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aztropic

They grow up so quickly!

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aztropic

After raising this 11 year old Bismarckia from a 1 gallon seedling,I decided it was time to do it all over again.

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Hammer

Awwwww yeeeahhhh!

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aztropic

April 15,2012 , I planted out this 1 gallon strap leaf seedling that I had grown from seed.

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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doranakandawatta

Scott,

Does he generate many car accident?

Congratulations, nice baby!

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aztropic

Just 16 months later,here is what it looks like today.This one,like the original,is planted in a full sun exposure without ANY shade.Went through a mid 20's freeze this past winter,unprotected,and is growing like a weed.Still fairly rare to see in Arizona, but they have proven themselves to be a tough and reliable species that anybody could grow.

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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BS Man about Palms

Gopher food in So cal... :(

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Kim

They look so good in lots of sun! Nice job growing it up!

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Alberto

Scott,

Does he generate many car accident?

Congratulations, nice baby!

If this Bismarckya will not cause an accident, at least it will cause a pain in the neck for drivers....

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KennyRE317

i think your edging border is useless for your big bizzy. i'm still in search of a good bizzy substitute for here in socal for a smaller yard

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Kris

nice, though this palm has a male name.it still looks very beautiful and glamourus.

thanks for the visuals.

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aztropic

i think your edging border is useless for your big bizzy. i'm still in search of a good bizzy substitute for here in socal for a smaller yard

If you are looking for the impact of blue,but in a smaller size, go for a Chamaerops humillis var argentata (pic) or a Copernicia alba. They are just as tough and hardy.

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Brahea Axel

The hot Arizona Summers is just what a bizzie needs.

Kenny, get a brahea super silver, they look like mini versions of a bizzie.

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KennyRE317

The hot Arizona Summers is just what a bizzie needs.

Kenny, get a brahea super silver, they look like mini versions of a bizzie.

I have a couple 5gal super silvers that are still super green, but they were up potted a month ago from oversized 1gals

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aztropic

Update! Only 4 years in the ground from a 1 gallon,and still a superb grower...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.38.31.jpg

2016-07-04 09.39.11.jpg

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aztropic

Update on the large one from first pic in this thread... About 14 years old from a 1 gallon.It's been seeding for 3 years now.Hand pollinated it for seed 2 years ago with great success,skipped last year but trying again this year although temps were in the hundred teens already so may not be as successful.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.40.08.jpg

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Danilopez89
1 hour ago, aztropic said:

Update! Only 4 years in the ground from a 1 gallon,and still a superb grower...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.38.31.jpg

2016-07-04 09.39.11.jpg

Not quite as fast as trioderob's, but still very nice! 

 

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Danilopez89
1 hour ago, aztropic said:

Update on the large one from first pic in this thread... About 14 years old from a 1 gallon.It's been seeding for 3 years now.Hand pollinated it for seed 2 years ago with great success,skipped last year but trying again this year although temps were in the hundred teens already so may not be as successful.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.40.08.jpg

Perfect!:greenthumb:

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Silas_Sancona
8 hours ago, aztropic said:

Update on the large one from first pic in this thread... About 14 years old from a 1 gallon.It's been seeding for 3 years now.Hand pollinated it for seed 2 years ago with great success,skipped last year but trying again this year although temps were in the hundred teens already so may not be as successful.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.40.08.jpg

Looks good.. How are the rest of the palms looking after June's "Blast Furnace" Heat wave?

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aztropic

I saw 119F...  Palms all did very well;orchids,not so much :(

Only palms scorched were Parajubaea tor tor,Gaussia princeps,and Arenga engleri. These three are exposed to full western sun for the most part and other examples of these 3  in shadier areas had no problem.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

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Palm Tree Jim
4 hours ago, aztropic said:

I saw 119F...  Palms all did very well;orchids,not so much :(

Only palms scorched were Parajubaea tor tor,Gaussia princeps,and Arenga engleri. These three are exposed to full western sun for the most part and other examples of these 3  in shadier areas had no problem.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

That is hot, 119F and in full sun all day. Certainly does say something about bizzies taking heat!

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PalmTreeDude
23 hours ago, aztropic said:

Update on the large one from first pic in this thread... About 14 years old from a 1 gallon.It's been seeding for 3 years now.Hand pollinated it for seed 2 years ago with great success,skipped last year but trying again this year although temps were in the hundred teens already so may not be as successful.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-04 09.40.08.jpg

Amazing!

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Danilopez89
5 hours ago, aztropic said:

I saw 119F...  Palms all did very well;orchids,not so much :(

Only palms scorched were Parajubaea tor tor,Gaussia princeps,and Arenga engleri. These three are exposed to full western sun for the most part and other examples of these 3  in shadier areas had no problem.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

I'm very interested in seeing some pics of your Gaussia Princeps.:yay:

I wanted to try one here ever since I saw one in person. But I wasn't sure if it would take our cold or extreme hot weather here. 

