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_Keith

Fall is near and Winter not far away - Prep thoughts?

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_Keith

It'll be fall before you know it, and right behind, what us cold hardy gardeners hate, winter.

Are you already thinking about preparations?

Physical protections, chemical protections?

What's on your mind to help your palms through the winter?

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Flow

I live in zone 7, I'm always prepared:-) No but anyway I only have truly coldhardy palms planted out that can take some frost for more than an hour or so without protection. I set up everything in late december.

Since I've only started growing palms last year I protect them heavily which means a thick layer of mulch, styrofoam houses and heating if necessary. I use light chains as heating cables (no led) so I can always see when they turn on. Last winter they didn't. They're set at -6C for my Jubaea and at -10 for my Trachys and Chamaerops. We did have -6C for sure but the styrofoam was enough (4cm thick).

Once they are well established I will begin to experiment and see what they can take.

Here's a picture of my jub which has grown four leaves so far which isn't bad because we had one of the longest winters ever:

post-6290-0-92280800-1377537928_thumb.jp

I guess those are things that you never have to think about..?

Best

Flo

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MattyB

I might have to close my front door in a couple of months.

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Palm crazy

Over the weekend I saw my first fuzzy caterpillar, never a good sign seeing one of them this early in the year.

Edited by Palm crazy

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Hammer

This may be my very last chance to say this for quite some time...6am and my overnight low and current temp is 70f. So nice.

All of my sensitive plants are still small enough to bring inside. So my kitchen will be repurposed as a greenhouse sometime in the next couple of months.

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sonoranfans

My palms are now established in the roots and there is a partial canopy in the "zone push area" of my yard that wasn't there in 2010 when the last cold winter hit. Some of my zone 10a palms can die in a cold winter, but many of my frost tender palms are not likely to see frost as they are now protected, naturally. There is a natural survival process ongoing, with zone 8-9 palms waiting in the containers to replace that which croaks... sabal domingensis, butia yatay, butia yatay x queen, butia yatay x jubaea, and (butia xJ)xJ are waiting in containers for their opportunity. But I will keep zone pushing as every year the canopy and wind break improves the outlook for zone pushes.

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tank

Stocking up on bourbon, scotch, tequila...

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edbrown_III

Power of positive drinking !

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_Keith

Stocking up on bourbon, scotch, tequila...

What, no Rum?

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LJG

Fingers crossed for Indian Summer.

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

You believe that crap? Take a read here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2013/08/26/the-farmers-almanac-outrageous-forecast-a-stormy-super-bowl-and-frigid-snowy-winter/

Last year's predictions were 100% wrong. It turned out the opposite of what they predicted. West Coast was supposed to be cool with near normal precipitation. Instead, we had widespread upper 70's and low 80's in both Jan and Feb and a total lack of rain.

I checked their forecast for the West Coast: cool and more rainy than usual, but not cold. But unfortunately they're extremely unreliable, you'll get more accurate predictions reading the trash at the supermarket checkout where you can also read about extra-terrestrial babies and other such nonsense.

Anyway, check out http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/lanina/enso_evolution-status-fcsts-web.pdf and you will see it favors neutral ENSO conditions with both positive and negative water temperature anomalies. The law of averages dictates that most likely we'll see more rainfall this year to make up for the lack of rainfall last year. That's always a good thing indicating less frost than usual.

If you don't like all the graphics, read the bulletin here: http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/analysis_monitoring/enso_advisory/ensodisc.html.

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tank

Not really worried about anything that I have planted out other than a couple things. I have a Livistona muellerii that I grew from seed that I planted out this spring from a 7 gal pot. Pretty much planted it against the house. Also, I seemed to have found a spot for a Parajubea sunkha (double) where it seems really happy. I'd like for it to not get tested quite yet. Will probably cover a couple plants if it comes to that.

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

You believe that crap?

Of course not, but it makes for awfully fun conversation.

It does! I confess that I actually read the almanac because it's fun reading, with the caveat that most of it is b.s.

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

Not really worried about anything that I have planted out other than a couple things. I have a Livistona muellerii that I grew from seed that I planted out this spring from a 7 gal pot. Pretty much planted it against the house. Also, I seemed to have found a spot for a Parajubea sunkha (double) where it seems really happy. I'd like for it to not get tested quite yet. Will probably cover a couple plants if it comes to that.

