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trioderob

transplanting a large adult fruiting coconut palm to California ?

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trioderob

so everyone knows they do not make it past winter - they always die- except for a few stunted examples. The Newport palm being the most famous - yadeee yadee yadeee.

ok -

now looking on line - I see NOTHING about anyone doing a transplant of a large already fruiting palm

to southern California. if anyone has first hand info (not just speculation or guess work) or can show me anything on line where this has been attempted and failed I will climb under a rock.

growing one up to coconuts - no

already have them and it lives - ???

Edited by trioderob

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Kim

It would probably be cheaper to buy land in Hawaii. Not only that, but a lot in Hawaii will retain its value longer than a mature coconut jerked out of the tropics and transplanted to California, if you know what I mean... That's my simple cost/benefit analysis; no charge. :winkie:

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trioderob

anytime you try something hard there will always be naysayers

anyone ever try it ?

know anyone who did ?

ever read a first hand account or a report of someone who tried it ?

if not - then you are guessing

Edited by trioderob

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Kim

Go for it! :)

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trioderob

i would like to get the San Diego Zoo to front the bill.

maybe I am 100% wrong and it will die over the first winter.

All i am asking is WHERE is the report that they wont transplant ?

people have brought coconuts back for years and planted them and they died over winter.

They were seedlings - not adult palms.

can anyone find even a single old photo of a large ADULT coco on the back of a semi coming in to Los Angeles or San Diego ?

Edited by trioderob

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MattyB

I assume you'd have to address the soil importing issue. Don't imported plants to CA have to be certified that they are grown on benches in a media that's not "dirt"? How do you field grow a coconut on a bench in not dirt?

But don't they bring in huge field grown Washies? How do they do that? Maybe my point is not valid.

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Zeeth

The winter we had a few years ago made it evident to me that size and age in a coconut palm only make it more tolerant to absolute minimum temperature, but not long cool weather.

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DoomsDave

You can always import things, if you're willing to take the time, pay the fees, and pay for whatever the paranoids overseeing the importation want. I say paranoids, with all respect, because California probably grows for money, just about every crop that can be grown for money, except truly tropical stuff, like coconuts, pineapples, etc. All of these money crops have lobbyists who lobby to place barriers to importation, and, also, to prevent pests.

In the nursery biz, there are certificates you can get, for example, saying that you're free of, among others, the European Brown Snail, nematodes, trematodes, cane toads, fire ants, saggy pants, or whatever other bug, germ, fungus or whatever is on the ag-powers' [feces] list(s) du jour. These certificates are gotten by having someone inspect (for a price) and, usually certify that a bug or other killer was applied by a person licensed to do so (for a price) etc., etc. If you don't have something like that, there's a more expensive protocol to be followed, often a quarantine. (Which no one wants.)

That's how Home Depot and others get plants into Cali en masse from Florida or elsewhere. The nursery selling them (usually) arranges for the necessary permits. They usually have staff conversant in that type of thing who can help, too.

That might be cheaper than buying a lot in Hawaii.

But, maybe not . . .

And, do you want to be the guy who brought Lethal Yellow to California?

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trioderob

could bring it in from extreme southern Texas on a flat bed - no ?

that would cut the trip in half and i don't think they get all the nasty bugs like Florida has.

cheaper than Hawaii even

not saying this is easy or cheap - just may be the ONLY way to ever do it -if it can be done.

Edited by trioderob

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Brahea Axel

could bring it in from extreme southern Texas on a flat bed - no ?

that would cut the trip in half and i don't think they get all the nasty bugs like Florida has.

cheaper than Hawaii even

not saying this is easy or cheap - just may be the ONLY way to ever do it -if it can be done.

A large coconut brought into the right microclimate in Socal has an excellent chance of making it. That's my own humble opinion drawn from Norcal grower success with larger specimens where smaller ones have failed.

Cost wise best to import via cargo and get the right certificates. Doing it via truck is more expensive unless you can piggy back on a large palm shipment going westward from Florida. That's why Hawaii is cheaper, especially given that cargo ships head back to the mainland with less cargo.

I would recommend only USDA zones 11a similar to Newport Beach. So sunset zone 24, otherwise you're flushing cash down the toilet.

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trioderob

so again-

has nursery man like RSN brought in a large vibrant fruiting coco and tried to plant it in an ideal micro in southern cal ?

or for the naysayers - in the old times did a large venue or organization try it - it failed after several expert attempts - and they documented this a horticultural type publication ???

Edited by trioderob

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bgl

Even if a large coconut were to survive long term in SoCal, one thing is a given - it's not going to look remotely as good as it would in a suitable climate. So, what's the point in spending lots of money by bringing in a large tree (if this is even possible) when there are so many other palms that will actually thrive and look great in SoCal? Makes no sense. A Howea (for instance) may not be all that exotic in SoCal but a group of Howeas will give that tropical look, AND chances are they will be lightyears ahead of the Cocos when it comes to being visually pleasing.

