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Brad Mondel

That's great! That's the idea I had when starting my grafts. I just recently grafted a white diana Syriacus into a pink one and it was successful. So now it will bloom pink and white!

My hybrid coccineus will bloom In a few weeks this year. I cannot wait to share it with you guys! 

 

I should try to graph more hibiscus onto my tree form since non of the other colors took besides purple. I have a new white arnnotianus Hawaiian species that I will graph onto a standard root stock once it gets some size to it. 

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Hillizard
25 minutes ago, Brad Mondel said:

That's great! That's the idea I had when starting my grafts. I just recently grafted a white diana Syriacus into a pink one and it was successful. So now it will bloom pink and white!

My hybrid coccineus will bloom In a few weeks this year. I cannot wait to share it with you guys! 

 

I should try to graph more hibiscus onto my tree form since non of the other colors took besides purple. I have a new white arnnotianus Hawaiian species that I will graph onto a standard root stock once it gets some size to it. 

Brad: Yes, when I saw the tropical Hibiscus graft pictures you shared awhile ago, I got the bug to do some again myself since I already had a standard.

If I remember correctly, H.arnottianus blooms constantly and has a slight fragrance too, so that's a good choice. And H. coccineus puts on quite a show, whether the red or white form. Looking forward to your pictures! ^_^

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Silas_Sancona

Not quite sure how i forgot to share this one here.. Not a hybrid this time but a Hibiscus species..  Specifically, H. cardiophylla / phyllus **also known as  Hibiscus martianus ** Texas native which, when happy,  can be a medium- sized bushy perennial. Great plant and fairly hardy ( to about 20F *top growth.  Slightly lower, into the upper teens, *Roots ) but sometimes a bit temperamental. Likes gritty, well -drained soil and will rot in Clay / if kept too wet, esp. when cool. Flowers almost continuously from mid April ( here ) until the start of Fall ( mid - September -'ish )

Flowers may not be huge for a Hibiscus, but mighty colorful they are.. Leaves are green and fuzzy.
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Silas_Sancona

A couple pics of one of my favorite hybrids/ cultivars.. A weeping-type whose flowers are simple enough, but with lots of flare. Can't recall the exact cultivar name.. Tag has long since faded. Picked up in FL. Might be "Hawaiian Salmon"  don't hold me to that, lol..  Keep thinking  " " ..Sunset was somewhere in the name but .. Anyway,  been holding its own thru the heat here.. in shade of course.    Need to re pot / take some cuttings later on.
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Brad Mondel

20190601_125527.thumb.jpg.79b6d7080e012dcb38d6997fee621261.jpgwhite versicolor standard

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Brad Mondel

20180704_105052.thumb.jpg.a868e76818daa005349493e727903a82.jpgThis is my hybrid. It has beautiful large flowers with a long staminal colomn which I like but the flowers buckle under their own weight. 

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mike-coral gables

One of my favorites, “Figi Island “ blooming profusely in my yard  this time of year  .

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Tracy

I like the color on this Hibiscus which HVO (Hidden Valley Orchids) named "Delectable".  Depending on the season it can be a subtle lavender or the color below.

20190602-104A3669.jpg

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jimmyt

You peeps make me jealous mad.  Wishing I could get tropical hibiscus to grow like yours in my climate.  I am lucky to get them to do decent in pots.  Beautiful flowers to all of you though.

Keep them growing and showing.  They are magnificent. :drool:

jimmyt

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Silas_Sancona
46 minutes ago, jimmyt said:

You peeps make me jealous mad.  Wishing I could get tropical hibiscus to grow like yours in my climate.  I am lucky to get them to do decent in pots.  Beautiful flowers to all of you though.

Keep them growing and showing.  They are magnificent. :drool:

jimmyt

Right now, mine are in pots also.. Had brought 5 other cultivars with me here but lost them to our heat.. Wouldn't even think of planting this one.. At least not until out of the desert..

 

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Hillizard

I just picked this 7-inches-wide flower today off my grafted Hibiscus standard. It's called "Caramel Dawn" and I think you'll agree the name is quite appropriate! :happy:

Hibiscus_CaramelDawn.png

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Tracy

Glitz-n-Glitter which I got from HVO a couple of year's ago is blooming despite some heavy June Gloom on the coast here in Leucadia.

