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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

Cold hardy dypsis

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Alicehunter2000

The triangle shown above did not make it through the Polar Vortex and Great Ice Storm two winters ago.

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Ben in Norcal

I don't believe D. lutescens could take much below high-20s, anywhere.

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Laaz

Never tied it, but I see a few sites listing it as hardy to low 20's.

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Tropicdoc

lutescens fried for me at 28 with frost.

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Sandy Loam

sounds like you are in zone 9B ?

No, 9a.

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Zeeth

Lutescens is a tricky one because it's actually pretty sensitive but grows back from the roots. I've seen them eek out a living in inland Tampa, but they never develop the multiple 20 foot tall canes like you'll see in the coconut zones. I'd rate them about the same hardiness as coconuts if you want them to look good. 

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Sandy Loam

For example, giant dypsis lutenscs in Tampa, FL: 

 

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Zeeth

For example, giant dypsis lutenscs in Tampa, FL: 

 

Try attaching the picture again. I've had some trouble since switching to the new format but it seems to help to refresh the page.

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Sandy Loam

Sorry, one more try ---

Here is a Dypsis Lutencens in Tampa, Florida, which must be 20 feet tall.  It has been there for years:

https://www.google.com/maps/@27.9331533,-82.4768766,3a,37.5y,56.99h,95.62t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1spuUun_CHXLwG431oMh778w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

In Orlando, I have seen these trees being used as a privacy hedge -- a practice much more common throughout South Florida, of course.  

 

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Zeeth

Sorry, one more try ---

Here is a Dypsis Lutencens in Tampa, Florida, which must be 20 feet tall.  It has been there for years:

https://www.google.com/maps/@27.9331533,-82.4768766,3a,37.5y,56.99h,95.62t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1spuUun_CHXLwG431oMh778w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

In Orlando, I have seen these trees being used as a privacy hedge -- a practice much more common throughout South Florida, of course.  

 

That's a nice one. It's in one of the warmer spots of Tampa for sure. 

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Moose

 

Interesting that Dypsis plumose has not been mentioned in this thread?

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Sutter Bob

Tried lutescens once here a few years back with light cover - wiped out.

Don't think I'll try again.

This is a great time of year here for the surviving palms. Last growth before the freezes hit.

An ambositae just opened a new leaf.

A couple of months and out come the pruners.

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_Keith
On 11/4/2015, 7:14:39, Moose said:

 

Interesting that Dypsis plumose has not been mentioned in this thread?

We may be mentioning it next year Moose.  In my Zone 9a garden, I do have one spot that might be 9b, for a few years anyway.  The palm will eventually grow to its death, but it will have to exceed 18 feet to get there.   We'll see.  I have until spring 16 to decide.

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Sr. Califas

Lutescens, do well in here in inland SoCal. I've seen a full grown, flowering specimen in nearby Montclair at a house that did not seem to be owned by a palm "collector." At my house and my parent's house in Upland we both have small Lutescens in their second winter in the ground. The below picture is the one at my house in zip code 91784, usually a zone 9b. Last year these plants had more of a challenge adapting to full sun and both mine and my parent's did so successfully.

As far as D. plumosas I have around 5 in large pots unprotected around the yard and they have done very well. I have only lost 1 out of 9 in the past 3 years. think they are a winner for both sun and cold.

 

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Sr. Califas

Here are some of the plants referenced in the previous post, Both at my house, Upland, Ca. elevation approx 1900 feet.

smaller2.jpg

Smaller.jpg

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Sr. Califas

Dypsis lancelota has been very solid for me as well. I have 3 at my house which were planted up into 15 gallon containers 3 years ago which have now rooted out. They seem to show no affects from the cold. My house has seen temps down to at least 25 F the last few winters.They just sit in  a planter that has old, large pygmy date palm canopy. In fact they are starting to grow into more sun light and seem to be adjusting well. This spring I plan to put my largest one in the ground. 

At my parent's house there is one lancelota  spending its 3rd winter, second in the ground, at the side of the house. It was planted as an overgrown 15 gallon spring of 2014. Its tallest cane is around 12' high and has grown out of any protection. The thing grows like a weed. Another one right next to t in a 10 gallon pot is growing very fast and strong too, although it's adjusting to growing into more sun.

If surviving sub 30 temps qualifies as cold hardy then I would have to include lancelota, though my data set of 3 winters is relatively short.

Different angles of the D. lance at my parent's house, Upland Ca. Pictures taken Oct. 31 2014, plant is even bigger and greener now.

smaller.jpg

smaller2.jpg

smaller1.jpg

Edited by Sr. Califas
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