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trioderob

but it ain't a coco

those palms you can have every day of the week

..................an adult coconut you cant.

Edited by trioderob

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Kim

I've got one I'll sell you. Come and get it. :)

Edit: Cash up front. No refunds. :mrlooney:

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trioderob

whats your price delivered ?

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Kim

Sorry, no delivery included. You dig & haul, and don't mess up my Kerriodoxas in the process.

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Will

I support the outrageous.

It takes a pioneer to show the naysayers what is possible...or not...

The only way to answer your question is to give it a try, and then you'll know.

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LJG

Rob, why not put your money where your mouth is so to speak? Be a leader not a follower. How about less "why" and more "Do?

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trioderob

LEN-

I knew it was you as soon as i read the post ............

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bgl

but it ain't a coco

those palms you can have every day of the week

..................an adult coconut you cant.

True! So the goal is to spend lots of money in order to have a crappy looking palm rather than have beautiful palms for much less money? Just trying to grasp the basic concept.... :mrlooney:

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spockvr6

Sorry, no delivery included. You dig & haul, and don't mess up my Kerriodoxas in the process.

If the deal with Kim doesnt work out as youd rather avoid travel by sea, I have 9 of them in my yard of various sizes (some nice Maypans!) which you can come to FL and dig out your choice of them. Its 6000 miles round trip, but youll avoid the aforementioned sea vessel.

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spockvr6

Even if a large coconut were to survive long term in SoCal, one thing is a given - it's not going to look remotely as good as it would in a suitable climate. So, what's the point in spending lots of money by bringing in a large tree (if this is even possible) when there are so many other palms that will actually thrive and look great in SoCal? Makes no sense. A Howea (for instance) may not be all that exotic in SoCal but a group of Howeas will give that tropical look, AND chances are they will be lightyears ahead of the Cocos when it comes to being visually pleasing.

The most exotic palm in my neighborhood here in Palm Harbor is a Howea! These are just not seen around here at all (I understand they are just not well suited and I cant say Ive seen another one anywhere), but this one looks perfect.

Edited by spockvr6

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US_Marine

I think its a worth a shot trying.

If its too expensive to have one shipped why not plant one in a very large container and it put it in a a huge green house during winter? I'm sure someone in SoCal has a big enough green house? Although it would take some time to reach maturity it would be by far the cheapest and easiest way. Even bringing it indoors for several years would probably increase your chances.

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trioderob

I am going to see if the zoo would give it a try.

would be a great showpiece for them as the plants at the zoo are more valuable than the animals and they know it.

i am hoping someone has PROOF it wont work and stops me.

for example: lets say that some major nurseryman brought in 5 coco's -full grown- to try it and all died the first winter. Some kind of solid evidence............... :bemused:

Edited by trioderob

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Dypsisdean

"If the mountain won't come to Muhammad then Muhammad must go to the mountain."

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DoomsDave

I think its a worth a shot trying.

If its too expensive to have one shipped why not plant one in a very large container and it put it in a a huge green house during winter? I'm sure someone in SoCal has a big enough green house? Although it would take some time to reach maturity it would be by far the cheapest and easiest way. Even bringing it indoors for several years would probably increase your chances.

That's been tried, if I recall. By Dr. Darian, if I recall.

And, coconuts don't like being in greenhouses; the atmosphere is too close for their liking.

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KennyRE317

I assume you'd have to address the soil importing issue. Don't imported plants to CA have to be certified that they are grown on benches in a media that's not "dirt"? How do you field grow a coconut on a bench in not dirt?

But don't they bring in huge field grown Washies? How do they do that? Maybe my point is not valid.

They bring washies into CA? But why? They grow like weeds out here. My dad lives off the long beach channel and when you look out over the channel to the other side all you see are volunteer washies

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Zeeth

I think its a worth a shot trying.

If its too expensive to have one shipped why not plant one in a very large container and it put it in a a huge green house during winter? I'm sure someone in SoCal has a big enough green house? Although it would take some time to reach maturity it would be by far the cheapest and easiest way. Even bringing it indoors for several years would probably increase your chances.

That's been tried, if I recall. By Dr. Darian, if I recall.

And, coconuts don't like being in greenhouses; the atmosphere is too close for their liking.

Aren't there some fruiting coconuts in a greenhouse at Kew?

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DoomsDave

I think its a worth a shot trying.

If its too expensive to have one shipped why not plant one in a very large container and it put it in a a huge green house during winter? I'm sure someone in SoCal has a big enough green house? Although it would take some time to reach maturity it would be by far the cheapest and easiest way. Even bringing it indoors for several years would probably increase your chances.

That's been tried, if I recall. By Dr. Darian, if I recall.

And, coconuts don't like being in greenhouses; the atmosphere is too close for their liking.

Aren't there some fruiting coconuts in a greenhouse at Kew?

Well, Kew's website says the Tropical House has them, but not if they're fruiting or not.

