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Tyrone

Clay soils- How do these palms go in it.

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Tyrone

I've moved down to my new property in Albany on the south coast, and my soil is basically 1/3 clay and 2/3 peat and organic matter. Having come from Perth with nothing but water repellant sand this is a totally new experience for me. The ground holds a lot of moisture and the lawns here don't even need irrigating in summer to remain green!!!

How will Beccariophoenix no windows (madagascariensis) go, and alfredii. Also will Parajubaea's handle this sort of soil?

Basically if I water once a week the ground stays moist.

I'm thinking any Archontophoenix and Ravenea rivularis will be in heaven.

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NApalm

Congrats Tyronne. Dont know about the others, but archos love the clay. No dramas there

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Hammer

I have clay at my place. My alfies seem to love it. My 'no windows' is still in a pot so I can't comment on that one. But I suspect it will be ok too.

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Tyrone

Thanks guys. First time back on Palmtalk since the move and I need to change my signature I think. (Waiting on ADSL at my house so using the work computer. )

It's so much cooler down here. It doesn't feel like summer at all. :(

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_Keith

With that high peat content, the thing to watch might not be the clay so much as the ph.

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Tyrone

pH is 6-6.5. Should be OK me thinks. :D

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_Keith

pH is 6-6.5. Should be OK me thinks. :D

That is a great ph. With that much peat, I would have thought it to be much lower.

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Sutter Bob

B. alfredii, while not an easy grow here, so far seems to do ok in heavy soil as long as it's sheltered from frost.

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richnorm

Clay is your friend! Parajubaeas love it. Haven't grown enough Beccariophoenix but certainly no signs of problems yet. Sometimes palms (eg queens, caryotas) will push up out of heavy clay and become wobbly. This is rectified by banking -up some soil around the base. My lawns are always green too and never get watered.

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Tyrone

B. alfredii, while not an easy grow here, so far seems to do ok in heavy soil as long as it's sheltered from frost.

That's awesome then. Frost in the area I'm in is an extremely rare occurrence and I have 3 dams/lakes in the middle of the property so the water should keep things a few degrees warmer on the coolest nights.

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Tyrone

Clay is your friend! Parajubaeas love it. Haven't grown enough Beccariophoenix but certainly no signs of problems yet. Sometimes palms (eg queens, caryotas) will push up out of heavy clay and become wobbly. This is rectified by banking -up some soil around the base. My lawns are always green too and never get watered.

Great. In goes my two Parajubaeas after work then. :yay:

I planted my two big Caryota gigas on the island on the weekend in what was almost pure peat, as well as a Pritchardia lowreyana.

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Phoenikakias

Tyrone, you think Pritchardia as a whole genus grows well in a peaty soil? Or is the loweryana only that has this particular preference? Mine (among them also loweryana) grow well in clay soil, how is that compatible with peat, or soil structure is generally indifferent to the genus?

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Tyrone

Tyrone, you think Pritchardia as a whole genus grows well in a peaty soil? Or is the loweryana only that has this particular preference? Mine (among them also loweryana) grow well in clay soil, how is that compatible with peat, or soil structure is generally indifferent to the genus?

I don't know. I've only grown things in sand. Glad your Pritchardias grow well in clay. I have some hillebrandiis here that will do well then.

Some areas are only peat. Sometimes you're pulling out of the ground stuff that looks like coconut coir. Other areas have more clay.

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Peter G

When are we going to see pictures of your new gardens?

I have a couple of recently germinated Orianopsis for you to plant down there!

Any rabbits or kangaroos eating your plants?

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DoomsDave

Tyrone:

Good move, mate!

Clay soil is about the best you can have, if it's well amended.

As you note, it holds water very well.

To answer your question from my own experience: Archies are in hawg heaven, B. no-window and alfredii both do well, along with the parajubes.

You might have to watch tillering Dypsis like decipiens, and plant them on the high side.

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DoomsDave

Here's a picture of some of my Archies in Hawg Heaven, with Pritchardtia in the background (and flaming Liquidambars in the far background).

056.JPG?format=750w

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DoomsDave

Here's another plant that seems to like the clay . . .

006%20(2).JPG?format=750w

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Tyrone

Looks great Dave. Glad the Chambeyronias do well too as that is what I want to plant a few of. Your garden looks fantastic.

Peter, when I get the internet running at home I'll post some pics.

Thanks for the Oraniopsis too. I love them. The cooler weather has had a good effect on the NC and cooler loving palms too. Many days are cloudy with high humidity. Nights are in the mid to high teens and the days are around 20-24C with high humidity. There is not much difference in temp between day and night, only a few degrees. Every week something falls from the sky. We had a thunderstorm move through last week and drop about 8mm in a few minutes. We drove home last night with some light drizzle.

No rabbits or kangaroos there either. Just ducks, cormorants, ibis and black cockatoos and a family of blue wrens.

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DoomsDave

I also have Oraniopsis in my place, slow as a constipated Congress, but looking good.

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Tyrone

I have one surviving Oraniopsis I brought down with me that I brought in as a one leafer years ago. They would do OK through winter but stall and rot in summer, even though I kept them in dense shade and never let them dry out or get the dry easterlies on them. They performed like Ceroxylons for me, a no go really. I suppose they hated the 30C at midnight nights we get through summer at times in Perth.

My one little one has only been down 3 weeks in a moist shade house and is opening a new healthy looking leaf which hopefully will not turn brown at the tips. It's much much happier now. :) .

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Phoenikakias

Here's another plant that seems to like the clay . . .

006%20(2).JPG?format=750w

David, another pic of your Chamby in broad daylight would be clarifying :winkie:

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