Edited by Danilopez89

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aztropic

Gaussia princeps southern exposure fried;eastern exposure a lot better! The one that fried just opened a new frond... Both have been in the ground several years.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-05 17.15.39.jpg

2016-07-05 17.12.41.jpg

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Danilopez89
6 hours ago, aztropic said:

Gaussia princeps southern exposure fried;eastern exposure a lot better! The one that fried just opened a new frond... Both have been in the ground several years.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

2016-07-05 17.15.39.jpg

2016-07-05 17.12.41.jpg

Very nice! Thanks for the pics.

The first seems to have stretched out fronds. Does it get shaded out sometime at all?

What do you think their cold hardiness is on them? Same as bottle palms or better? 

 

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aztropic

First one does get shaded all winter... Actually a very hardy species...

Besides princeps, I also have gomez -pompae and attenuata. All are good to at least the mid 20's in the desert.(I never protect mine) Similar to a royal palm I imagine.Slower growing though only 2 new fronds per year.

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

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Pete in Paradise Hills
On 7/5/2016, 8:55:01, PalmTreeDude said:

Amazing!

Beautiful bizzie

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Danilopez89
12 hours ago, aztropic said:

First one does get shaded all winter... Actually a very hardy species...

Besides princeps, I also have gomez -pompae and attenuata. All are good to at least the mid 20's in the desert.(I never protect mine) Similar to a royal palm I imagine.Slower growing though only 2 new fronds per year.

aztropic

Mesa, Arizona

Awesome! Thanks for the info on these palms. Alot more cold hardy than I imagined them to be.

Can't wait until I get some for my yard. 

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Las Palmas Norte
On ‎8‎/‎10‎/‎2013‎ ‎11‎:‎03‎:‎20‎, KennyRE317 said:

i think your edging border is useless for your big bizzy. i'm still in search of a good bizzy substitute for here in socal for a smaller yard

Have you considered Brahea armata? Some nicely silvery ones to try.

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aztropic

Add just 2 more years and BOTH bizzies have grown exponentially!

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15365376562644113433970232014338.jpg

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aztropic

The smaller one is out of control.I think it needs a bigger tree ring! 

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15365380957421875309304921272596.jpg

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Darold Petty

Can you tell us the frequency and quantity of irrigation water ?  Thanks

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aztropic

Twice a week over the summer when it's growing;once a month over the winter unless we get a good winter rainstorm.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Now 7 years in the ground from a 1 gallon...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15531891077064519856978982988262.jpg

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aztropic

17 years from a 1 gallon for comparison.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15531894861991175947078561865109.jpg

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DoomsDave

scream

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Palm Tree Jim

The growth rate over the years is just insane!

They clearly are in the right climate as they explode.

Mine does not exhibit this kind of growth rate.

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palmfriend

Scott, 

Thank you for posting all of these images! A couple of months ago I got my first sprouts from (rps) seeds and 

I am really really looking forward to give this species a try over here - probably the first Bismarckias at all on this

island...

I just got one question: How you would you describe the intensity of your Arizona sun? I know it can get very hot

over there, but how about the intensity - I am sorry, no other word comes to mind at the moment. Over here, plastic

just vaporizes when left outside for two, three years; working in full sun during the mid summer without a hat is almost

suicidal while the temperatures never get higher than 35C/95F...

I have got my first one strap seedling already out in the garden in half shade to get it used to the sun - what do you think:

Can they take full from early on or should I wait until they have reached a certain stage?

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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aztropic

Bismarckia definitely can take full sun right from the beginning.This species thrives with the most brutal,burning,direct sun.Our summer temps average around 110F with a few days between 115F- 120F most years.Summer sun on bare skin does feel burning hot but extremely low humidity keeps you dry.Sometimes,not a single cloud in the sky...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Kevin S

 Very cool seeing a little palm grow up.

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PalmatierMeg
41 minutes ago, palmfriend said:

Scott, 

Thank you for posting all of these images! A couple of months ago I got my first sprouts from (rps) seeds and 

I am really really looking forward to give this species a try over here - probably the first Bismarckias at all on this

island...

I just got one question: How you would you describe the intensity of your Arizona sun? I know it can get very hot

over there, but how about the intensity - I am sorry, no other word comes to mind at the moment. Over here, plastic

just vaporizes when left outside for two, three years; working in full sun during the mid summer without a hat is almost

suicidal while the temperatures never get higher than 35C/95F...

I have got my first one strap seedling already out in the garden in half shade to get it used to the sun - what do you think:

Can they take full from early on or should I wait until they have reached a certain stage?

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

Lars, here in FL Bizzies can take blazing sun from the moment of germination. Humidity and tropical rainfall don't faze them in summer nor does scant rain during winter dry season. Tough palms.

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