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Cocoa Beach Jason
4 minutes ago, Zeeth said:

Pacific tall generally refers to the Niu Vai type coconuts, whereas Panama tall is a specific variety of Niu Vai coconut. 

So Panama Tall os a subtype of Pacific Tall. Great. Thanks.

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Matthew92

Coconut palm at my relative's place in Homestead, FL. There used to be at least 4 or 5 others. I was told that some of the parentage was from lethal yellowing resistant trees, but not strictly. I think this was sometime in the 80's. Some did get lethal yellowing and died, but the remaining one proves to be hardy and vigorous and bears well. 

569a7f47bee08_DisneyCruiseMattsCamera170

569a7f39085c3_DisneyCruiseMattsCamera164

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Matthew92

Another picture of it more recently. When I visited in 2010 or so, it had actually gotten cold damaged. They get much colder that far inland in the Redlands.569ae82f504dc_MattsCamera233.thumb.JPG.8

 

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Coco Bonsai

the cocos nucifera / coconut tree in pot more than 5 years old, treated using bonsai technique .....

 

1314_3232736034677_896901733_n.jpg

Edited by Coco Bonsai
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Cocoa Beach Jason
4 hours ago, Coco Bonsai said:

the cocos nucifera / coconut tree in pot more than 5 years old, treated using bonsai technique .....

 

1314_3232736034677_896901733_n.jpg

Wow. Didn't expect to see a bonsai cocos. Epic.

Edited by Cocoa Beach Jason

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Mr. Coconut Palm
On ‎1‎/‎16‎/‎2016‎ ‎11‎:‎36‎:‎41‎, Opal92 said:

Coconut palm at my relative's place in Homestead, FL. There used to be at least 4 or 5 others. I was told that some of the parentage was from lethal yellowing resistant trees, but not strictly. I think this was sometime in the 80's. Some did get lethal yellowing and died, but the remaining one proves to be hardy and vigorous and bears well. 

569a7f47bee08_DisneyCruiseMattsCamera170

569a7f39085c3_DisneyCruiseMattsCamera164

I wish us coconut fanatics could get some viable nuts from this Lethal Yellowing resistant palm.  I wonder if it is a Jamaican Tall, as some Jamaicans I have seen in Florida are quite resistant to the disease and show no signs of Tetracycline treatments.

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Matthew92
9 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

I wish us coconut fanatics could get some viable nuts from this Lethal Yellowing resistant palm.  I wonder if it is a Jamaican Tall, as some Jamaicans I have seen in Florida are quite resistant to the disease and show no signs of Tetracycline treatments.

I'll have to ask my Uncle again if he remembers what parentage it had. I don't know much about coconut variants, but it's interesting that this one is tall growing and yet the trunk is not as thick as "tall" varieties. And though I don't have a picture of it, the base of this one is not swollen at all, just the same width all the way up. Also to me, the leaves don't look like a "tall" variety.

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palmsOrl

I'm under the impression that the Malaysian dwarf varieties can eventually get just as tall (or nearly so) as the so-called "tall" varieties, like the Jamaican tall.  The dwarf varieties do start producing at a younger age and while still shorter in height, and do produce smaller coconuts than "tall" Cocos types.  That palm in the photo in Homestead looks like a pure dwarf type to me, and the fact that there is no swelling at the base of the trunk is more evidence suggesting it is a (green) Malaysian dwarf.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
8 minutes ago, palmsOrl said:

I'm under the impression that the Malaysian dwarf varieties can eventually get just as tall (or nearly so) as the so-called "tall" varieties, like the Jamaican tall.  The dwarf varieties do start producing at a younger age and while still shorter in height, and do produce smaller coconuts than "tall" Cocos types.  That palm in the photo in Homestead looks like a pure dwarf type to me, and the fact that there is no swelling at the base of the trunk is more evidence suggesting it is a (green) Malaysian dwarf.

You are probably right.  It is probably a very robust healthy Green Malayan, but I have seen some Jamaican Talls that have little if any swelling at the base and sometimes have fairly straight trunks too.

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palmfriend

Here are some from South Okinawa. They don`t have the look like those in Hawaii but I am just

glad to have them here!

009X.thumb.jpg.8b08f72e40d8eb0fce67bf8d9

best regards

palmfriend

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 hours ago, palmfriend said:

Here are some from South Okinawa. They don`t have the look like those in Hawaii but I am just

glad to have them here!

009X.thumb.jpg.8b08f72e40d8eb0fce67bf8d9

best regards

palmfriend

 

Lars, those are nice looking.  I would be happy if mine could get as big as the shortest one in the photo and have a few decent sized nuts on them one day.

John

P.S.  I love the true BLUE sky there!  Here in Texas, it has probably been about fifty years since we had skies that blue.

