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ghar41

Palm Book

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ghar41

I've been very impressed with the book Cold Hardy Palms by Alan W Meerow. I have found the information very helpful with lots of examples of cold hardy palms. Much better than the coffee table type palm books you see floating around this one has specific information about nutritional needs, propagating seed, disease problems and much much more. It is obviously well researched and I recommend it to my cold hardy friends out there.

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Sabal Steve

No replies? Really?

Bump!

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Brahea Axel

I agree, this book deserves some comments. The problem goes back to what I've mentioned before about the poor and vague definition of what "Cold Hardy" means. In the past, I've always looked at "cold hardy" as referring to those people trying to grow palms outside of the usual palm belt, usually the 8b to barely 9a hardiness rating. But Steve's comment prompted me to want to check out the book.

Turns out the book covers palms below USDA 10a, it covers 82 species, although I know there are more than 82 species that survive in 9b and colder. I tried to find a table of content and wasn't able to find one. I did find this web site that is associated with the book: http://www.coldhardypalms.com/availability/ColdHardy.asp, which lists the classic 50 or so hardy palms that grow in USDA 9a, but it doesn't even list parajubaea. But it has howea fosteriana. Unfortunately, unless the author enables the "preview" mode on Amazon or at least makes the table of contents available, I will pass on ordering the book.

I am pretty sure this book won't cover our climate, as pretty much zero palm books ever cover cool Summer mild Winter climates around the world.

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monkeyranch

Great book to loan to people first becoming curious about cold hardy palms. It's a thorough, and concise summary of hardy palms which is well organized as to not be too overwhelming for a beginner. Enough info for more advance palmophiles to reference regularly. I find it particularly useful for pointing out palms when presenting the "Intro to Cold Hardy Palms 101" talk to people. Nice array of photos with a overall shots of entire mature palm and detail images for each species and often a pic of juvenile examples. While written primarily from a southeastern US perspective there are comments about west coast differences. Most of the hardiness zones/temperatures seem well stated; not too conservative as to limit possibilities and not too unrealistic as to set people up for disappointment. pH and other soil requirements are indicated. Plenty of comments about special conditions or hazards for determining placement in the landscape. A few lists of palms grouped by characteristics and a summary of palm diseases and problems are in the back. Well worth the money. Plus the snow covered Trachys on the covers really help sell the concept.

Axel, the library at Strybing might have a copy you can look over. Initially, I thought it looked a little thin by the cover but it is really dense with info.

The Riffle/Craft book is the "bible" but if I had to pick out only one book for a public library to promote hardy palms it would be this one.

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ghar41

Hi everyone,

Monkey ranch, nice synopsis in my opinion. It could easily be picked apart, not perfect but If there is a better cold hardy book please share.

I have a copy of the first edition from 2005. I've referred to it a number of times- the nutritional deficiency and flower specs info for example. Axel, Parajubaea is included pgs. 68-69.

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Kathryn

That was my first palm book and was very helpful since PalmTalk wasn't around and the internet was in its infancy.

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