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palm tree man

The #1 Main Contender for Cold Tolerant Dypsis Champion of the World!

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palm tree man

I know among the Dypsis that we are currently growing in cultivation that Dypsis Decipiens is the cold hardy champion, but who is second in line? Is it Ambositrae from the same habitat? Or would you place a clumper in the runnings such as Onilahensis or Baronii? What about Dypsis Saintelucei; I have heard some really great things about it as well. What say you ladies and gentlemen? I am sure there are many more that can be added to this very meager list.

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stevethegator

How about decaryi? I've seen those in parts of North Florida

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palm tree man

That is a good start, I have seen many people grow them with some winter protection at time and they are widely used for landscape purposes. They were selling them at HD in Port Orange Florida; so someone must believe they will make it at least for a period of time anyway.

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DALION

Dypsis lutescens has seen several below freezing days and counting days of frost at my mom's house. So I have to say they are very cold hardy.

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DALION

That is a good start, I have seen many people grow them with some winter protection at time and they are widely used for landscape purposes. They were selling them at HD in Port Orange Florida; so someone must believe they will make it at least for a period of time anyway.

HD doesn't care if they survive. It's a numbers game for them and the suppliers are the ones that pay if they die.

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palm tree man

A friend of mine that owns a nursery told me he won't deal with them for that same reason. It is a common palm but it has been known to come back from its roots if burnt very badly, so I would have to agree that it should receive some recognition.

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Brahea Axel

The entire decipiens complex is probably hardy, that one includes decipiens, betafaka #1, blue decipiens, and ambositrae. Most are 9b (hardy to 25F).

The baronii/onilahensis complex is not hardy at all, just very cool tolerant, these are 10a plants (hardy to 28F).

The robusta/prestoniana complex is pretty decent when it comes to hardiness, but still 10a plants.

(Note: I rate hardiness according to where the palm grows bullet proof, not where it can eek out an existence with damage and occasional death. For example if the palm damages and/or dies 28F, then I rate it 10a.)

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palm tree man

If you want to know about Dypsis our friends in California know as much as anyone in the world. Thanks Axel, how large do ambositrae get. The real ambositrae; the original seed that I received was what was called the "fake ambositrae" the real name for that palm escapes me know. Anyway, I have a five gallon that I have been growing out, but have always been afraid to plant it out. You made a very good point about how you rate hardiness; this gives a good picture of what the palm an take and always look healthy. Many gardeners do not like burnt palms or plants for that matter. It doesn't bother me really, just gives me new thatching for the Tiki Hut, but it is important to know for a much easier and pleasant gardening experience. Thanks buddy, hope your weekend has been a great one.

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palm tree man

I seem to remember a thread on the different forms of Decipiens that I read before I officially joined PalmTalk. You were involved in that thread weren't you? What is the difference between the different forms of Decipiens? I have a what will be a fifteen gallon that has exhibited the emerging red leaf. I have always called it the "Super Red" because that is the name given when I bought it. Which form is the "Super Red"?

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Sutter Bob

I'm very optimistic that betafaka is going to be just a little less cold tolerant than decipiens. Time will tell. Two seedlings doing well here.

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Brahea Axel

I'm very optimistic that betafaka is going to be just a little less cold tolerant than decipiens. Time will tell. Two seedlings doing well here.

You inspired me to pick up another one, this time from JD Andersen, it looks a bit different from the one I already have, much darker green. I am crossing my fingers I've got the same one you have now. We should exchange photos on those.

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Xhoniwaters1

From what I understand prestoniana is a solid 26-25F. Add to the list Dypsis heteromorpha...that one should be worth mentioning as well

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Sutter Bob

I'm very optimistic that betafaka is going to be just a little less cold tolerant than decipiens. Time will tell. Two seedlings doing well here.

You inspired me to pick up another one, this time from JD Andersen, it looks a bit different from the one I already have, much darker green. I am crossing my fingers I've got the same one you have now. We should exchange photos on those.

