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Brahea Axel

why do people hate palm trees?

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Brahea Axel
Silas_Sancona

Axel,

A theory about palm-hatred: limited or no exposure to "Palms outside the box"...and a lack to introduce such options by the average joe nurseries.. Many frustrating conversations trying to bring such material into the nurseries I worked at back there.

Tropicals, in general?: same lack of knowledge... and the "it will not survive belief" most people have, at least from my experiences with the general public.

Id also throw Desert stuff into that personal opinion as well.. Most people id consult with had the same basic assumption.. that Desert/Arid-type plants = cactus.. Funny how getting out and actually seeing what grows in such places reveals incredible diversity in what options are actually out there. Personally, some of the landscapes I saw throughout Phoenix were much nicer and attention drawing than the cookie cutter expanses of lawns and box store plants we see way too often.

A sad reality id come across sometimes were people who did not know the meaning of Deciduous. Isn't that something one learns by 4th grade?? Anyhow,

-Nathan-

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Phoenikakias

I have case studied this phenomen quite well and I have discovered multiple causes. Palms do not produce in our latitudes anything with economical interest (fruits, oil). Palms do not produce big colorful flowers. Palms do not create deep shade. Many of us (if not all) try also more marginal spss which do not have a very decorative effect (if not at all). Palms need more care in summer, when people want to go on vacation and of course they are more or less cold sensitive. Many palms have spiny leaves and their fronds are not suitable for composting, so a dicard of pruned leaves is a problem itself. Now if you add recent problems with pests in Europe (rpw and paysandisia), meaning dead, ugly plants (whose removal is also troublesome- have you ever tried to cut down a freshly dead CIDP?) or constant spraying, which neighbouts have to endure, all becomes explicable.

Edited by Phoenikakias
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Cindy Adair

I don't share the anti-palm sentiments but enjoyed reading the articles nevertheless. The Chilean palm video from Kew is worth seeing too.

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sgvcns

I disagree that topicals have fallen out of favour in the landscape world.

They are hard to grow in marginal climates as roses are problematical here.

Tropicals are quite popular in Brisbane but people sell plants imported from the tropical north that are destined to fail.

This can be palms/heliconias/gingers etc. Lipstick palms are not a plant for the garden in Brisbane but are sold to the unsuspecting at plant shows here. They will not survive unless grown in controlled conditions.

As the knowledge of what is possible increases then these should be grown but the $ seems to dictates quick profits.

No wonder the average punter here can get disheartened.

I would imagine it would be even more critical in your climate.

If you grow tropicals out of the tropics then you should expect failures but the box store customer or those mislead on success rates will not go back for more failure.

Plants need to be sold with a realistic assessment/advice of success .

Most gardeners don't want to have to bring plants in or construct shelters.

I still persist with some palms but I don't expect long term success.

There is a difference between we palm/tropicals nuts and the average gardener

Steve

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Phoenikakias

I disagree that topicals have fallen out of favour in the landscape world.

They are hard to grow in marginal climates as roses are problematical here.

Tropicals are quite popular in Brisbane but people sell plants imported from the tropical north that are destined to fail.

This can be palms/heliconias/gingers etc. Lipstick palms are not a plant for the garden in Brisbane but are sold to the unsuspecting at plant shows here. They will not survive unless grown in controlled conditions.

As the knowledge of what is possible increases then these should be grown but the $ seems to dictates quick profits.

No wonder the average punter here can get disheartened.

I would imagine it would be even more critical in your climate.

If you grow tropicals out of the tropics then you should expect failures but the box store customer or those mislead on success rates will not go back for more failure.

Plants need to be sold with a realistic assessment/advice of success .

Most gardeners don't want to have to bring plants in or construct shelters.

I still persist with some palms but I don't expect long term success.

There is a difference between we palm/tropicals nuts and the average gardener

Steve

Yeah, I can not but underline the last sentence.

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KennyRE317

To most they cant differentiate between palms and all they know are the ones from the big box stores. Before joining palmtalk I thought the same way and was just going to plant archontophoenix species everywhere

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Tropicgardener

It is interesting and sometimes disheartening to hear comments of palm haters.........Queensland is an interesting case. Much of the Southern coast of Queensland shares a similar climate to Southern Florida but you don't see as much palm flora grown. In Miami you see Coconut Palms absolutely everywhere, in Brisbane (where they can grow to perfection) you really have to look around to find any.

