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trioderob

proper placement of palms in a home landscape.....................

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doranakandawatta

Many thanks Kim,

You are very lucky in USA since you can visit so many wonderful gardens, and meet each other (I mean in Florida, or in California, or ... any palm friendly State).

Nobody comes to have tea with us in Doranakanda, gladly we have Palmtalk!

I go and read your thread about Ralph Velez's garden and Christopher Alexander (Axel helped me to discover).

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_Keith

Many thanks Kim,

You are very lucky in USA since you can visit so many wonderful gardens, and meet each other (I mean in Florida, or in California, or ... any palm friendly State).

Nobody comes to have tea with us in Doranakanda, gladly we have Palmtalk!

I go and read your thread about Ralph Velez's garden and Christopher Alexander (Axel helped me to discover).

Philippe, when it comes to palm interested visitors, it is pretty much the same here in Louisiana, . Last year was a record with two. I do have a few more visitors who are interested in the garden in general but I can tell they see 4 kinds of palms, big pinnate, small pinnate, big palmate, small palmate. :winkie:

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doranakandawatta

Many thanks Kim,

You are very lucky in USA since you can visit so many wonderful gardens, and meet each other (I mean in Florida, or in California, or ... any palm friendly State).

Nobody comes to have tea with us in Doranakanda, gladly we have Palmtalk!

I go and read your thread about Ralph Velez's garden and Christopher Alexander (Axel helped me to discover).

Philippe, when it comes to palm interested visitors, it is pretty much the same here in Louisiana, . Last year was a record with two. I do have a few more visitors who are interested in the garden in general but I can tell they see 4 kinds of palms, big pinnate, small pinnate, big palmate, small palmate. :winkie:

Keith,

Some others will notice your roses (white banks) , others will check if you block the access to your front-door....

Always nice to have visits, and if your visitors can tell: pinnate, small pinnate, big palmate, small palmate... at least they are not so bad.

Few years ago in Sri Lanka, I could tell: coconut tree, or not-coconut tree ! :)

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_Keith

Many thanks Kim,

You are very lucky in USA since you can visit so many wonderful gardens, and meet each other (I mean in Florida, or in California, or ... any palm friendly State).

Nobody comes to have tea with us in Doranakanda, gladly we have Palmtalk!

I go and read your thread about Ralph Velez's garden and Christopher Alexander (Axel helped me to discover).

Philippe, when it comes to palm interested visitors, it is pretty much the same here in Louisiana, . Last year was a record with two. I do have a few more visitors who are interested in the garden in general but I can tell they see 4 kinds of palms, big pinnate, small pinnate, big palmate, small palmate. :winkie:

Keith,

Some others will notice your roses (white banks) , others will check if you block the access to your front-door....

Always nice to have visits, and if your visitors can tell: pinnate, small pinnate, big palmate, small palmate... at least they are not so bad.

Few years ago in Sri Lanka, I could tell: coconut tree, or not-coconut tree ! :)

I did appreciate you noticing that, Philippe. And access to my door is blocked from the road. You must take a winding drive to get there, which I have tried to make inviting rather than oppressive. I wanted to draw one in by curiosity in an continuously unfolding landscape, each turn revealing something different and little more unique, ending in a warm feeling front porch that said "come sit here."

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akamu

Kim thanks for posting the ralph valez pics for philippe

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Darold Petty

Rob, you were asked in post # 6 to show us the front of your house. Let's have it ! :)

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trioderob

everyone said the tips I outlined in the thread were crap - so I am reading and learning from you guys.

is EVERYONE on this thread going to post a photo of the front of their house so we can talk about what worked and what did not ?

Edited by trioderob

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doranakandawatta

Rob, your were asked in post # 6 to show us the front of your house. Let's have it ! :)

Rob,

Since I have now been able to see Ralph's jungle, I really look forward to see pics of your garden.

I must say that - being european knowing only a little of Sri Lanka, and remembering a trip I did in California long time ago (1989) - all pictures of californian houses and gardens are very exotic and interesting for me, so different (like dutch gardens compared to french gardens).

For example I LOVE Topher Delaney's work....

With palms it's even more interesting for me and surely many others on Palmtalk.

Thank you for showing few pics!