I bought my first one from Dan Andersen, just got through third winter.

post-3415-0-01777700-1393208372_thumb.jp

Second one from George Sparkman, through second winter.

post-3415-0-19686700-1393208411_thumb.jp

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Brahea Axel

I'm very optimistic that betafaka is going to be just a little less cold tolerant than decipiens. Time will tell. Two seedlings doing well here.

You inspired me to pick up another one, this time from JD Andersen, it looks a bit different from the one I already have, much darker green. I am crossing my fingers I've got the same one you have now. We should exchange photos on those.

I bought my first one from Dan Andersen, just got through third winter.

20140223_085257_resized.jpg

Second one from George Sparkman, through second winter.

Your second one looks a lot like decipiens. Today I checked in on the one I got from Joe that I thought would not make it. To my surprise it's pushing a healthy new bright red spear.

I got one from JD Andersen and it looks a bit different.

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Sutter Bob

These two are slightly different from each other and both a bit different from the decipiens I've got here.

The first one has very red emergent growth.

The second one is already growing again.

Whatever they are I'm happy to have em.

Here's my largest decipiens, also from George Sparkman.

It's also growing again with a dark red spear.

post-3415-0-48899100-1393211547_thumb.jp

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palm tree man

Beautiful palm, is he willing to mail order? I know Mr. Anderson will or has to me in the past. I really would like to get one. Thank you for the post!

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PalmatierMeg

Decipiens can't make it through my hot, humid summers. Decaryi is good to about 25F so bullet proof. If you get a decaryi be sure to mound plant it. Stem is prone to rot at the base if it sits in water.

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Darold Petty

re post # 8, 'fake ambositrae' (first introduction as ambo) is now D. plumosa. :)

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Brahea Axel

If you want to know about Dypsis our friends in California know as much as anyone in the world. Thanks Axel, how large do ambositrae get. The real ambositrae; the original seed that I received was what was called the "fake ambositrae" the real name for that palm escapes me know. Anyway, I have a five gallon that I have been growing out, but have always been afraid to plant it out. You made a very good point about how you rate hardiness; this gives a good picture of what the palm an take and always look healthy. Many gardeners do not like burnt palms or plants for that matter. It doesn't bother me really, just gives me new thatching for the Tiki Hut, but it is important to know for a much easier and pleasant gardening experience. Thanks buddy, hope your weekend has been a great one.

re post # 8, 'fake ambositrae' (first introduction as ambo) is now D. plumosa. :)

Yeah. Darold is right, and in fact, there's little resemblance between ambositrae and plumosa, and their cultural requirements are different. Plumosa has more frost tender foliage, a higher kill temperature and is less "chill-wet" tolerant than ambositrae, by a long shot.

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palm tree man

I agree. I had the fake that I grew from seed on an auction site; they didn't seem even close to the ambositrae in hardiness and nothing like it in looks. Nice dypsis but "there is nothing like the real thing."

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Sandy Loam

So, is there consensus on what is the second most cold-hardy Dypsis after Dypsis Decipiens? I don't think I saw a clear answer above. I only saw speculation about maybe dypsis betafaka #1, maybe dypsis heteromorpha, and so on.

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palm tree man

Not yet, when I contacted a well known seed broker that I know he said he would recommend ambrositrae. I am going to put mine in the ground and see; I have 100 seeds in a community pot so hopefully if it does well I will have a few more in the ground in a few years. I am interested in heteromorpha because of its environment and its location it just seems like a logical choice as well. Axel has really got me on the hunt for a betafaka also. Idk, what do you think?

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Sandy Loam

Another question still lingers if anyone can answer it:

Is there a single Dypsis (apart from Dypsis Decipiens) that can survive 18 degrees Fahrenheit -- even a very quick 18 degrees lasting minutes and surrounded by 70 degrees within a few hours. If the answer is "no", please just post a quick "no".

Many thanks.

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stevethegator

I never say never!

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palm tree man

As of right now not to my knowledge but I have got several new ones to try. I still think that if you don't have to have a huge dypsis a clumper that can regrown from its roots given the worst case scenario might be the key. Right now I am looking into a few different clumping species as well. I agree with Steve. We need to just keep looking and trying.

