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Rhopalostylis Sapida Cold Tolerance/Hardiness - Any info appreciated!

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palmsnbananas

So I've been scouring this site trying to find some mention of R. Sapida's, or the genus in general's, cold tolerance.

Does anyone have any reports of this palm even having any damage in the cold and at what temperature?

What is the lowest temperature anyone with this palm has seen?

Also does anyone have info on cold hardiness of the different forms?

I'm sure between the members on this board we could get a great idea of how much it can handle, any info is appreciated!

If it is true that this palm can take sub 24 deg and survive then I am about to plant a triple!

I was thinking of the R. Sapida Oceana - (im not even sure what that means? is that the one with white petioles? is that chatham island?)

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TheMadScientist

In April 2013, I questioned a seed supplier in southern New Zealand concerning this species. They assured me their seeds were picked on March 29th. Being concerned about shelf life from seed distributors in Europe, I chose to go direct to these guys where habitat was. I questioned the 24 deg. F limit as I had 27 deg. F this last winter.....NO PROBLEM. I was looking forward to having these germinate 45 miles north of Los Angeles and 45 miles inland from the ocean. They arrived and upon opening the zip lock bag, moths flew out....so depressed. 4 months later, I tossed them out as nothing sprouted. I am hoping to get my next seeds from one of the members here in California. Please keep us up on your project.....I love the look of this species and a triple would be my ultimate. Scott

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Tassie_Troy1971

Hello

I Grow a few different forms of Rhopalostylis in my garden near Hobart Tasmania at 42 deg lattitude including Rhopalostylis sapida oceana = Chatham islands and Rhopalostylis from Auckland area and a few others including baueri and baueri cheesmanii . Our winters down here and the climate in general is alot colder than Houston which is humid subtropical i imagine some thing like South east Queensland .

All mine thrive in relitively open exposed positions and the Chatham islands ( oceana to some ) is the fastest grower making 3 full fronds a year and grows well right through our cold winters 50 - 60 F average highs .Summer temps are between 65 F - 75 F usually . My record low here at Old beach is 30 F .

chatham.jpg








































































































































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tank

Houston will see Low 20(F)s occasionally and the mid teens rarely. Very similar climate to N. Florida and will see short duration freezes into the mid 20s fairly regularly. My in-laws live in Houston and I remember walking to get breakfast one winter morning a couple years ago from their house and I think the temperature was a brisk 26F.

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tank

I seriously doubt that any rhopalostylis would survive a typical Houston winter. Plus, I would think this genus would struggle in the oppressively hot summers.

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palmsnbananas

I wish my record low was 30F, it gets down to about 28 every year! Thanks for the information Troy!

To Jason, yes I think Gainesville and Houston are probably exactly the same temperature wise w/ Houston being a few degrees warmer in the winter, that is what I wanted to know, if people like us could grow this as a borderline palm. If it can survive 24 deg I think that would make it doable with protection once in a while or in the right microclimate. Also I figured that our humidity could protect it from the kind of heat it receives in SoCal though it might not grow as fast b/c it is used to a more temperate environment. It might be possible!

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Xerarch

Sorry I can't comment on cold hardiness but I would like to echo what has been said about heat, this palm does not like prolonged hot and humid weather like so many other species that can handle some cold (i.e. Jubaea, Parajubaea, D. Decipiens, Ceroxylon) but won't tolerate the heat. Whether you get severe cold in Houston in any given winter is a toss up, but you are guaranteed to get prolonged sticky, humid heat every year. You will notice that Rhopalostylis is not found in Florida, not with much or long term success anyway (if anyone has information to contrary please post). In this country, this is a California only species (maybe Hawaii?) even though is does occasionally get hot in southern coastal California, it never gets the kind of prolonged heat and humidity that Houston does.

All that being said though, please go ahead and try, and keep us all apprised, I'm always in favor of experiments. I just wanted you to have the information so that you can make as informed a decision as possible.

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edbrown_III

I had about a dozen of them growing in the 90s ---- in my rain forest under canaopy. 1999 or there abouts we had this long period of 20 nights --- it never got below 20 but freezes every niight for a fortnight --- that was the year I gave up on them I lost all but one --- I also gave up on the Parajubea also --- I had one also and 3 Ceroxylon alpinums up to character leaves.

the experience pushed me to be interested in hybrids for Parajubea etc.