Part of the Queensland problem has been poor selection by wholesalers........Queen Palms were one mistake and everyone in Queensland hates Queen Palms and effectively they are treated as a weed. Wholesalers these days tend to only grow palms that are easily propagated and quick growing so that a rapid turnover can be made. As a result choice of palms in many nurseries is limited to common species such as Golden Canes, Foxtails, Alexandra and Rhapis etc. with the occasional Solitaire or Macarthur making an appearance.

The general public only know a few species of palms and most nurseries wouldn't know one palm from the next. I used to enjoy showing differing palm alternatives when I showed people around my own garden for example advising them to use Macarthurs instead of Golden Canes. Many of the good old retail nurseries and have been replace by hardware nurseries!! quite often their staff are poorly trained and unable to offer sound advise on tropical plants.

Then you have the Native Nazi's...........as far as they are concerned any plant that is not native is a weed and any palm even though it is native is still a weed !!!!....... These sort of people have done a huge amount of damage to the reputation of palms and other tropical plants.

Another problem for Queensland is that our garden media is generally based in Southern Australia and adopt a 'one size fits all' approach to gardening in Australia and just simply ignore or refuse to recognize warmer climate zones. As a result of this you get misinformed gardeners attempting to replicate southern or European style gardens with appalling results.

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radicalis

Yikes. The dispatch from Dallas is so snooty it's gross. But also, it's just dumb. Hopefully folks in DFW will get that someone who conflates oxygen and CO2, misuses the word 'deciduous', and thinks that fire ants are native to Texas (wtf?) is not the best source for landscaping advice.

The Miami article and associated comments were pretty hilarious, though.

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grant b.

could this have to do with water and fertilizer demands? the costs associated with maintenance of non-self-cleaning palms? disease susceptibility? variety availability?

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Silas_Sancona

A good point made by Tropicgardener, echoed here in the states: most people are most familiar with gardening magazines whose emphasis are on plants for cooler climates. While the occasional article or two concerning tropical plants might surface, good luck finding anything related to newer palms to try, or extensive articles dealing with hardier exotic plant options.

While great ideas in places like the Midwest, most of the garden designs/ plants featured one might see in some of these magazines are tough to duplicate in places like California, or here in Florida.

-Nathan-



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NApalm

It is interesting and sometimes disheartening to hear comments of palm haters.........Queensland is an interesting case. Much of the Southern coast of Queensland shares a similar climate to Southern Florida but you don't see as much palm flora grown. In Miami you see Coconut Palms absolutely everywhere, in Brisbane (where they can grow to perfection) you really have to look around to find any.

Part of the Queensland problem has been poor selection by wholesalers........Queen Palms were one mistake and everyone in Queensland hates Queen Palms and effectively they are treated as a weed. Wholesalers these days tend to only grow palms that are easily propagated and quick growing so that a rapid turnover can be made. As a result choice of palms in many nurseries is limited to common species such as Golden Canes, Foxtails, Alexandra and Rhapis etc. with the occasional Solitaire or Macarthur making an appearance.

The general public only know a few species of palms and most nurseries wouldn't know one palm from the next. I used to enjoy showing differing palm alternatives when I showed people around my own garden for example advising them to use Macarthurs instead of Golden Canes. Many of the good old retail nurseries and have been replace by hardware nurseries!! quite often their staff are poorly trained and unable to offer sound advise on tropical plants.

Then you have the Native Nazi's...........as far as they are concerned any plant that is not native is a weed and any palm even though it is native is still a weed !!!!....... These sort of people have done a huge amount of damage to the reputation of palms and other tropical plants.

Another problem for Queensland is that our garden media is generally based in Southern Australia and adopt a 'one size fits all' approach to gardening in Australia and just simply ignore or refuse to recognize warmer climate zones. As a result of this you get misinformed gardeners attempting to replicate southern or European style gardens with appalling results.

You said it. Especially the part about southern media. Really gets my goat

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DoomsDave

The person from Miami was a hoot.

"Pillaring odes to uselessness"?