L. Mulleri is a cool looking livistona, I wish I could get my hands on one. Can you post some pics?

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Palm crazy

You know its getting close to fall when Goodwill has a sign that reads… ‘Check out are blankets for your tender plants’. Their prices weren’t that good, but I did get some really good blanket deals at a yard sale over the weekend. And, a few weeks ago I bought 100 watt infra red heat lamp to try out this winter.

If the fall rains hold off awhile, we still have 8 weeks left of dry weather before the rainy season officially starts.

Edited by Palm crazy

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

You know its getting close to fall when Goodwill has a sign that reads Check out are blankets for your tender plants. Their prices werent that good, but I did get some really good blanket deals at a yard sale over the weekend. And, a few weeks ago I bought 100 watt infra red heat lamp to try out this winter.

If the fall rains hold off awhile, we still have 8 weeks left of dry weather before the rainy season officially starts.

I had no idea the Pacific Northwest was drier than California, rainy season officially starts Oct 15 here. Can't wait for the first rains, yum!!! The smell of fresh rain and faster growing palms is something to be enjoyed.

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_Keith

October is our second driest month of the year, but come late November it may not truly be dry again till April. Of course this year, it never dried up at all. It just kept raining, and raining, and raining.

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Funkthulhu

Need to buy a roll of screen, some 1x2's and a couple hinges. I will have to complete my screened area of the basement before the over-night temps hit 40 degrees.

I don't want a repeat of the Great Cat Salad Bar incident I had last winter. . .

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Palm crazy

You know its getting close to fall when Goodwill has a sign that reads Check out are blankets for your tender plants. Their prices werent that good, but I did get some really good blanket deals at a yard sale over the weekend. And, a few weeks ago I bought 100 watt infra red heat lamp to try out this winter.

If the fall rains hold off awhile, we still have 8 weeks left of dry weather before the rainy season officially starts.

I had no idea the Pacific Northwest was drier than California, rainy season officially starts Oct 15 here. Can't wait for the first rains, yum!!! The smell of fresh rain and faster growing palms is something to be enjoyed.

We are getting some rain tonight and almost all day tomorrow before we go dry again, but it has been almost 2 months with no real rain. 80% chance tomorrow, Yahoo!

Sometime the rainy season does start here in mid October, (the beginning of the rainy season here is when it goes from semi dry to full wet every day.) with no sunlight, just one rain storm after the next…that is when you know its the rainy season here. :badday:

Mid September is when the moss starts to grow here from the morning dew and a few light rain showers at night.

Edited by Palm crazy

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Tropicdoc

Farmer's almanac says cold winter and hurricane center predicts active hurricane season. They predict an active season every year because its not so bad if they overcall it. If they say inactive and we get a bad one.... they have egg on their face. Tank, it will be interesting to see how the P. sunkha does in your climate. I was hoping to get some syagrus x P. sunkha from Tim Hopper, but I am still waiting for my shipment. As far as winter prep.... It's always zone 10b in my pop-up greehouses. B) Keith, you could still flip a home depot bucket over those B alfredii this winter probably...Maybe with a hot hands pouch laid on the spear for the coldest nights.

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tank

Here is my little muelleri. Its too close to the house, on purpose. Really not expecting it to survive long term, but thought I'd give it a chance.


post-526-0-10685200-1377874484_thumb.jpg

Also, here is a Acrocomia totai or something like that. In the ground for 3 years and survived lows into the mid teens(F). Defoliates every winter.

post-526-0-40741300-1377874665_thumb.jpg

My P. sunkha, next to the condenser with a Macrozamia moorei in front, under a large poinsettia that was there when we bought the house. Poinsettia dies back every winter. There is a Butia x Parajubaea in front of the condenser, but I neglected to take a pic of it.

post-526-0-05133000-1377875307_thumb.jpg

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tank

My little T. princeps, has never shown any damage over the three years its been in the ground.

post-526-0-90679800-1377875533_thumb.jpg

post-526-0-51008300-1377875568_thumb.jpg

One of my 4 Sabal uresanas that I have planted out, its about 5ft oa (planning on planting about 3 or 4 more). This one is in a very soggy part of the yard and has been the quickest grower. Pretty much wet feet for at least half the year.

post-526-0-80642300-1377875723_thumb.jpg

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Palm crazy

I made a little video for you Axel, the PNW (western side) summer drought is over…Things are really going to take off after this rain.

