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palm tree man

Steve that is a very solid point man. Sabal Palmetto is a deep, deep subject, so why don't we turn our attention toward Sabal Brazoria. Which is a cool palm.

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palm tree man

Brazoria is a hybrid but here is the catch it is a very old natural hybrid. It has been estimated that it was hybridized before any settlers ever reached that part of Texas; possibly even 1,000 years ago. The population there is also self sustaining and they cross pollinate with each other and produce seedlings true to form. It was thought to be a population that got isolated from other populations because of environmental changes.

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palm tree man

Originally it was believed to be a hybrid of Sabal Mexicana and Minor, but do to genetic research it has been proven to exhibit much more in common with palmetto and then secondly with sabal minor. Amazing really.

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Brad Mondel

Here's an update of the alleged riverside. It looks like it suffers from some cold damage here in zone 8b. Notice the leaflets are not bifurcate. I'm still not certain if this is riverside, it resembles birmingham a lot and It's a very slow grower putting on 1-3 leaves per year. 

image.jpeg

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RJ
On 12/23/2015, 2:32:40, Brad Mondel said:

Here's an update of the alleged riverside. It looks like it suffers from some cold damage here in zone 8b. Notice the leaflets are not bifurcate. I'm still not certain if this is riverside, it resembles birmingham a lot and It's a very slow grower putting on 1-3 leaves per year. 

image.jpeg

Do three years later did you come to any conclusion? Is the S. Riverside?

 

 

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Brad Mondel

Not sure. I haven't been over to my Grandma's in a few years. That's where it's planted.

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