"Phallic obelisks of ugly"?? :floor: :floor: :floor: :floor: :floor: :floor:

I'll save that as a great example of prose defeating the message by its over-done-ness.

I guess he won't be coming to the next palm society meeting. :winkie:

(On the other hand, given the notes at the bottom of his blog, he could be a crazed convert some day.)

I guess there's a bit of hope for Ms. Allison in Dallas . . . maybe show her some of the gardens of our local members that rival what you see out here.

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DoomsDave

Well, Chucky D wasn't right about everything. :winkie:

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PANGEA EXPRESS

Well, in this drought I'm sure any plant requiring excessive water is going to get a bad rep.

The hatred of palms is most likely based on the lack of knowledge people have about them. Most people would be suppressed to know there are more than 10 species of palms let alone thousands. And that this diversity allows for an abundance of forms and uses in the landscape.

I can understand the hatred. I personally have a great distaste for most deciduous plants.

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WestCoastGal

Wow Axel those were some over the top hateful articles you found. Makes you wonder if those writers can hate palms like this what else they hate with such intensity. They might think that palms are ugly but a reading of their words shows another kind of ugliness. I did have to laugh at some of the descriptions made. Also enjoyed reading some of the comments as well. Like the person who pointed out that those shaggy palms along a wilderness trail were homes for animals that fed on rats and bugs keeping those populations in check...so they didn't overrun commercial and residential areas.

I also have to think that most palms are pretty low maintenance which makes them attractive to many. Today I passed a municipal tree trimming service on my way to Starbucks. Lots of trees in the median and along city streets to trim up before spring. During windy weather I always see broken branches and sometimes limbs in the roadway (should I say hazard to autombile drivers?...and probably more frequently than with palms). Turning down one street along the way, I can't help but notice that several of the now large trees that were planted near the sidewalk have now dramatically raised up the sidewalk due to invasive roots. The sidewalk now a tripping hazard. I haven't seen the City do anything about this and it should be addressed. Not addressing this I'm sure makes the tripping hazard more of a liability to the city since it's been known and ignored. We chose palms in our landscaping because we wanted to plant something that wouldn't affect our sidewalk, driveway and house foundation and any drainage lines.

For citiscapes, with sidewalks along streets and little planting areas in between, palms make a good choice for landscaping for many reasons. We looked into small trees for our yard and there weren't many that made our list for various reasons of height, root invasiveness, allergies, leaf debris, etc.

Well I have my piece of paradise and it's created with palms and I don't have to go to Hawaii, etc. to enjoy it year round.

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Silas_Sancona

WestCoastGal,

Believe it or not, if someone trips on such a sidewalk, they can sue the home owner.. a family friend had this happen not too long ago. They had to go through hoops just to get the city of San Jose to issue a permit to remove the tree. Never understood how such a city policy exists.

-Nathan-

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_Keith

I pity anyone with so little a life as to hate a plant. Don't care for someone elses stuff no problem, no need to comment, just move on.

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Phoenikakias

Wow Axel those were some over the top hateful articles you found. Makes you wonder if those writers can hate palms like this what else they hate with such intensity. They might think that palms are ugly but a reading of their words shows another kind of ugliness. I did have to laugh at some of the descriptions made. Also enjoyed reading some of the comments as well. Like the person who pointed out that those shaggy palms along a wilderness trail were homes for animals that fed on rats and bugs keeping those populations in check...so they didn't overrun commercial and residential areas.

I also have to think that most palms are pretty low maintenance which makes them attractive to many. Today I passed a municipal tree trimming service on my way to Starbucks. Lots of trees in the median and along city streets to trim up before spring. During windy weather I always see broken branches and sometimes limbs in the roadway (should I say hazard to autombile drivers?...and probably more frequently than with palms). Turning down one street along the way, I can't help but notice that several of the now large trees that were planted near the sidewalk have now dramatically raised up the sidewalk due to invasive roots. The sidewalk now a tripping hazard. I haven't seen the City do anything about this and it should be addressed. Not addressing this I'm sure makes the tripping hazard more of a liability to the city since it's been known and ignored. We chose palms in our landscaping because we wanted to plant something that wouldn't affect our sidewalk, driveway and house foundation and any drainage lines.

