Jump to content
jfrye01@live.com

Worried about my Trachy...

Recommended Posts

jfrye01@live.com

I'm not sure how much I'm supposed to water her (it?) :P ...I'm watering every other day with a half gallon watering can, don't know if this is too much or not enough...my palm is about 4 feet tall with a foot or so of trunk, currently potted in the house. I want her to be nice and healthy when I plant her this spring...the tips of a couple of fronds are drying out...I don't want her to shrivel up and die, I'm new to this, any ideas? Thanks! (I tend to personify my palms, maybe I'm nuts? :P )

(Here's a picture of my Trachy taken about 3 minutes ago, healthy, or too dark?)

post-9451-0-25501600-1390020059_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

I am thinking that is too much water. Water when it starts to dry out, only. Also, get that thing outside every chance you get. If it is over 32, put it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kahili

That is way too much water. Don't be afraid to let the soil dry out. Think of it this way: roots need oxygen to grow and stay healthy. When you water, water displaces oxygen, but when the soil is allowed to dry out-oxygen is allowed back in the soil. In the winter, with my palms/plants that are inside-I may only water them once every 10 days or so. They get pretty dry before I water them again.

The best way to water container plants is to water them well and then let them dry out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Agree with all of the above. More palms die from overwatering than lack of water. Everything I've read indicates this is one tough palm. Leaves could be drying out from low humidity due to central heat. Low humidity can promote infestations of red spider mites. Definitely let it go outdoors when days are clear and above freezing. This palm makes a poor houseplant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mauna Kea Cloudforest

That palm belongs outside in the ground, even in KS. You only need to protect it when it's below 25F. They do much better when exposed to some cold. Ideally, they need some diurnal temperature fluctuation, they thrive on cool nights and warm days but will grow through most of your Fall and Spring weather, you just need to cover and protect with lights when the forecast says 20F and below.

I just looked at your forecast, the entire week looks like good trachy weather, 25F low with 47F high, the trachy could care less about. The way things are going now looks like you will love and smother that palm to death, it will suffer from being pampered.

If you want an indoor palm, you're better off growing a chamadorea or a kentia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Alright thanks for the replies! I'm thinking today's a good day to put it into the ground!! Any planting tips? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Alright thanks for the replies! I'm thinking today's a good day to put it into the ground!! Any planting tips? :)

My tip is let the roots dry out some, give it all the outside time it can get now, but wait till mid-April to plant after the soils warm up a bit. It is likely already suffering from some degree of root rot. In cold soils, they will likely just rot more, and not regenerate and start to grow. They will just rot more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WestCoastGal

Nice young trachy there. Overwatering can produce fungus and bacteria in the soil and rot or kill your plant as well as from the lack of oxygen mentioned. I only have one small potted palm right now and can lift it and get a sense of how wet or dry it is. I'm keeping it outside as much as possible now that our freezing temps seem to be behind us. Most nights here are now in the mid or upper 30s to 40s.

From your photo the fronds look green to me. Are you seeing any yellowing at all from overwatering?

We refer to our palms as females as well, regardless of species. I'm waiting to find out what my 4 Chamaedorea microspadix will be and may have to revise that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Mondel

-I'd wait until spring to plant it.

-Keep the crown dry by watering only the root zone.

-Allow the soil to dry out a bit between waterings.

I wish I had known these three things when I was younger...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

No yellowing so far, a couple of the bottom fronds are pretty dry feeling...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kahili

Definitely wait until the night temps are in the 30's or above -late spring for you? before you plant it. Leave it outside in the sun and just take it inside on nights that are below 25 degrees. When you do plant it, try to plant it where it will be in full sun in the summer-you will get twice the growth each year than if you plant it in the shade or part shade. After you plant it, be sure to fertilize with a good slow release fert as soon as the soil temps warm up to 50-60 degrees. You have a short window of growth for the palm each year and fert will help it get established faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

post-9451-0-88222600-1390173226_thumb.jp

Here's where I put my Trachy today, however, when I plant this spring, I am thinking about putting it to the right of the birdbath. Question is, is mulch ok to surround the base with, or will it encourage rot? Also, this spot is protected by afternoon sun by the house, as I believe here in Kansas, the very hot summer temperatures (90-100F) plus direct afternoon sun would bake the palm...any comments, ideas, criticism?:) I've learned a lot from this community!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Mondel

That sounds like a good spot.