Best regards


Ed

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Tassie_Troy1971

Yeah i guess this species does not appreciate the hot humid nights over there !

My Summer nights are hardly ever over 60 F

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Alberto

I have some growing here for a few years now. R.sapida from Akaroa (slow growing) and R. Chatham that grows a lot faster .This winter it saw -3ºC this and also somewhat colder two years ago. Below canopy the Chatham shew some minor burnings on the tips of some fronds

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palmsnbananas

Hmm thanks for the info guys, I know they don't like humidity but I'll probably try anyways (in fact ill plant them next to a lake.. how do you like that).

Yeah I was fortunate that when I started palming we had some severe cold fronts in houston so I instantly found exactly what could grow here and what couldn't, most of the palms I have are pretty care free winter-wise. There's a few spots though where I'd like to experiment and try to zone push. I am growing some PTVT's and mules but was looking for something more exciting!

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palmsnbananas

I had about a dozen of them growing in the 90s ---- in my rain forest under canaopy. 1999 or there abouts we had this long period of 20 nights --- it never got below 20 but freezes every niight for a fortnight --- that was the year I gave up on them I lost all but one --- I also gave up on the Parajubea also --- I had one also and 3 Ceroxylon alpinums up to character leaves.

the experience pushed me to be interested in hybrids for Parajubea etc.

Best regards

Ed

Thanks Ed, this is very encouraging as I consider panhandle FL equivalent to where I live, and I'll try to figure out some way to protect them with lights or something.

I have some growing here for a few years now. R.sapida from Akaroa (slow growing) and R. Chatham that grows a lot faster .This winter it saw -3ºC this and also somewhat colder two years ago. Below canopy the Chatham shew some minor burnings on the tips of some fronds

Also encouraging!

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palmsnbananas

Found this on another forum - a fellow palmophile growing R. Oceana/Chatham Isles in a pot in England:

This doesn't seem to handle frost well. and was -5.6C that defoliated it, and it was under a canopy of Eucalyptus.

...reached about 6 feet, but was completely defoliated in the 2008/9 winter. It has recovered, but took 3 years, and is now back to about 4 ft tall.

(btw he was talking to you TassieTroy!)

So at least I now know 22F = complete defoliation/barely survivable (in potted plant)

That's somewhat encouraging.

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DoomsDave

Ah

Palms and Bananas!

Rhopie sapidas will not take heat above 90 F for long, and not in high humidity.

Forget about it.

Alas!

Even here in my Death Camp, where it hardly ever gets that hot they stress. THey're beach palms for NZ, Northern California, SOuthern California, etc.

Sorry, hate to see pain, if you wanna prove me wrong go ahead, but keep your receipt and prepare to sue 'em if you have to.

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palmsnbananas

Lalalala I can't hear you (thanks for the advice)

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Brahea Axel

Rhopies are by far my best growing palms, growing like weeds as if they belong here. That's probably because my Summertime overnight lows are 44-58F. Like Troy my lows rarely make it over 60F. Rhopies just do not like warm nights and high dew points are a deal killer. You might be able to get them to survive, but if you combine that with cold spells that drop much below 26F, they're going to be very, very unhappy. Under canopy they can take lower than that without damage.

As far as the absolute kill temperature is concerned, I know of at least one r. sapida growing in a frost hollow in Santa Cruz where it survived the 1990 freeze at 19F when it was frozen to the ground when it still didn't have a trunk but it regrew from that most likely because the heart of the palm was still below ground. It got 80% frond damage in 1998 at extended (>12 hours multi-night freezes) at 24F, at which time it had no trunk but had an already emerging crownshaft, but it grew right out of it. Today it's blooming. In this frost hollow where it grows, it sees temps in the 25-27F for short durations every Winter from which it just gets leaf tip burn at the very top. Apparently the super vertical orientation of the fronds greatly minimize frost exposure. It is able to handle cold because of the speed at which it grows during the Summer. It just loves the cool Summer nights, and judging from how they grow in San Francisco's foggiest neighborhoods, the peak metabolism range is probably 55-65F with a wider thriving range of 45F-75F.

