 hours or more and almost 30 hours total below freezing! Twice! this winter.............a little bit of brown tipping and 2-3 new spears shooting out as we dip back into the high 30's tonight. I will have several small Bismarkia that were subjected to either no protection or minimal protection throughout our winter........I think people will be surprised at the results.

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edbrown_III

I lost most of the S. glaucescens and S. flexuosa in 2001 I think it was a 25 or 26 F freeze that did them in --- the area that I got these from in Cerro Brasil had coconuts in the low lands and at a hotel in Cerro so they didnt' prove to be cold hardy unfortunately.

I had the green Bismarkia out in 2001 to now it has taken freezes down to 20F , never tested any lower as well as Cop. alba . I saw S. comosa at the top of Guimares Chapada very high Elevation about 20 miles from Cuiba (which has coconuts and some subtropical s ) Its one of those Syagrus that dont produce alot of seeds and has a short fruiting season so you just dont see it much --- very pretty and has leathery leaves sort of like a coconut or Jubeaopsis .

I dont want to dampen enthusiasm you can protect palms in marginal climates for long periods of time --- I am going on 20 years for D.. decaryi and Jubeopsis caffra ---- just plant them up against the house and drape with plastic be sure to place by window and drape the plastic or staple to house if you can and you get a nice little greenhouse that protects them. . I couldnt do this this year but put a Mr. Heater between the two and left it on over night -- I got down to 26-27 or so the very coldest night. One frond of the Jubeaopsis looks b urnt and the foliage of the Dypsis looks burnt but its 14 feet up in the air . I think the D. decaryi bud is okay though .

Best regards

Ed

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JLeVert

I would add Brahea moorei and Brahea decumbens. They have both done pretty well in Augusta, GA which is much colder than North Florida.

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