For citiscapes, with sidewalks along streets and little planting areas in between, palms make a good choice for landscaping for many reasons. We looked into small trees for our yard and there weren't many that made our list for various reasons of height, root invasiveness, allergies, leaf debris, etc.

Well I have my piece of paradise and it's created with palms and I don't have to go to Hawaii, etc. to enjoy it year round.

The best so far writting in favor of palms based purely on reason and not personal aesthetic! Thanks a lot!

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WestCoastGal

Nathan, I don't know for certain if these particular trees I referred to are considered a city responsibility or not. They are opposite a tree-lined median and I am sure the city is responsible for mainteance on that land. As for the offending trees, there is commercial property over the walkway berm on the other side of the trees. I'm sure every city is different although there seems to have been a giant push to throw all responsibilites of city sidewalks, parks, etc. onto adjacent property owners. And like you said with limited if any input by the non-city party involved.

In my subdivision the city told the developer they had to put branson pear trees on each newly developed parcel in our section of the development. They are notorious now for being called 10-15 year trees as they tend to have poor branch structure and will suddenly split apart. Our backyard neighbor had his pear tree just split in two last summer. The neighbor across the street saw it happen, no wind, no disease, no kids hanging on the branch, an arborist had trimmed it. Luckily no one was on the sidewalk or had their car parked near it. The city in this case did pay to have the tree part that was sitting in the street disposed of, but our neighbor had to pay to have the tree cut down and removed. Thanks to the city's choice we have probably over a hundred of these trees in the developments in my area. Some are homeowners' responsibilities, others are HOAs' (still homeowners' cost). We can't replace with anything else so will continue to pay over the years. Just an example of poor tree selection by some city official.

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Brahea Axel

Well, in this drought I'm sure any plant requiring excessive water is going to get a bad rep.

The hatred of palms is most likely based on the lack of knowledge people have about them. Most people would be suppressed to know there are more than 10 species of palms let alone thousands. And that this diversity allows for an abundance of forms and uses in the landscape.

I can understand the hatred. I personally have a great distaste for most deciduous plants.

I plant palms because they're low maintenance and they don't use a lot of water, well, at least the ones that serve as my landscape backbone. The deciduous trees that are now all the rage for whatever reason are far bigger water hogs than any palms. I don't hate any plants, I just don't like people who hate palms.

I did hear about the city of Los Angeles who won't replace the dying palms. The argument being that the palms don't filter the air the same way that a live oak would, and they don't produce any shade. All of these arguments have maybe a tiny bit of validity, but they're the work of the native plant nazis that for some reason hate palms even if a species of palm happens to be native.

The fact is, the nursery business in California at least has become anti-tropical. The owner of Monterey Bay nursery tells me that growing tropicals is not good for revenue, because tropicals are very unpopular and don't move. The 60's and 70's featured a pretty strong pro-tropical vibe in California, you see the many Tiki Hawaii style old apt buildings all over the State from that era. But the 80's and 90's ushered in the native plant nazi movement, and that has put an end to the tropical gardening era.

After the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake destroyed downtown Santa Cruz, the City decided to forgo re-planting the many tropical tree species along downtown's main drag. What did they plant instead? Flowering cherry trees! Nope, not native, but a cherry tree is ok in the eye of those types of people. While the City of Capitola to the South of Santa Cruz embraced planting all sorts of palms and tropical trees to really build more of a beach vibe, Santa Cruz was busy turning the City into something that resembles the Pacific Northwest. I really resent the City of Santa Cruz' landscape office, even though the town's main revenue comes from beach tourism, the place doesn't have a beach town vibe at all.

Screw palm haters, They should just move out of the State if they don't like palms. There are plenty of climates that are palm free where these people will be plenty happy.

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Silas_Sancona

^ Couldn't agree more..

Couldn't believe some of the tree suggestions id see on the lists generated by the city. Id often recommend researching a list of other suggestions id make to customers instead of steering them towards things like Bradfords or Sycamores (yes, they were on some of the lists). Several Liquidamber (Sweet Gum) trees lost limbs in a windstorm last summer around the neighborhood my mom was living in. One damaged a car parked in a neighbors driveway.