I don't think there is any difference in actual tissue hardiness in the various rhopies. The ones with more horizontal leaf exposure (for example chatham islands) just get more frost damage than the super vertical shaving brush growing ones. But I have noticed growth speed differences. Oceana is a rocket, these things are probably the fastest of all the rhopies.

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palmsnbananas

Yeah I looked up the weather in Chatham Islands and its really amazing the kind of climate there... like hawaii except near antarctica, the weather varies very little but its always cool, and it rains alot. I'm sure they have evolved to have optimal metabolism at lower temperatures but oh well, in houston overnight lows dont get under 60 for a good 6-7 months!! The only plus is our constant winter rain will be no problem for them, snow might be a different story though.

Edited by palmsnbananas

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

post-116-0-55698900-1379101157_thumb.jpg

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Brahea Axel

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

attachicon.gifrhop.jpg

Jeff, your heat in Modesto is still "Mediterranean". There's a really big difference between hot Modesto and hot and humid Southeast. See http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca5738, your average Summer minimum is actually 60F even if you get some nights with lows higher than that. Your house is hot in the Summer and probably keeps temps slightly higher than the weather station location. (This is not the Airport.)

Rhopies actually do fine even in parts of Southern California where temps don't drop below 68F in the Summer, but it's still quite a bit drier there than in Houston. They'll take daytime heat if grown in shade.

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sonoranfans

Hmm thanks for the info guys, I know they don't like humidity but I'll probably try anyways (in fact ill plant them next to a lake.. how do you like that).

Yeah I was fortunate that when I started palming we had some severe cold fronts in houston so I instantly found exactly what could grow here and what couldn't, most of the palms I have are pretty care free winter-wise. There's a few spots though where I'd like to experiment and try to zone push. I am growing some PTVT's and mules but was looking for something more exciting!

I am not aware that PVT would survive a hot humid climate like Houston or florida. My understanding is that parajubaea sunkha has been successfully grown in florida, but PVT is a no. I could be wrong, I'm just working from memory...

Edited by sonoranfans

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palmsnbananas

Hmm thanks for the info guys, I know they don't like humidity but I'll probably try anyways (in fact ill plant them next to a lake.. how do you like that).

Yeah I was fortunate that when I started palming we had some severe cold fronts in houston so I instantly found exactly what could grow here and what couldn't, most of the palms I have are pretty care free winter-wise. There's a few spots though where I'd like to experiment and try to zone push. I am growing some PTVT's and mules but was looking for something more exciting!

I am not aware that PVT would survive a hot humid climate like Houston or florida. My understanding is that parajubaea sunkha has been successfully grown in florida, but PVT is a no. I could be wrong, I'm just working from memory...

Mine is doing fine, it may be growing slower than in california or it may not I have no idea??

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palmsnbananas

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

attachicon.gifrhop.jpg

Thanks for the great info even though I hate you now!

Sounds like it won't work here then but I'll try it anyways and see what happens, Decipiens may be the only option!

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Xerarch

D. Decipiens is another that does not like prolonged high heat and humidity. It may do better than Rhopalostylis though, I've seen nice pics of them in places like Hawaii but they won't thrive in Florida.

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palmsnbananas

I have a small decipiens and its survived the last two years, though it is not in its ideal climate.

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Xerarch

I have a small decipiens and its survived the last two years, though it is not in its ideal climate.

Good to hear, let's hope it lasts!

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

attachicon.gifrhop.jpg

Thanks for the great info even though I hate you now!

Sounds like it won't work here then but I'll try it anyways and see what happens, Decipiens may be the only option!

Sorry :violin:

But hey, Rhopies aren't very expensive. Buy one anyway. If it makes it a couple of years and looks nice... what are you out?

I know for a fact mine is on borrowed time.

Im pretty sure my Dippy will outlive me.

jeff

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palmsnbananas

Well just fyi, I have a torralyi double right now that I was going to replace with a R. oceana triple, but I think I'll keep the PTVTs as I've been looking at Gaston's habitat pictures and they are actually more beautiful than I thought (sour grapes). I can place the R. Oceana in a more protected spot in the front yard where a fast outgrowing L. Chinensis will probably be removed, It will survive better there and it'll be in a nice showcased location.