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trioderob

Philippe-

my collection is very small compared to many on the forum here.

but i will tell you that before I started planting i did some research and found the information here and used it as a guide.

i believe that this guide works quite well- it frames the home in a nice way and adds value to the home.

its my guess that turning your home into a wild jungle does the opposite and detracts from its value,

as you have to convince the next perspective buyer why they should deal with the grief of caring for it all.

you also have the issue of water - a wild jungle gives the impression:

"honey I love the home but how much water $$$ is THAT going to cost us ????? "

Edited by trioderob

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doranakandawatta

Rob,

Palmtalk being a worldwide forum, we meet on the forum but we come from very different countries, culture and inspiration;

As the tropical garden is a dream for me but not my natural environment, I don't know what can be right,

I know only what I like, because of G. Bawa, M. Wijaya, Burle Marx, R. Jungle...(http://www.raymondjungles.com) ... Bali or Hawaii....

But american gardens we can see on TV (like in Desperate housewives) are nice too! difficult to find rules fitting to all!

Also, don't you think that with palms we are all lost, they grow and change so fast!

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Brahea Axel

Philippe-

my collection is very small compared to many on the forum here.

but i will tell you that before I started planting i did some research and found the information here and used it as a guide.

i believe that this guide works quite well- it frames the home in a nice way and adds value to the home.

its my guess that turning your home into a wild jungle does the opposite and detracts from its value,

as you have to convince the next perspective buyer why they should deal with the grief of caring for it all.

you also have the issue of water - a wild jungle gives the impression:

"honey I love the home but how much water $$$ is THAT going to cost us ????? "

The mind set that dictates that you must keep your home in such a way that you maximize the resale value is what creates the sea of bland suburbia. If you want to provide a home that has high resell value, don't plant anything of significant botanical value, because no one else will see the value. Put in a lawn and a few shrubs and you are done.

Our cities and towns would be so much more interesting if people stopped to operate according to the "how do I maximize house resell value" motto. In our town, you will see a lot of people who rip out their lawns and put veggie gardens in their place. Do they care about the resale value? Nope.

If you are a collector or an amateur botanist or horticulturalist, or you're into ethnobotany, whatever it is, set yourself free from the shackles of society and express yourself. You can always rip it all out and put the lawn back when it comes to selling your house. There will be plenty of IPS members who will line up at the door to volunteer to dig your palms and give them a new home.

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trioderob

Dude-

here is a Burle Marx property

notice how he worked the diagonal corners

neutra-house.jpg

just google "tropical landscaping"

to see how the pros do it - they all work the corners

tropical-landscape-ideas-2.jpg

Edited by trioderob

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robsp2000

Philippe-

my collection is very small compared to many on the forum here.

but i will tell you that before I started planting i did some research and found the information here and used it as a guide.

i believe that this guide works quite well- it frames the home in a nice way and adds value to the home.

its my guess that turning your home into a wild jungle does the opposite and detracts from its value,

as you have to convince the next perspective buyer why they should deal with the grief of caring for it all.

you also have the issue of water - a wild jungle gives the impression:

"honey I love the home but how much water $$$ is THAT going to cost us ????? "

The mind set that dictates that you must keep your home in such a way that you maximize the resale value is what creates the sea of bland suburbia. If you want to provide a home that has high resell value, don't plant anything of significant botanical value, because no one else will see the value. Put in a lawn and a few shrubs and you are done.

Our cities and towns would be so much more interesting if people stopped to operate according to the "how do I maximize house resell value" motto. In our town, you will see a lot of people who rip out their lawns and put veggie gardens in their place. Do they care about the resale value? Nope.

If you are a collector or an amateur botanist or horticulturalist, or you're into ethnobotany, whatever it is, set yourself free from the shackles of society and express yourself. You can always rip it all out and put the lawn back when it comes to selling your house. There will be plenty of IPS members who will line up at the door to volunteer to dig your palms and give them a new home.

I agree, if you follow that mindset, then you might as well paint every room a neutral color and have it staged as if you are always ready to sell it. To me, that is no way to live. Landscaping is like art and I do not think it can be defined or measured easily, what one person likes the next won't. The most important part is if you like it.

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trioderob

ok

i am wrong - lets turn this around and do the reverse of my recommendation

don't use the diagonal corners and plant directly in front of the house - it looks better that way

WWD_House.jpg

Edited by trioderob

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doranakandawatta

Landscaping is like "cooking" (in cuisine -art meaning) or like directing orchestra.

