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PalmatierMeg

Plant Delights Feb. 2014 Newsletter notes Winter results for Coldhardy Palms

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Alicehunter2000

For those too scared to click on the link... :winkie:

Since we mentioned hardy palms earlier, our Trachycarpus fortunei (Windmill palms) looks fine, other than a few scorched older leaves. The Trachycarpus fortunei 'Wagnerianus' also look great. Surprisingly, our plant of Trachycarpus takil got some unexpected leaf scorch. Needle palm, Sabal minor, Sabal x brazoriensis, Sabal sp. 'Tamaulipas', Sabal minor var. louisiana, all look fine, although some of our less hardy forms of Sabal palmetto took a hit. Butia catarinensis looks quite dead, as does our Butia odorata. Surprisingly, one of our Butia eriospatha growing nearby shows minimal damage along with one specimen of Butia capitata. The real palm shocker was two Serenoa repens from Colleton County, SC showing little or no damage. We say, surprising, because we have never been able to over-winter a Serenoa repens.

The xButyagrus nabonnandii look pretty fried and the spears have started to pull. Spears are the undeveloped newer emerging leaves, which give us the first indication of cold damage on palms trees. Spear pull isn't always deadly, but it's certainly not a good sign. xJubautia splendens 'Dick Douglas', a hybrid of Butia x Jubaea looks better than the xButyagrus, but the spears have also pulled from several of these...most disappointing. Most of our Cycas looks okay, although all have lovely tan-brown foliage. After last frost we'll cut back the old fronds and they should promptly reflush with new leaves.

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