20190616-104A3959.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
4 hours ago, Hillizard said:

I just picked this 7-inches-wide flower today off my grafted Hibiscus standard. It's called "Caramel Dawn" and I think you'll agree the name is quite appropriate! :happy:

Hibiscus_CaramelDawn.png

Next to Blue / Purple, really like Brown colored Hibiscus.. Will keep this cultivar in mind when i re-build my collection..  Really want to find "Black Jack", "Mystic Brown," "Hiawatha," "Pleiades", and "Chad"..

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Hillizard
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Next to Blue / Purple, really like Brown colored Hibiscus.. Will keep this cultivar in mind when i re-build my collection..  Really want to find "Black Jack", "Mystic Brown," "Hiawatha," "Pleiades", and "Chad"..

I'm certain http://www.socalhibiscussociety.org/about/ will be happy to have you as a member and refer you to sources of those cultivars! ;)

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Hillizard

My Hibiscus syriacus 'Diana' in bloom today. This is a great cold-hardy, sterile triploid that usu. doesn't produce any seeds and has lots of flowers over the summer months.

HibiscusDiana.png

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Nj Palms

I feel dwarfed by the beauty of the other flowers compared to mine lol.

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krishnaraoji88

Halema’uma’u BeautyE85B1977-CF5F-4338-8121-C52CA87580B8.thumb.jpeg.088c60a508eb510a6b9607d513e53063.jpeg

 

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Zeeth

Sea Spray (the leaves are also quite interesting shaped; they're trilobed. I also have Tropical Spritz, which has similar leaf shape (but hasn't flowered yet). 

IMG_20191103_075536.jpg

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Turtlesteve

I just finally got through this thread.  I'm just getting into hibiscus, and really like the look of large hibiscus (e.g. tree size - we lived near some in California that were 25-30' tall).  I've got a few varieties of syriacus, but they mostly can't compare, and there seems to be comparably little interest or motivation from hybridizers to improve them (all the effort is going towards the perennial hybrids).

@Brad Mondel it would be nice to chat some time on your hybridization efforts.  There is at least one record I've found of a successful hybrid of syriacus and rosa-sinensis, and with all the other species out there, there is certainly the possibility to find other hybridization options.

Steve

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Butch

No idea what it is, but it's been growing in my garden for about 20yrs...

 

cyk4IC0.jpg

 

Butch

 

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pietropuccio

'Fiesta', 'Lady Cilento', 'Red Robin'

image.jpeg.32052ed7e67c97aa1111464047fb7da3.jpeg

image.jpeg.300178993fa717cb6fba0eafff644a15.jpeg

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pietropuccio

'Sylvia Goodman', 'Tahitian Orange Jubilee'

image.jpeg.ec9a62f9af8f029fcdb33df2d497325d.jpeg

image.jpeg.8a77dffb9e9a86aac240bdc1933527ad.jpeg

 

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Silas_Sancona

A standout NOID that had been brought in w/ a bunch of standard /regular Hibiscus where i used to work in Sarasota. Thought i'd added it here some time ago. Wish i knew the cultivar name ( let alone grabbed it when i had the chance ).
895716122_121515082571.thumb.jpg.aba28864b2c0adf1e51d2c3b5cdd5208.jpg

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DoomsDave
On 12/9/2013 at 12:31 PM, Firepalm said:

Hey Adam,

 

I second Dave's opinion on this, you can prune them back hard and they will come raging back. I cut an eight year old plant down to almost nothing earlier this year (had planned to completely take it out but never got around to it), it looks like a brand new plant now, much thicker and healthier looking. Unfortunately the battle against white fly at my place is constant regardless of how much sun I put them in.

I still get the whitefly once in a while, especially on shaded leaves out of the wind. But it's not the horrific scourge it used to be. I think someone imported a natural enemy.

Now, if someone could just do that for the Red Palm Weevil and similar horrahs, we'll be better for that, too!

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Nolannorthbay

Has anyone already researched predatory insects that could control Red Palm Weevil? The array of beneficial insects available for sale is getting pretty impressive these days.

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mnorell
9 hours ago, Nolannorthbay said:

Has anyone already researched predatory insects that could control Red Palm Weevil? The array of beneficial insects available for sale is getting pretty impressive these days.

There are lots of predators including many non-insects, such as several birds and also rats! See here: An Overview on the Natural Enemies of Rhynchophorus

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Komang

Some of mine :36_14_15[1]:

Survive after hot summer

 

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Butch

Time to resurrect the pretty flowers :rolleyes:...