In my opinion mulch shouldn't bother the base, it is beneficial to the roots since it will keep them cool and moist in the summer and warm in the winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Definitely mulch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kahili

The afternoon sun isn't going to bother it. I have had trachys in the ground here in Raleigh in full sun for over 20 yrs and I think our summers are as hot as what you get. It has been my experience that trachys in the sun grow twice as fast as ones in shade or part shade-so thats one factor to consider. But you also have to think about the winters and protecting it (possibly) and planting it on your south side up against the house is your best micro climate for warmth/wind in the winter. I would get another one and plant one out in the open where it gets full sun and one up near the south side of the house and see which does better. It would be interesting to see

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

That's a good idea. I have another one coming in the mail, it is much smaller though. In your experience, how many years does it take a 1-2 foot tall trachy to begin trunking?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

We've had 20+ mph winds from the north today, and I'm noticing the leaf tips are drooping on the north (left in the picture) side of the palm...will the gusty wind conditions in Kansas be a problem for this palm? :/

post-9451-0-59188800-1390261388_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben in Norcal

Windmills can get a bit roughed up in windy conditions. If you are interested in a palm with similar hardiness and takes wind better, look at the T. Wagnerianus.

Since your windmill is still in a pot, I'd move inside in strong winds. And, eventually plant out with some wind protection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kahili

It's hard to say how fast your palm will grow as I think that you are quite a bit colder than Raleigh overall throughout the year, but I know that one Trachy (that was about the size of yours) that I planted in 2004 has a trunk of 12 feet or more right now and that one gets full sun. Another one that I planted that was twice the size but got am shade has a trunk of maybe 8' (?) , maybe taller and that was planted around 2006. One that I planted in 1992 that gets mostly shade trunk is only about 8'. I have never protected any of them and they have seen temps as low as 8 degrees and many nights throughout the years of 17 degrees , just had a cold blast where it was 11 degrees and getting ready to repeat that tonight. We had a lot of wind with that last blast of cold the other wk and will have same tonight, and so far all the trachys look fine.

If you plant close to the house you will get some protection from wind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Usually, we see winter lows in the 20s...However, it is not uncommon for the temperatures to drop to the single digits or even the negatives...I guess we'll see how she does around here:) Thanks for all the help, everyone:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

This picture below shows an area where my mom and I are brainstorming about starting a "palm garden"...we are selling the camper this spring and are thinking about planting the palms (My trachy(s), S. minors, needles, and a pindo or two) right there, and landscaping around them. It's hard to tell, but directly behind the camper is east and to the left is north...would those trees provide enough wind and cold protection in winter? And would they block too much light in the summer? Also, this area of the yard tends to get a bit swampy after heavy rains, but could this problem be alleviated by raising the garden a couple feet by backfilling with dirt? Ideas, comments, constructive criticism, or even telling me I'm downright insane:Ppost-9451-0-90935400-1390422081_thumb.jp...all comments are welcome;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Noticed my Trachy has a petiole that is turning a yellow color, and I am worried...I'll post a picture when I get home, any ideas what could be causing this?:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

post-9451-0-67523100-1390855160_thumb.jppost-9451-0-12519100-1390855210_thumb.jp

First picture is petiole yellowing...sorry the pic is turned sideways...second pic is tips of fronds turning brown...is this normal, or is my palm in danger?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Is it the oldest leaf? Older palm leaves die off normally - just the way the plant grows. If the other leaves are okay you probably have nothing to worry about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

They all have somewhat brown tips on them, however, the older ones are very brown...the yellow petiole on one of the newer fronds is concerning me most...but honestly, I'm not sure what I'm looking at. Haha...