Would you agree with the comparison I do because landscape (huge scale) or garden (small scale) is always changing, and a garden and planting composition is a unique event you, as a cook with ingredients, compose following inspiration.

(Sorry but I really feel like a cook in my landscape design office!)

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Grasswing

rodney_dangerfield.jpg

Man, don't you think that this is too much?

He is giving only friendly advice...

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trioderob

just joking-

people can be "ultra negative" no matter what you post.

his advise is good.- i looked thru the the jungle landscape co he listed.

and burl marx was the best.

nice stuff.

Edited by trioderob

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doranakandawatta

Rob,

I hope you're not getting angry.

Palmtalk is the "camaraderie" place where we can meet, (I think Ken Johnson started a thread with "camaraderie") and we friendly share experiences and likes-or dislikes, and this forum don't become a ring.

As I wrote, your american front-gardens are typically american... I may like "palm fronds curtains".

Kindest regards

Philippe

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Kim

Rob, if you were really planning to sell your home soon, you wouldn't be planting palms at all, right? You'd save your money and energy for the next home. But you live there now, and you are planting palms, so you must have a longer time horizon in mind?

I commend you for trying to learn more about landscaping. Even those very general and unimaginative "rules" stimulate thought about the landscape as a broader concept, beyond the simple question of where to dig the next planting hole. The subject has stimulated an interesting discussion here, and when we visit the links to Wijaya, Bawa, Burle Marx (my fave), Ralph Velez, and others, it sparks the creative side of the brain. Though most of us do not have the equivalent of Fallingwater to work with, we can come away with ideas adaptable to our smaller scale gardens.

One of the main reasons to join and attend the local Palm Society meetings is the entrée to private gardens. And they are all PALM gardens! Wow! All so very different, from scorching desert to grassy golf course; from hillside splendor to coastal postage stamp, each has its own style and solutions.

I like the analogy to cooking -- that's a good mental image. I think of painting with plants, mixing the colors and textures -- bold strokes of broad leaves here, some delicate color there, a boulder as a focal point and a heat sink, a mysterious, leafy green path leading into the shadows, the sculptural punch of an aloe or a cycad, the tall palms framing the scene... You get the idea. :) There is a tree obscuring my San Diego front porch, providing some slight filtering shade on the hot west face of the house -- but I did not plant it!

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doranakandawatta

post-6735-0-62586900-1379964576_thumb.pn

form Raymond Jungles website.

Palms are welcoming you at the entrance. I like that!

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LilikoiLee

Home landscape design rules for palm nuts are:

1. Plant palms

2. There are no other rules.

Husband MIke and I got a big laugh out of your comment! Describes our garden perfectly! Lee

  • Upvote 1

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Jastin

Dude-

here is a Burle Marx property

notice how he worked the diagonal corners

neutra-house.jpg

just google "tropical landscaping"

to see how the pros do it - they all work the corners

tropical-landscape-ideas-2.jpg

The first picture is ugly.

The second picture is better because there is a pool and the Cocos frame the house BUT it looks to sterile. Where is the color? The plants are very bland in texture and variety. Not to mention the Phoenix with the spikes right by the pool, and the Cocos always needing to be trimmed of fruit. Also, as I was taught in landscape design class, palms are a bad choice for landscapes for two reasons. One: they cant be trimmed to height so they will eventually make your house look smaller and two: they don't provide consistent shade.

I totally agree there needs to be a design and you cant go overboard (if you want to sell) but I know that everyone that comes over to my house loves it and i have many palms in my small front yard. There is not one guideline to go by. If we all followed what Rob is saying every landscaped house would look pretty much the same.

and if i ever did sell my house I might be attracting a smaller market but i know my house would be sold to someone that would hopefully keep it up and enjoy it

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trioderob

error.

Edited by trioderob

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paulgila

error.

You edited that one at least twice.

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DoomsDave

I planted queen palms at my first California house.

Back in 1986. Sold the house in '89 after a bunch of escrows. The palms are still there.

Here's a link that shows it. 25859 Seventh Street, San Bernardino, CA, USA.

https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF-8&layer=c&z=17&iwloc=A&sll=34.112381,-117.240208&cbp=13,182.3,0,0,0&cbll=34.112660,-117.240194&q=25859+seventh+street+san+bernardino,+ca&ei=iCJBUpeUIqjfiALQy4CACg&ved=0CC8QxB0wAA

I didn't put in that ghetto-looking concrete. When I lived there, it had a green lawn, and lots of plants, and a drip system. Which cost a fortune, which the buyers ripped out. :( Along with the CIDPs I planted in the back yard.