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Butch

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Tracy

Last weekend my wife and I were out for a walk and I saw this fantastic hibiscus.  The resident was leaving the home in a car so I was tempted to ask about it, but she looked hurried so I didn't.  Some other time when I'm walking if I see someone in the yard, I intend to ask about it.  It has a different leaf form and the stamen is a bit different as well.  Anyone familiar with this variety?  It is in a high visibility spot, growing in the yard of the home on the NW corner of Leucadia Blvd. and Hymetus which has all the in ground Howea forsteriana's commercially planted.

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Silas_Sancona
7 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Last weekend my wife and I were out for a walk and I saw this fantastic hibiscus.  The resident was leaving the home in a car so I was tempted to ask about it, but she looked hurried so I didn't.  Some other time when I'm walking if I see someone in the yard, I intend to ask about it.  It has a different leaf form and the stamen is a bit different as well.  Anyone familiar with this variety?  It is in a high visibility spot, growing in the yard of the home on the NW corner of Leucadia Blvd. and Hymetus which has all the in ground Howea forsteriana's commercially planted.

20200621_091504_resized.jpg

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That's a Hibiscus syriacus, aka Rose of Sharon cultivar.. Nice specimen too..  One of those " Hibiscus " grown in colder climates ( hardy to below zero ).. Usually trouble free, but can a bit more vigorous than some of the tropical Hibiscus varieties can be.. Supposedly can produce seed but don't recall being able to find any on plants in CA.  Numerous colors, ..single, double, multi-petaled forms /  named cultivars.. Should be pretty easy to find in nurseries / ordered online.. Same basic growing requirements / fertilizer requirements as tropical Hibiscus.

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Brad Mondel

20200628_092723.thumb.jpg.b978f21a654cab5a3a150da0940bba73.jpg20200627_175250.thumb.jpg.4aac4d4674682fc2b6a62820f03313b1.jpg20200627_152419.thumb.jpg.83e44b0b6f7706bb88d38f85d221c642.jpg20200627_104840.thumb.jpg.21708b95648ecf265763a57940f16f9b.jpg

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Brad Mondel

Hibiscus coccineus, my favorite hardy Hibiscus!20200710_120621.thumb.jpg.59508b6345c5d1657e939bf3fe1a72aa.jpg20200710_120611.thumb.jpg.8df7210a11b954c2091ac592dbb6ddf6.jpg

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palmsOrl

Saw this pretty yellow hibiscus at the Home Depot last week all by itself and decided that it would look perfect in this empty spot in the yard lined with hibiscus.  The flower had started to fade but the plant is covered with buds so it should really take off once in the ground.

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Silas_Sancona
3 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

Hibiscus coccineus, my favorite hardy Hibiscus!20200710_120621.thumb.jpg.59508b6345c5d1657e939bf3fe1a72aa.jpg20200710_120611.thumb.jpg.8df7210a11b954c2091ac592dbb6ddf6.jpg

Nice.. You ever get seed from these, or any of your other species Hibiscus?

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Brad Mondel
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Nice.. You ever get seed from these, or any of your other species Hibiscus?

Yes, and I breed my own hybrids as well.

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Patrick

I forget the species, but It does set viable seed and the flowers are stunners! Cold hardy too, as it dies back every year. I have this growing in my pond.

IMG_20200710_154933.jpg

Edited by Patrick
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Brad Mondel

New hybrids this year in the fields: 

20200725_082905.thumb.jpg.2e3eaaae8d0b2f2d50ee11e09bfcf67b.jpg20200725_081745.thumb.jpg.3d7cfb6ac31c04450bffb81e207ac7e7.jpg20200725_080109.thumb.jpg.c5a6486aff22edc21603f8f2a25ef8c0.jpg20200725_080313.thumb.jpg.ff71a6de54e45814a008f78b3027a1d9.jpg

Edited by Brad Mondel
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Manalto

H. syriacus seedling selected for its subtle pale pink color.

00100lrPORTRAIT_00100_BURST20200726121511199_COVER.thumb.jpg.1aae82d6fcbbf12b0847ac4b5b03c5bc.jpg

Tropical hibiscus in my favorite saturated orange, $4.99 at Walmart.IMG_20200326_102406.thumb.jpg.b1c52e85564befb7a938ead66e90cf49.jpg

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