Thanks for all the help everyone, and people can keep adding to this so we have a detailed record of where this palm can grow!

Edited by palmsnbananas

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

attachicon.gifrhop.jpg

Jeff, your heat in Modesto is still "Mediterranean". There's a really big difference between hot Modesto and hot and humid Southeast. See http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca5738, your average Summer minimum is actually 60F even if you get some nights with lows higher than that. Your house is hot in the Summer and probably keeps temps slightly higher than the weather station location. (This is not the Airport.)

Rhopies actually do fine even in parts of Southern California where temps don't drop below 68F in the Summer, but it's still quite a bit drier there than in Houston. They'll take daytime heat if grown in shade.

I think we've discussed this once our twice before so it aint worth going over. :badday:

You can pretty much take your pick of weather stations around town... never get the same reading.

One even has our average summer high and lows 88/55f ... huh? Both those figures are low, in reality, this summer was a pretty average

July/August 2013. with an average of 95f and a low of 63f

This month so far, our average has been 93f/63f

Yes Mediterranean". But hotter than florida during the day, just nice cooler sleeping weather in the AM here. No summer rain!

We rarely see many 50's lows during the summer.

Theres a guy with a pimped up weather station about 2 blocks from me. He posts on weather underground.

Since his records temps almost same as I get with my cheapo, I trust his.

look it up.

Ok let me finish ready my paper! :interesting:

Jeff

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Tassie_Troy1971

If you already have the Oceana it would be well worth growing indoors or on a shady patio as they make nice plants even in a pot and could be grown this way for a long time .

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Brahea Axel

Ok, You've heard the rest... now you get to hear from the King of Climate stretchers!

:mrlooney:

I have grown 2 R. Sapida's here in my frost hollow.

First one was about 15 years ago before my side yard had a big Lychee tree canopy.

I planted a nice healthy ( Hawaii sized ) 5 gal R. Sapida.

It did ok the first summer, winter came, 25f, killed it dead. Even though it was in a protected spot between two houses.

Number two, I bought at the IPS meeting at Glenn's house a couple of years ago. It was a 1 gal I believe.

It has been nipped by temps as low as 26f. I think the first year it lost half its leaf surface to frost.

The last 2 years it has been looking nice ... but it is slowwww.

Maybe a little faster than my Dypsis Decipiens, but definitely more frost tender.

Contrary to what I've been told, the heat doesn't seem to bother it. And we see a lot of summer days above 100-108f and nights above 70f.

Lots of higher than normal dew points this summer as well.

I'd say give it a try, but don't expect it to survive out in the open below 25f or so.

If you want the look, without the frost tenderness, try a dypsis decipiens.

But below 20f, I think even this guy would be a gonner.

Here is my Rhopie today.

Jeff

attachicon.gifrhop.jpg

Jeff, your heat in Modesto is still "Mediterranean". There's a really big difference between hot Modesto and hot and humid Southeast. See http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca5738, your average Summer minimum is actually 60F even if you get some nights with lows higher than that. Your house is hot in the Summer and probably keeps temps slightly higher than the weather station location. (This is not the Airport.)

Rhopies actually do fine even in parts of Southern California where temps don't drop below 68F in the Summer, but it's still quite a bit drier there than in Houston. They'll take daytime heat if grown in shade.

I think we've discussed this once our twice before so it aint worth going over. :badday:

You can pretty much take your pick of weather stations around town... never get the same reading.

One even has our average summer high and lows 88/55f ... huh? Both those figures are low, in reality, this summer was a pretty average

July/August 2013. with an average of 95f and a low of 63f

This month so far, our average has been 93f/63f

Yes Mediterranean". But hotter than florida during the day, just nice cooler sleeping weather in the AM here. No summer rain!

We rarely see many 50's lows during the summer.

Theres a guy with a pimped up weather station about 2 blocks from me. He posts on weather underground.

Since his records temps almost same as I get with my cheapo, I trust his.

look it up.