Here's a picture of the top of the palm...post-9451-0-53515500-1390857025_thumb.jp

Edited by jfrye01@live.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

I've noticed also some small insects in the wood chips around the base, and around the fibers on the trunk...they're very small, some are white and some are black...anybody know what these are?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Just happened to notice this thread too. I've been commenting on your other thread...

Based on your history of watering, yeah, you should give it some time to dry. But a few days in a row of water or rain isn't going to kill your palm.

Some have mentioned fertilizing right when you plant. Others on this forum will disagree and argue the palm will adjust better if no fertilizer is added right away. I have mixed thoughts. I would avoid fertilizing in Fall. You don't want to encourage new and tender growth when frosts are coming.

Keith is right, as much as possible, get that thing outside when temps permit.

You will absolutely have to protect your palm in winter once planted. I would plant near the house in the southside to protect from the cold north winds. Even then you should plan to build protection for it. Planting it out in the open is taking a tough task and making it tougher. There is a guy who grows in Iowa, one in Wisconsin and one recently in NYC. Might try checking out their threads and how they handle winters.

Your raised bed or mound planting idea is a solid one. It will be good for your palm.

Mulch is a must. But be sure you don't mound the mulch against the trunk. Finally, if you can cover the root zone with dark rocks or plant it near a dark boulder or two that may help as well. Creating heat syncs in winter is very important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Mondel

Just happened to notice this thread too. I've been commenting on your other thread...

Based on your history of watering, yeah, you should give it some time to dry. But a few days in a row of water or rain isn't going to kill your palm.

Some have mentioned fertilizing right when you plant. Others on this forum will disagree and argue the palm will adjust better if no fertilizer is added right away. I have mixed thoughts. I would avoid fertilizing in Fall. You don't want to encourage new and tender growth when frosts are coming.

Keith is right, as much as possible, get that thing outside when temps permit.

You will absolutely have to protect your palm in winter once planted. I would plant near the house in the southside to protect from the cold north winds. Even then you should plan to build protection for it. Planting it out in the open is taking a tough task and making it tougher. There is a guy who grows in Iowa, one in Wisconsin and one recently in NYC. Might try checking out their threads and how they handle winters.

Your raised bed or mound planting idea is a solid one. It will be good for your palm.

Mulch is a must. But be sure you don't mound the mulch against the trunk. Finally, if you can cover the root zone with dark rocks or plant it near a dark boulder or two that may help as well. Creating heat syncs in winter is very important.

Some really good advice take into account!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WestCoastGal

Your poor trachy sure is coming under attack...first from the cats. Regarding the little bugs you see, I wonder if they might be spider mites? They can happen outdoors but can really explode in population indoors during the winter where it's heated and low humidity, which I assume is the case being Kansas and going thru a really cold period now with your heat on. I had a beautiful potted Fatsia japonica indoors during the winter many years ago that got decimated by them before I could successful treat the plant. I'm thinking the color difference could be the age difference of the mite. I'm sure someone here can offer up the best way to treat a palm if they think it's spider mites. I remember kind of quarantining it, spraying it and trying to clean the underside of the leaves where they tend to feed on the leaves.

I don't know that your palm tips browning a little is a problem. My trachy is planted and the new fronds are green at the tips but will brown a bit on the ends even outside. In your case it could be due to the dry heated air inside. The tips would be the first to dry up. Do you know what your humidity level is inside the house where you have the palm? A cool spot still getting light would be the best location for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WestCoastGal

Regarding your plans to set up a palm area near the trees, if you are planning on setting up protection structures, do you have a good way to get electricity out there...for warming C9 lights, etc. in addition to the basic structure? Seems like a really long distance...and you should also be looking at some type of in-use electrical cover to protect your circuits. I'd also be concerned about animals chewing on the cord.