Which likely illustrates the difficulties. Even someone like Dr. D can't replicate the breezy tropical conditions they like, but maybe they can in a giant glasshouse, as big as an aircraft hangar.

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LJG

I am going to see if the zoo would give it a try.

would be a great showpiece for them as the plants at the zoo are more valuable than the animals and they know it.

i am hoping someone has PROOF it wont work and stops me.

for example: lets say that some major nurseryman brought in 5 coco's -full grown- to try it and all died the first winter. Some kind of solid evidence............... :bemused:

Rob, now you are talking crazy. It is called a "Zoo" for a reason. I don't see people lined up to see Coconut over a Panda anytime soon.

Good luck on your venture. Keep us posted.

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PalmatierMeg

If you have the disposable income, patience and time to bring an adult fruiting coconut to So Cal, go for it with the understanding the palm will never fruit again even if it does survive. With enough disposable income you could build a huge conservatory for the coconut so it can enjoy tropical conditions. Just don't cash in the kids' college fund. And if you have the powers of persuasion to talk San Diego Zoo into funding your project, why not? But if I were the zoo I'd be asking you for your credentials and expertise in growing coconuts in So Cal. Being a palm lover probably won't cut it. And while cocos may be rare in SD they are common as dirt in many parts of the world.

Also, parden the heresy, some people/palm lovers think coconuts are just plain ugly.

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Gonzer

I am going to see if the zoo would give it a try.

would be a great showpiece for them as the plants at the zoo are more valuable than the animals and they know it.

i am hoping someone has PROOF it wont work and stops me.

for example: lets say that some major nurseryman brought in 5 coco's -full grown- to try it and all died the first winter. Some kind of solid evidence............... :bemused:

Rob, now you are talking crazy. It is called a "Zoo" for a reason. I don't see people lined up to see Coconut over a Panda anytime soon.

Good luck on your venture. Keep us posted.

Len, actually this time Rob is correct (or is close). At one time in the 70's and into the 80's (don't know about now) the entire botanical collection of the Zoo was worth closer to 3X the price of the animals. I'm not sure if this included the Big House by the pond.

That said I still think anyone that tries to grow a Cocos successfully out here, much less a full grown one, is, shall we say, a little face-icon-small-confused-1.gif

Edited by Gonzer

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LJG

Goner I might agree on that years ago but not now and certainly not on value. People come to the zoo for the animals. Unless you are a plant nut like us :)

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Hilo Jason

I think its a worth a shot trying.

If its too expensive to have one shipped why not plant one in a very large container and it put it in a a huge green house during winter? I'm sure someone in SoCal has a big enough green house? Although it would take some time to reach maturity it would be by far the cheapest and easiest way. Even bringing it indoors for several years would probably increase your chances.

post-3101-0-85792600-1376441235_thumb.jp

Here's Dr. Darian's Coconut in his pool room in May. If this is as good as they look in a protected climate in California, I'm not sure why anyone would want to try one. Like Bo said, when we can grow so many palms in our climate to look really good, why use up the space for something that won't look good. I'm all for pushing my zone a bit, but Coconuts just don't like it in California, end of the story. They don't look good, and IF you can somehow keep it alive, it will never actually grow Coconuts, so what's the point of having a coconut? That's what we have Beccariophoenix and Parajubaea for. Same look, but they actually like it here.

I'll take this anyday out here over a sickly coconut! This is Len's Beccariophoenix Madagascariensis in full sun, looking amazing. "Chris In Murrieta" for scale.

post-3101-0-54353600-1376441721_thumb.jp

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Zeeth

I thought his pool room was heated. Why does it look so beat up?

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paulgila

I am going to see if the zoo would give it a try.

would be a great showpiece for them as the plants at the zoo are more valuable than the animals and they know it.

i am hoping someone has PROOF it wont work and stops me.

for example: lets say that some major nurseryman brought in 5 coco's -full grown- to try it and all died the first winter. Some kind of solid evidence............... :bemused:

i'd like to go with you,dewd, i wanna see the king of the zoo's face when you march up & demand that the zoo import & plant a full grown coconut at its own expense :mellow:

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Gtlevine

You would need a transporter like in Star Trek. If you drive it over it will be dead before you get it to Texas.

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rprimbs

You would need a transporter like in Star Trek. If you drive it over it will be dead before you get it to Texas.

Naw, just rent a big truck with a refrigerated 52 foot semi-van. You can keep it at any temperature that you want and you can load it up with a bunch of palm trees. It doesn't take that long to drive across the country. Just drive them in! I'm sure that there are other nuts who would join in :evil:

Edited by rprimbs

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US_Marine

yeah that is a ratty looking coconut but I've seen many queens and other palms just as ratty. Whats cool is that coconut palm is fruiting. Whats the story behind this palm? This is the first I've heard of it. I personally don't think that coconut or the new port one looks all that bad. I'd love to have them in my yard. Too bad I live in Northern California lol.

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