Since most of the homes on that street are rented, the incident made me wonder who is responsible when something like that happens. Anyway, The suggestions made on the city's lists show another example of very limited knowledge by people who should know much more about the subject, imo. HOAs?, I won't get started, lol

-Nathan-

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Silas_Sancona

Axel, spot on in your statement, and yes, I remember when Capitola started sprucing up the downtown area. First time I came across Cassia leptophylla anywhere north of the L.A. basin.

-Nathan-

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Brahea Axel

Axel, spot on in your statement, and yes, I remember when Capitola started sprucing up the downtown area. First time I came across Cassia leptophylla anywhere north of the L.A. basin.

-Nathan-

Yes, they are just beautiful, they've planted hundreds of these things. And they've planted queens everywhere too, still better than flowering cherry trees.

tree(flowering).jpg

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FNQ Marcus

I've been working for Yuruga Native Plant nursery here in far North Queensland for seven years, and for about 3 years we stopped selling native palms. Not because we didn't want to sell or grow them but because of the 1,000's of plants sold in our retail section per month we would be lucky to sell 1 palm ! So they weren't the effort. When I quized customers about their dislike of palms the answer was always the same. "They're too messy and too much work". That's because up here every established gardens has one of those bloody Golden Cane palms in it, and people are tired of trying to keep them looking neat. As a result when people here think about palms they think of Golden Canes, and lump all palms in the same basket - too messy and too much work.

The good news is that this is showing signs of change, Last year we sold a good number of palms as tube stock and 2013 and this year there has been a strong increase in demand for Licuala ramsayi. So our production of palms will be getting lifted again!!

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DoomsDave

FNQ:

Your comments mirror comments about Washies and CIDPs here. They are a bit of work, but worth it.

Like the golden canes . . . .

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Silas_Sancona

:greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb: ^ Way better than Cherry trees.. Id heard of all the great stuff Santa Cruz removed after the Quake. A dumb move by the city, imo. Nice to see them in Bloom :) Imagine these mixed with Jacarandas and Hong Kong Orchids in some of the neighborhoods around town.. If only. Cassia leptophylla is a great tree.

I hope the two Tabebuia Impetiginosas I planted demonstrate to anyone driving down Camden Ave. what is possible, especially as they get larger and bloom more.

Having spent some time working with natives, I understand the ideal that incorporating them into home landscapes is something everyone should do, if they can. A lot of the stuff that stays nice year round is quite sensitive to the over cared for conditions in must yards. Madrones are a great example.

Other stuff like Redwoods, just isn't going to fit into the average space along most streets. Those which had the misfortune to find themselves there are grotesquely maintained, and sickly. Because most CA natives flower mainly in the spring, most stuff doesn't look all that welcoming once Summer sets in. I don't see how comparing Mexican Fan palms with their natural skirt of dead leaves is anymore unsightly than a bunch of dried up for the year natives. Just gotta shake my head at some people's reasoning sometimes.

-Nathan-

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DoomsDave

Palms are not problem free. ( :bemused:)

Yes, I'm serious.

They can be over- or misued.

A palm that's (way) too big is as much of a problem as an oversized oak, redwood, elephant or roommate. . . . .

Someone posted a nice pic of a car that took a hit from a Royal dead leaf falling on it. To say nothing of the crowns of CIDPs falling off once in a while, in Beverly Hills, the Land of the Litigious.

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FNQ Marcus

For me the Golden Canes will always be a palm of disdain. I've lost count of the number of palms I have and there is not a single one in my collection.

Sorry Dave. :)

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DoomsDave

FNQ, I had a big golden cane that I cut down and it refused to die. I still have one other.

They're much more admired here, though they're prettier in the tropics.

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WestCoastGal

Regardless of tree or palm, it's always about selection of an appropriate plant for the area/space given all the criteria.

I will add that I have bad allergies and pollen/allergies are just horrible in some areas of the country because the decision was made to plant with male trees to avoid the tree fruit litter. Male trees however produce more pollen and thus were overplanted causing a lot of allergy sufferers seasons of misery. Given our climate here where things are always in bloom, it can be quite a concern.

Speaking of sycamores, we have a lot of those planted everywhere, city streets as well as in developments. As mentioned they look half dead come summer and visually are quite unattractive as a result. Really look underwatered. Palms on the other hand look pretty attractive at that time of year, generally flourishing in the summer heat (given the right selection of palms).