Personally I would plant my palms around the house to take advantage of the reflective heat from it. Some palms like trachys don't like a lot of wind and will end up looking kind of ratty. Our neighbor has a T fortunei that has pretty stiff fronds and does well in the wind path that runs between our yards. We planted a T fortunei that has a more droopy frond structure and placed it in a backyard bed along our fence line (maybe 20 ft distance from the house). We situated it in the middle of our house's footprint thinking it had wind protection from the house from the winds that routinely come from the direction of the front of the house. It still seemes affected by the wind anyway. Both of the trachy' canopies are now well above the fence line. Honestly, our trachy is our least favorite looking palm in our yard due to the appearance of the fronds. Wish ours was more like our neighbor's....just some food for thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Here's some pictures...Fortunately, the cat has only been peeing in one spot, and now she is being confined to one room in the house...she's only 3-4 months old, so hopefully since she's young, her urine isn't extremely potent...As for the other issues, here's some pictures...First one is near the bottom of the crown...second is the tip of a frond...how does it look? post-9451-0-27283900-1391020606_thumb.jp

post-9451-0-72758300-1391020720_thumb.jp

I'm not sure of the humidity indoors, our furnace does have a built in humidifier, though...I'm really worried I'm gonna lose my $150 palm:/ Any ways I can kill the bugs and save it?:/ It's far too cold for it to go outside, to answer an earlier question, I am in zone 6b, the temperatures have hovered around 20F for the past 3-4 days...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

If it's spider mites , I would mix up a solution of soapy water in a spray bottle and let 'em have it. You may have to spray several times to do the job.

Try to avoid having water sit too long in the crown if/when you do spray. If you are concerned about water/rot in the crown, pour a little hydrogen peroxide on the crown. It should help a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

What would be the best kind of soap to use? I'm not sure it's spider mites, but would the soap solution kill other insects as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

post-9451-0-17486900-1391140803_thumb.jpAnyone know what is causing these yellow/brown spots?:/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

What would be the best kind of soap to use? I'm not sure it's spider mites, but would the soap solution kill other insects as well?

Pretty much any hand soap, dish soap that is liquid. You can mix and match. Add to water, shake well and spray. Yes, it should kill other pests as well. I use it on mealy bugs and white fly. Much safer for humans and pets that an insecticide. Works like a charm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

photo (8).JPGAnyone know what is causing these yellow/brown spots?:/

Hard to know for sure. The leaf tips just appear to be typical drying from lack of humidity.

Roots take up moisture. Leaves expel it. If environmental conditions are dry the roots may not be able to keep pace with the leaves no matter what you do. Especially true of potted plants. Roots are restricted and not as developed as they might be in the ground. Makes it harder for them to keep pace with the leaves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Now I'm noticing something else, tiny little holes in the leaflets...anyone know what could cause this?:/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Also, I found what looked like a small amount of mold on one of the petioles...is it too late to save the palm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfrye01@live.com

Here's some pictures...the dirt where I put the cayenne pepper is also molding...some fronds are completely dead, the others have small brown holes in them...

Sorry they're sideways...

post-9451-0-08354300-1391533362_thumb.jppost-9451-0-34553900-1391533393_thumb.jppost-9451-0-88948300-1391533420_thumb.jppost-9451-0-43880100-1391533441_thumb.jppost-9451-0-93905200-1391533579_thumb.jppost-9451-0-07767600-1391533608_thumb.jppost-9451-0-48159400-1391533628_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Mondel

That's not mold on the stems; it's called tomentum. It's a natural fiber tachycarpus have on their petioles.

The dead frond on the bottom is also a natural process, just trim it off...

I would remove the pepper and allow the soil to dry out between waterings.

Otherwise, it will be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...