Ok let me finish ready my paper! :interesting:

Jeff

Jeff, potato or potatoe, haggling over whether your low is 60F or 63F is totally besides the point, the lows aren't that relevant, you could even have an average low of 68F and it would still not matter, it's the humidity that matters. Go hang out in Miami and Houston in the middle of Summer one of these days, it will give you a new appreciation for how nice and dry Modesto is. As much as we'd all like to imagine our little neck of the woods is tropical, California is Mediterranean, and that's what the rhopies prefer.

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palmsnbananas

Just bought one from Joe at Discovery Island Palms he was great! I'll see how it does this winter in pot and decide what to do from there!

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Brahea Axel

Just bought one from Joe at Discovery Island Palms he was great! I'll see how it does this winter in pot and decide what to do from there!

I say go for it, I am trying my luck at some palms that prefer your kind of climate. That's part of the fun of pushing the edge. I do think oceana is probably your best bet because it's so vigorous to begin with, it's the most likely to survive conditions to which it might be less adapted to. Joe's oceanas are very nice and robust.

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Brahea Axel

Just bought one from Joe at Discovery Island Palms he was great! I'll see how it does this winter in pot and decide what to do from there!

I say go for it, I am trying my luck at some palms that prefer your kind of climate. That's part of the fun of pushing the edge. I do think oceana is probably your best bet because it's so vigorous to begin with, it's the most likely to survive conditions to which it might be less adapted to. Joe's oceanas are very nice and robust.

I think I need to take back that oceana suggestion. I just visited DoomsDave's garden today, he was suggesting that baueri is far more heat tolerant and the better choice for inland Southern California where it gets hot. he says he wouldn't even try sapida because it's too hot at his place. I really don't know enough about growing rhopies in a hot climate as mine is rather cool, so I should just shut up. :)

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palmsnbananas

I'll try the oceana and see what happens, I'll be able to tell the heat hardiness in the next year so not too much time wasted.

Edited by palmsnbananas

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sarasota alex

Qasim, as was mentioned you would have a far greater challenge getting a Rhopalostylis to survive Houston summers than winters. I am not saying that it can't be done, just you can be sure that you would need to worry more about the heat than the cold. Whatever you do, I would recommend deep shade.

I've visited the Mercer Arboretum in Houston 2 weeks ago for the first time in about 20 months and a few palms are gone. Among them - a mature Trithrinax acanthocoma. It did not even get damaged during the two nasty cold stretches (Jan 2010 and Feb 2011, including a freezing rain), so I would assume that it died from heat. Also a Butia odorata x Parajubaea cocoides hybrid is not in good shape following this summer. That palm has always been healthy there.

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palmsnbananas

Thanks for the info, my front yard has two oaks for shade so I'm picking a spot with definite canopy but it will still be in the 90s for a few months even in the shade.

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Phoenix Bob

Rophies (a.k.a. shaving-brush palms) are among my favorite species. I am so fond of them that upon arriving in Auckland on my first visit to N.Z. after a nearly 14 hour flight, i went directly from the airport to the Auckland Botanical Gardens just to see one in native habitat. What I did conclude from that first visit is that Rophies must be fairly sensitive to cold. They are incredibly prolific on the warmer, northern half of New Zealand's North Island, actually growing wild in huge forests..............a magnificent sight, fort sure! However, I don't recall seeing any on the lower half of the South Island which is significantly cooler.

I have also had the privilege of seeing Tassie Troy's Rophies in his palm garden in Old Beach (Hobart) Tasmania, Australia. which is waaaaay south (42 degrees below the equator), and they are fantastic. Troy obviously has a wonderful micro-climate considering the other tropicals he grows, and I would also have to say that he is a VERY talented "palmie." Because of the marine influence on Hobart's weather, its climate appears to be very similar to that of the Bay Area of California where I first observed (and fell in love with) Rophies.

My limited experience with Rophies tells me that Houston's prolonged and extreme summer heat and humidity coupled with its 20 degree cold snaps in the winter make up an environment so radically different from the North Island of N.Z., that the successful growth of shaving brush palms is highly doubtful......................too bad; they're tropical appearance makes them really special.

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palmsnbananas

Thanks for the info, its already been purchased!

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Xenon

Do you have any royal or foxtail palms? Much more likely to have several mild winters than a cold summer...

Edited by Xenon

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