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jfrye01@live.com

Beccariophoenix madagascariensis/alfredii

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jfrye01@live.com

I've been doing some research on these palms, and have found they may be a nice substitute for a coco in my 6B/7A yard...anyone grown one of these?? Based on your experience, which is better? Or would the Parajubea torallyi be a better bet? Thanks!

Edited by jfrye01@live.com

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Zeeth

I would wait until you got some good experience with protecting Trachycarpus and Butia in your climate before trying 9b palms. If I were you, I would get a Howea forsteriana and Lytocaryum weddellianum to grow indoors if you want something more tropical looking until then.

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jfrye01@live.com

Lol good point...I think maybe I'm going a little overboard...haha

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Brad Mondel

I haven't even tried that one, been growing palms since I was a kid too. Lol

As far as cocos go, I've killed two because they rot in the winter, inside. They need almost greenhouse experiences to survive IMO.

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jfrye01@live.com

The beccariophoenix are supposed to be 25 degrees hardier than a regular coco, but who knows if they really are...one would think that there would be more of them on the east and gulf coasts, but I honestly don't think I've ever seen one...

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Flow

Beccariophoenix are still pretty new in cultivation. B.alfredii has only been described in 2007 or so. They are much hardier than coconut but then again many palms are. Parajubaea will take -3/4C without damage but they resent prolonged cold periods. Also, they get tall pretty quickly. Don't know about Beccariophoenix. There is at least one Parajubaea tvt in Brissago (southern Switzerland). Not a chance north of the alps though.

Edited by Flow

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Hammer

I haven't even tried that one, been growing palms since I was a kid too. Lol

As far as cocos go, I've killed two because they rot in the winter, inside. They need almost greenhouse experiences to survive IMO.

The trick is to pot the cocos in nearly pure sand and cut way back on the water. That will make a huge difference in survivability through winter.

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Hammer

The beccariophoenix are supposed to be 25 degrees hardier than a regular coco, but who knows if they really are...one would think that there would be more of them on the east and gulf coasts, but I honestly don't think I've ever seen one...

If I were you I would grow B. madagascariensis (no windows). Super coconutty, cold tolerant (still needs protection in your zone), and a slow grower. The slow growth will be a major plus for you, meaning it will take much longer to out grow your winter shelter.

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jfrye01@live.com

Haha...sorry if this is a silly question, but what does "no windows" mean? :P

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Zeeth

The beccariophoenix are supposed to be 25 degrees hardier than a regular coco, but who knows if they really are...one would think that there would be more of them on the east and gulf coasts, but I honestly don't think I've ever seen one...

No way it's that hardy. It's hardy to 25 degrees (without frost), which is hardier than a coconut. Coconuts get damage here below about 30 (without frost), but if the cold is prolonged they suffer badly, and frost damages both palms way more than ultimate low temps. I would put Beccariophoenix at about 5 degrees hardier to ultimate low temps, but much more tolerant of prolonged cold temps.

The no windows version confused me too when I first heard it. Check out this thread for more info

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/29904-beccariophoenix-breakdown/

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Brahea Axel

There is no way that ANY of the beccariophoenix are readily growable even with protection in 8b and below. The cold soil will kill them, not to mention the duration of cold and lack of light in a Winter protection structure. Even parajubaea can't be done readily, and they're considerably hardier. Both of these genera would require considerable power and physical structure to heat soil and air and light properly in Winter. They're not impossible but they really would take a lot of resources.

Butia, sabal and trachys are difficult enough, they'll keep you very busy. Look up jubaea, that's a slow palm with some hardiness you could keep going for a while with a protection structure. But it will eventually get too big to protect.

Kentia are fantastic indoor coconutty palms, get one of those to grow inside.

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jfrye01@live.com

Thanks for the link! That helps explain it...in the outside chance that I do, indeed, want to try a Parajubea cocoides also, how do they handle summer temps? My summer temps range from the mid 80s to high 90s...

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jfrye01@live.com

I swear I'm not crazy...well, no more crazy than the rest of us;)

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stevethegator

Thanks for the link! That helps explain it...in the outside chance that I do, indeed, want to try a Parajubea cocoides also, how do they handle summer temps? My summer temps range from the mid 80s to high 90s...

They don't. Lol

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Alberto

If you really want a Parajubaea, P.sunhka is hardier than P.cocoides.!

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Hammer

Bro you need to move to FL, Cali or HI fast.

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jfrye01@live.com

Haha you're telling me!! I'm a commercial pilot in training, and they can live anywhere, so hopefully in a few years, I'll be able to live in Key West or something;)

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jfrye01@live.com

Haha you're telling me!! I'm a commercial pilot in training, and they can live anywhere, so hopefully in a few years, I'll be able to live in Key West or something;)

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Tropicdoc

Beccariophoenix have huge root systems and grow poorly in pots.

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