Nathan, we frequent the Camden/85 area for dinner or shopping. Where about should I be looking?

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Brad Mondel

Haters gonna hate.

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Silas_Sancona

WCG, if you are headed north on Camden, from Hillsdale, looks towards the right once you get past the light halfway to 85. Both specimens are still small so they may be hard to spot, esp. right now. They're the only thing besides all the Sweet gums that line that section of Camden. Im hoping they didn't get nailed too bad in the freeze you guys had back in December.

As for the other trees you'd mentioned, it sounds like Chinese Pistache which is planted everywhere there.. Great trees but yes, male trees produce tons of pollen. As far as the allergies they can cause, with flowers, tiny flowers tend to produce pollen which is light enough to become airborne, The pollen produced by showier flowers tends to be heavy which is why it takes bees and other insects to disperse it.

DoomsDave, you do have a point, huge palms stuffed into tight spaces don't mix well.. With all the choices available, im sure cities could find easily maintained species to fit most street- scapes though.

Axel, i'll have to get pictures of the countless Royals and Bismarkias they have been installing on either side of i 75 up by Palmetto here.. Pretty sweet layout.


-Nathan-




Edited by Silas_Sancona

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Brahea Axel

WCG, if you are headed north on Camden, from Hillsdale, looks towards the right once you get past the light halfway to 85. Both specimens are still small so they may be hard to spot, esp. right now. They're the only thing besides all the Sweet gums that line that section of Camden. Im hoping they didn't get nailed too bad in the freeze you guys had back in December.

As for the other trees you'd mentioned, it sounds like Chinese Pistache which is planted everywhere there.. Great trees but yes, male trees produce tons of pollen. As far as the allergies they can cause, with flowers, tiny flowers tend to produce pollen which is light enough to become airborne, The pollen produced by showier flowers tends to be heavy which is why it takes bees and other insects to disperse it.

DoomsDave, you do have a point, huge palms stuffed into tight spaces don't mix well.. With all the choices available, im sure cities could find easily maintained species to fit most street- scapes though.

Axel, i'll have to get pictures of the countless Royals and Bismarkias they have been installing on either side of i 75 up by Palmetto here.. Pretty sweet layout.

-Nathan-

So you're gonna rub it in, eh? I remember a swiss friend of mine from childhood, he went to visit the US, he went to both Florida and California. He said Florida was so much nicer because there were so many more palms everywhere. I guess Washingtonias didn't really stand out to him as "palmy". I still chuckle every time I remember that comment. I guess California is Mediterranean, and we don't have the cheap Everglades palm growing grounds that Florida has, not to mention stuff is slow compared to Florida and therefore naturally more expensive.

FNQ, I had a big golden cane that I cut down and it refused to die. I still have one other.

They're much more admired here, though they're prettier in the tropics.

I guess lutescens and Xmas palms are to residents of the tropics what Washingtonia are to Los Angelinos. The main reason many people don't like palms is that washingtonia look like crap most of the time. Here in Santa Cruz the city doesn't groom them so they look even more hideous, especially with their wind torn, half shredded skirts. People take one look at that and say to themselves "why would anyone want to plant THAT in their yard!".

It's still kinda funny how people in California worship lutescens, it's really not that great of a palm in our climate. A nice baronii or onilahensis looks a million times nicer.

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LilikoiLee

Because they're i***s?

I don't have time to read the articles right now so it is likely that I am being too judgmental. I've never hated palms, but am guilty of being oblivious to them for a very long time. I am so addicted now that it is very hard for me understand that sentiment. However, I have met many garden maintenance people who hate palms because they don't like picking up the fronds. I can understand that although personally I find it to be a great joy - the palm is growing and often a gorgeous crownshaft has been revealed.

Lee

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Silas_Sancona

Axel, actually, there is a Mexican Fan palm stuffed shopping center just the road here.. reminds me of San Jose each time I pass it, lol.

If I had a street side project here, my palms of choice would be things like Foxy Ladies, Kentiopsis, and Tri-bears.. and perhaps some Flamethrowers in well suited sites. Would be awesome to see more of all of these around, even if one's eyes can never get enough of blinding silver white Bismarcks.