Click photo to see.

th_MOV00007_zpsf42e3c55.jpg

Edited by Palm crazy

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

Here is my little muelleri. Its too close to the house, on purpose. Really not expecting it to survive long term, but thought I'd give it a chance.

lmuelleri.JPG

Also, here is a Acrocomia totai or something like that. In the ground for 3 years and survived lows into the mid teens(F). Defoliates every winter.

atotai.JPG

My P. sunkha, next to the condenser with a Macrozamia moorei in front, under a large poinsettia that was there when we bought the house. Poinsettia dies back every winter. There is a Butia x Parajubaea in front of the condenser, but I neglected to take a pic of it.

psunk.JPG

That Mülleri is close to the house, which is why it will make it and then you'll have a problem, but it's a good problem, those are nice palms.

I have three t princeps that I found on E-bay, they grow like weeds when you lime them. They're supposed to be super hardy.

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Phoenikakias

This year I have outplanted a juvenile Jubaeopsis caffra and a Medemia argun, which I plan to protect through building of individual removable cold frames made of rabbit cage-wire and hard plastic. There is however a small technical problem, which is, how shelters remain stable by strong wind (which is rather the norm here). I think that stabilizing the shelters through wires with the help of 4 preinstalled poles might be the answer. This winter no palm dies !(hopefully)

post-6141-0-66046800-1377962703_thumb.jppost-6141-0-37836800-1377962730_thumb.jppost-6141-0-79584300-1377962756_thumb.jppost-6141-0-42703200-1377962782_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 1

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oppalm

I am in Kansas zone 6, my winter preparations are likely different than most people on this forum, I cover everything and add warmth with a 60watt bulb on a thermocube to 3 of my 6 inground palms.

My winter prediction is we'll all be about average with the exception of occasional temps below normal for a short period and higher than average temps for a few days for short periods. Winter precipitation will be about average with maybe one or two events that cause lots of rain or snow or ice (as the case may be). I'm going with that more or less.

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_Keith

After getting burned one too many times, I pretty much plant for my zone now, but I really appreciate the hard work some of your in the 8 and lower zones go through to have a palm or 2 in your yards.

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Silas_Sancona

Read the same predictions Axel referenced. Also saw that the CPC is calling for above normal temps for most of CA. this winter. With neutral conditions in the E. Pac., my own thoughts about this winter are a toss up. May not matter much since I may not be here to see what happens. Looking forward to enjoying a holiday rum and coke on Siesta Key, instead of slinging X-mas trees this year. -Nathan-

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Funkthulhu

Hmmm, parts of Wyoming to have 6-10 inches of snow today. . .

Overnight lows below 40 this weekend here (?)

Guess I better actually get those grow lights set up in the basement...

Or maybe I can squeak by with running the firepit on the deck that night! :floor:

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Palm crazy

Just hear the extended winter weather outlook for the PNW is more rain the first half of winter and cooler temps. Followed by a warmer second half of winter, with a cooler than normal spring in April and May…. that’s means summer will be good and fall will be warmer than this year. The reason why we’re having cooler fall is because we had a very warm dry first six months this year.

Edited by Palm crazy

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Funkthulhu

Got down to 37 this weekend, and drizzling rain the whole time. Dragged everything inside, even potted up a couple of the larger bananas. I swear some of those pots are tipping the scales over 150 lbs now.

I need an elevator...

gdmk.jpg

And more lights...

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_Keith

Do you bring them out during warm sunny periods?

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Funkthulhu

Do you bring them out during warm sunny periods?

I used to, back in the days of apartment balconies or single level living. Now that I have to haul them up and down a narrow, steep basement stairway it has become a once-a-year round trip. I'm going to invest this season in some higher intensity lighting for my winter area. I hope that will be enough to keep them all happy in the off-season.

As far as the biggest pots go (R.rivularis >7', Musa Basjoo >7') they're also the heaviest and most awkward to move. If I get growth next summer like this year it is likely that neither will be going back into the house next fall (2014). I already have arrangements to move the R.rivularis to the atrium of my workplace when it gets too tall for my ceilings. The banana will likely get trimmed, dug up and put in hibernation, or just cut off and buried under compost and mulch for the winter. So far as I have read, once a good mat of corms is established they will grow like weeds every spring.

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_Keith

Those lighting purchases and electric bill will get you on the Cannabis watch list, lol.

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Tropicdoc

just ordered another 8 x 10 spring gardener gable greenhouse these work great until plants are too tall

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Hammer

LEDs will save you Funky. Check 'em out if you haven't already.

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