Yeah yeah, their house . . . .

But, I love the curbs and gutters! Maw! Does that mean we'll have ta' wear shews' all the time?

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DoomsDave

The link shows a house I rented, after I moved from the San Bernardino house.

This is 3346 Grampion, Riverside, CA. Right down the road from the University of California, where I was a student. Nice, 5-bedroom house, quiet 'hood, no hoods.

https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF-8&layer=c&z=17&iwloc=A&sll=33.982214,-117.315145&cbp=13,84.2,0,0,0&cbll=33.982190,-117.315424&q=3346+grampion,+riverside&ei=5CRBUurxEMagigKd2oC4BA&ved=0CC8QxB0wAA

Those queen palms were all bitty little babies when planted, from 1-gallons back in 1990, more or less.

This is where i was living when they had that bad earthquake in 1991(?) which shook up Landers, CA and Big Bear (with your clothes on). The Mulberry Tree of Doom is gone, along with the Fracturing Fraxinus in the front. Plumbagos I planted are still there.

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Brahea Axel

error.

I went and asked Cleverbot if you were right, he says you're wrong.

ScreenShot2013-09-23at110210PM_zps48f5f0

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trioderob

The link shows a house I rented, after I moved from the San Bernardino house.

This is 3346 Grampion, Riverside, CA. Right down the road from the University of California, where I was a student. Nice, 5-bedroom house, quiet 'hood, no hoods.

https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&ie=UTF-8&layer=c&z=17&iwloc=A&sll=33.982214,-117.315145&cbp=13,84.2,0,0,0&cbll=33.982190,-117.315424&q=3346+grampion,+riverside&ei=5CRBUurxEMagigKd2oC4BA&ved=0CC8QxB0wAA

Those queen palms were all bitty little babies when planted, from 1-gallons back in 1990, more or less.

This is where i was living when they had that bad earthquake in 1991(?) which shook up Landers, CA and Big Bear (with your clothes on). The Mulberry Tree of Doom is gone, along with the Fracturing Fraxinus in the front. Plumbagos I planted are still there.

perfect example:

to me it would look better WITHOUT the middle 3 palms that block the center of the house.

much shorter plants should have been placed directly in front of the house

again this is not a math formula - there is no right or wrong.

BUT FOR GODS SAKES -DONT BLOCK THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE WITH A FEW RANDOM PALMS

landscaping+3.jpg

:interesting:

Edited by trioderob

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LJG

Still waiting on the pic of your front of house. Leadership by example.

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doranakandawatta

Is all this thread an error?

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doranakandawatta

Still waiting on the pic of your front of house. Leadership by example.

I agree but I think there is no hope on this thread, and since many posts, no palm- talk... only talk, talk, talk.... :asleep: and no palm anymore! :badday:

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LJG

Still waiting on the pic of your front of house. Leadership by example.

I agree but I think there is no hope on this thread, and since many posts, no palm- talk... only talk, talk, talk.... :asleep: and no palm anymore! :badday:

I posted my bad example front yard in this thread :)

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doranakandawatta

Palmatlk is IPS forum, at least we should have some palm-addict happiness, no palm-allergic or any real estate obsessed.

Many thanks to all who posted info about Wijaya, Ralph Velez or Burle Marx, in the middle of so many posts, we can get some information!

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pogobob

I think Trioderob and Axel are one and the same dude

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doranakandawatta

Still waiting on the pic of your front of house. Leadership by example.

I agree but I think there is no hope on this thread, and since many posts, no palm- talk... only talk, talk, talk.... :asleep: and no palm anymore! :badday:

I posted my bad example front yard in this thread :)

who said it's a bad example? it seems to be quite a young planting, let's see in 5 years ! :)

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Jastin

Palmatlk is IPS forum, at least we should have some palm-addict happiness, no palm-allergic or any real estate obsessed.

Many thanks to all who posted info about Wijaya, Ralph Velez or Burle Marx, in the middle of so many posts, we can get some information!

Actually,

DISCUSSING PALM TREES WORLDWIDE

Identification, Cultivation, Landscaping, General Interest, START HERE

  • Upvote 1

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