While it is true that stuff does tend to grow faster here and that land can be easier to come by to grow stuff on, i think that if some of the growers back in CA switched to less common palms, instead of things like Bradfords, Plane trees or Queens, they'd eventually see the rewards in the risk. Again, Foxy Ladies come to mind.

I can easily think of many sidewalk areas around both Santa Cruz and San Jose/Los Gatos which would look awesome dressed up in Kentias, Rohpies, stand out Sabal species and perhaps even some Everglades. Like you had mentioned somewhere else before, think how incredible the Boardwalk would look lined with Parajubea, Jubes, and Beccariophoenix, and other surprises scattered around. Plantings like this would be a great way to further showcase these great choices. Mix in lots of leafy stuff, some flowering shrubs/smaller trees, and perhaps some interesting succulents and people will be asking for them at the nurseries in no time. Can't tell you how many customers would come into where I worked after a trip down south asking about various plants not seen enough further north. Most were shocked to learn that such plants would survive the winters in San Jose and Santa Cruz.

-Nathan-

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Sabal Steve

I've always liked palms, they've reminded me of sunshine. I think one of our frequent posters from Ohio (or Iowa perhaps) said something similar. I've definitely grown to appreciate them more since joining Palmtalk. Most of this hatred is out of palm ignorance in my opinion - people just don't know much about palms other than what the big boxes sell. Most people can't even tell you the name of a Washies, Queens, or CIDP's when they see one on the street/sidewalk/yard. Palm re-education camps - they're the only way:)

Also, I think I read a while back on one of PT's topics that San Diego was planning on doing away with palms as street trees. Jacarandas perhaps. Normally I'd object, but if they help eventually hide the pawn shops, 99 cent stores, lavenderias, adult book stores, and strip clubs painted in purple and pink on my block, I'm all for it.

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Brahea Axel

I've always liked palms, they've reminded me of sunshine. I think one of our frequent posters from Ohio (or Iowa perhaps) said something similar. I've definitely grown to appreciate them more since joining Palmtalk. Most of this hatred is out of palm ignorance in my opinion - people just don't know much about palms other than what the big boxes sell. Most people can't even tell you the name of a Washies, Queens, or CIDP's when they see one on the street/sidewalk/yard. Palm re-education camps - they're the only way:)

Also, I think I read a while back on one of PT's topics that San Diego was planning on doing away with palms as street trees. Jacarandas perhaps. Normally I'd object, but if they help eventually hide the pawn shops, 99 cent stores, lavenderias, adult book stores, and strip clubs painted in purple and pink on my block, I'm all for it.

Hey Steve, why would you want to strip (pun intended) North Park of its charm?

Funny thing is, part of me planting palms is to learn to appreciate the rainy, humid side of Santa Cruz County. We're on the windward side of the Mountains, we get 10 inches of rain alone in the Summer from the fog drizzle at night, and 50-100 inches of rain during the rainy season on normal years. The forests around here are full of streams and fern grottos. Palms love it, no yellowing up here on normal years, this is the first year I've seen yellowing on some of my palms, they're not used to dry sunshine in the middle of Winter. In the rain shadow of the Santa Cruz Mountains is a desert, downtown San Jose gets only 13 inches a year, just a tiny bit more than Los Angeles. When it's gloomy in Santa Cruz, I think of the Hilo side of th big island of Hawaii, the palms love the moisture and look good. The palms chase off the gloom because they make everything look warm and tropical.

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Alberto

"Is it me, or has there been an outbreak of palm trees in our city"?

......if there is an outbreak of palms in his city this means a lot of folks love palms and planted them ...and he is one of the few who dislike them.....

BTW the beautifull Cassia leptophylla is a companion tree of Syagrus romanzoffiana. Both are native in the araucaria forests from south Brazil. I think there will be a time that this trees (they can grow to real giants) ,with the big seed pods fallen on the ground everywhere will be hatred by some people also.....

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jacksparly

I never knew that people hate palm trees..I don,t say that I dislike palm trees but,I hate palm trees in places where snow can fall and last. In general though, I quite like palm trees in the right location. When I was a kid, I loved palm trees and one of my neghbiour bought me two palm plants to put in the garden. I had one to this day but, it died recently.

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