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Darold Petty

I can't speak to frost hardiness, but D. heteromorpha requires a lot of warmth and sunshine to grow and advance. It's a non-starter here in my heat-starved, foggy microclimate.

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richnorm

I don't think the real heteromorpha is in cultivation. And what the heck is betefaka anyway?! Just a form of decipiens imo. What passes as ambo these days (itself possibly an imposter!) is not really a great deal tougher than a bunch of other dypsis. DD stands alone with those tough leaflets and highland distribution. Real heteromorpha would possibly be a contender if ever we get verified seed and there are others like pumila, ankaizinensis etc which haven't made it into cultivation yet.

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Alicehunter2000

Don't Dypsis freely hybridize? Why hasn't someone taken a clumped that regrow from roots and mixed it with decipiens? Or taken a tough ol' triangle and mix it with an even tougher DD? For that matter take the fastest growing Dypsis and mix that with DD?

Butia's are the coldest hardy pinate palm ...... DD'S are the coldest hardy crownshafted palm......just sayin'.

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palm tree man

I have wondered the exact same thing for a long time buddy. Dypsis decipiens is such an amazing palm; I have wondered since there are many seeding now. Why none of been hybridized. The only reason I can think of is preservation of purity of the species. DD are worth a great deal just like they are without having to go to the trouble of hybridization. The fact that seed cannot be obtained from Madagascar might also keep growers from cross pollinating with another dypsis. I agree totally though.

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Sutter Bob

I have also wondered about a baronii x decipiens cross. It'll be a long time before I get a chance to try one here.

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palm tree man

If you ever do man, messge me. I would love to buy seed from you!

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Alicehunter2000

Wouldn't you want to use the DD as the mother plant....in Butia's it seems the hardiness comes from the mothers side. Don't know if it holds true for other species.

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palm tree man

I think I probably would because I myself would want more DD traits. It is really an amazingly beautiful palm but I would want more speed of growth. I don't think that I could improve much on its appearance. It is all up to personal taste though and some might like a more trunks or different leaves, etc. :)

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Sutter Bob

I always get that backwards.

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LJG

Don't Dypsis freely hybridize? Why hasn't someone taken a clumped that regrow from roots and mixed it with decipiens? Or taken a tough ol' triangle and mix it with an even tougher DD? For that matter take the fastest growing Dypsis and mix that with DD?

Butia's are the coldest hardy pinate palm ...... DD'S are the coldest hardy crownshafted palm......just sayin'.

David, I think one reason is there simply are not many flowering DD in cultivation. Even if there were it is not easy making hybrids with Dypsis. It takes some work. And then throw in slow growth, and people that would do it for monetary reasons would have to sit on them too long for a good ROI. If this were to be done you need guys like JD at sea breeze palms that makes a few bucks for his efforts and sells them small. I know cool hybrids are being done here in SoCal when various Dypsis flower. Right now I have Onily x Prestoniana germinating in my GH. Should be interesting. But slow :)

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palm tree man

Do you think that it will form a single trunk or clump? I agree when hybridizing with slow growing species it is more for the love of the game then love of the coin.

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Alicehunter2000

Understandable...now since I don't know much about Dypsis, what might be some of the best crosses with DD. Cold hardiness, fastest growth and coolest looking? I imagine crossing with a triangle (one of the few species I'm familiar with) would be both cold hardy and cool looking....but not very fast.

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palm tree man

I have limited greenhouse experience with them aside from Dypsis Decipiens. What is the fastest growing semi hardy dypsis?

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LJG

Understandable...now since I don't know much about Dypsis, what might be some of the best crosses with DD. Cold hardiness, fastest growth and coolest looking? I imagine crossing with a triangle (one of the few species I'm familiar with) would be both cold hardy and cool looking....but not very fast.

For people wanting more of a cold tolerant plant I would think a Decaryii would be good to cross with. Leptocheilos would be cool too :).

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palm tree man

Now Leptocheilos would be cool that would be a real winner!

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