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palm tree man

The #1 Main Contender for Cold Tolerant Dypsis Champion of the World!

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palm tree man

Has anyone gotten a picture of the true dypsis heteromorpha? I sold twentynseedlings about ten years ago but with all the confusion I am not sure if they were true heteromorpha or not.

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palm tree man

How hardy is Dypsis Carlsmithii? Is it as hardy as Prestoniana? It seems to be shrouded in mystery to some extent. Has it ever been identified in the wild?

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LJG

No, it is more cold tender plus it is a rain forest palm. So yes it has been found in the wild.

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palm tree man

Great question, so how hardy is it really? 30 degrees to me not really hardy at all. There are many tropical plants that can handle a "freeze" but what dypsis can? Oh and survive for the next season aside from decipiens?

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Sutter Bob

I haven't had any luck with small leptocheilos on two occasions. Have not tried decaryi here yet. I need to give it a try.

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palm tree man

Let me know how it does brother and how all your palms do as well.

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Palmdude

DDxPembana or Cabadae would be cool, both fairly hardy and maybe you could get a faster cold hardy clumper that could re grow from the roots

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palm tree man

I like the way you think man! I second that thought! A Dypsis Decipiens that could regrow from its own roots should a short ice age happen would be something that was truly heavenly!

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Phoenikakias

I like the way you think man! I second that thought! A Dypsis Decipiens that could regrow from its own roots should a short ice age happen would be something that was truly heavenly!

I second to that too! It has also occured to me with Chamaedorea costaricana. It had been leveled to the groung by the 2004 cold blast, but root system remained intact and this year is flowering ...

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palm tree man

That is really the beauty of a clumping palm, you get a "do over" during severe or unusual weather. I read something interesting on GOTE. Some have had more success with Dypsis Carlsmithii and less success with Dypsis Saintelucei this really surprised me. In the forum thread it even said that A. Cunninghamia were severly damaged and Carlsmithii was not. I didn't think it was that hardy. Any thoughts guys?

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Palmdude

Decipiens X Pembana or Cabadae would be cool.... Maybe

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palm tree man

That would be pretty cool both are beautiful palms and would make a pretty impressive clump of trunks! There are many theories out now among hortoculturists and growers that there could be a high percentage of seed in cultivation right now that is already of hybrid origin. Much like the many Phoenix of mixed parentage that are showing up everywhere.

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

I'm just gonna bump this old thread instead of making a new one. Anyone want to give there experiences with this awesome genus. Would love to get a consensus top 5 

T J 

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Xerarch

Unfortunately the hardiness of D decipiens is a moot point here since it seems it doesn't like the incessant heat and humidity for most of the year.  I've followed the trials in comparable places like central Florida and whatever is about the climate, they just don't seem to like it.  I would love to find a good Dypsis that can handle infrequent dips to the mid 20's but also tolerate the conditions for the rest of the year.

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
12 hours ago, Xerarch said:

I would love to find a good Dypsis that can handle infrequent dips to the mid 20's but also tolerate the conditions for the rest of the year.

I think for the simple fact that since I can't grow dypsis outside of a pot it makes me absolutely jealous of those who can grow them.  Amazing genus and almost makes me want to move just to grow them =/ 

On a side note does anyone have any decipiens hybrids growing outside of Cali or S.Florida ? How about Triangle x Teddies seems like they could be more cold hardy. 

T J 

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