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palmfriend
9 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Lars, those are nice looking.  I would be happy if mine could get as big as the shortest one in the photo and have a few decent sized nuts on them one day.

John

P.S.  I love the true BLUE sky there!  Here in Texas, it has probably been about fifty years since we had skies that blue.

John, thank you for your kind comment! I have just started growing cocos nucifera as well - two are from the local store, the others

are "hand picked" - meaning; collected at the beach when they were washed ashore.

001.thumb.jpg.eba5aee21228ac8194a9335c10

This is the first of all, it is probably six years old now. The photo is already half a year old, so it is now

around 4 feet taller and it has started to trunk. :D

best regards

Lars

PS: Yes, our sky is sometimes simply amazing, especially the sunsets are sometimes breathtaking!

I would love to post pictures but it would go beyond the scope of this topic/forum...

 

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
7 hours ago, palmfriend said:

John, thank you for your kind comment! I have just started growing cocos nucifera as well - two are from the local store, the others

are "hand picked" - meaning; collected at the beach when they were washed ashore.

001.thumb.jpg.eba5aee21228ac8194a9335c10

This is the first of all, it is probably six years old now. The photo is already half a year old, so it is now

around 4 feet taller and it has started to trunk. :D

best regards

Lars

PS: Yes, our sky is sometimes simply amazing, especially the sunsets are sometimes breathtaking!

I would love to post pictures but it would go beyond the scope of this topic/forum...

 

 

You're welcome Lars.  That is a nice looking Coconut Palm you have.  I think it is a Golden Malayan Dwarf, judging by the size of the palm and the color of the petioles, but I could be wrong since there are so many different varieties of them.  Go ahead and post some photos of the sunsets, especially if you can get some photos silhouetting Coconut Palms against the beautiful sunset, then you could cover both bases, showing us the beautiful sunsets and keeping with the theme of the thread!

John

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palmfriend
2 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

You're welcome Lars.  That is a nice looking Coconut Palm you have.  I think it is a Golden Malayan Dwarf, judging by the size of the palm and the color of the petioles, but I could be wrong since there are so many different varieties of them.  Go ahead and post some photos of the sunsets, especially if you can get some photos silhouetting Coconut Palms against the beautiful sunset, then you could cover both bases, showing us the beautiful sunsets and keeping with the theme of the thread!

John

John, thank`s again!

After going through my files I would like to put some photos of cocos nucifera I have taken during the last years - actually I could

flood the forum with pictures of them - which somehow impressed or touched me in a certain way. I just love them!

Ok, enough theory - here we go:

001.thumb.jpg.65bb9071d16ea389250b18945b

This one is from the Aitutaki atoll of the Cook Islands. (2005)

002.thumb.jpg.e4d20f10547a4d31812959a6b6

Some atoll, different beach.(2005)

003.thumb.jpg.9c3ea0186a1faa262dc35bdee2

Tahiti (2008, our honeymoon)

004.thumb.jpg.509a252a4a5450a313790f90d2

That was my view from our little cottage where we stayed almost three weeks - EVERY evening! It is BURNED in my mind and that is what keeps my

driving planting my own cocos in our yard.

005.thumb.jpg.3ab82e5146a524153fffdac4df

The one on the right is the last one (of two) I bought at our local store, the other four are from coconuts I found on the beach.

007.thumb.jpg.08a26dc1e9324fd711af77b415

That was my fale when I went to Samoa in 2001. The interesting thing is that the whole hut is made out of parts from coconut palms...

And the last one:

008.thumb.jpg.cc6f3d90b7082aa42ca8171571

This is an "overwater fale" in Samoa where I stayed a week or so, same material like the one in the photo above. (at least the overwater section)

It looks so tiny and somehow weak, facing the open sea. I must have been crazy staying in there. But it was definitely an outstanding experience!

Ok, that`s it for the moment. Someone may call this post a "love letter to the cocos nucifera" - no problem, I sign it!;)

PS: Regarding a sunset photo from our island with a coconut tree, that won`t be easy because our coconut palms here are usually not close

to the beach. The typhoons are sometimes really extremely strong and that makes it almost impossible for them to grow. But I am on it!

 

best regards

 

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Zeeth

It's cool that you've got so many coconuts from ones you've found at the beach! I wish they were more commonly seen at the beach here. I've only ever found two, and they never sprouted. 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 hours ago, Dr Roland Bourdeix said:

A stripped coconut

For more rare coconut pictures, see our blog: http://coconutvietnam.blogspot.fr/, Sections on farmer's varieties and National genebank. 

 

 

 

Stripped coconut.jpg

Roland, thanks for posting those photos.  I have never seen a coconut like that before.

John

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palmfriend
2 hours ago, Zeeth said:

It's cool that you've got so many coconuts from ones you've found at the beach! I wish they were more commonly seen at the beach here. I've only ever found two, and they never sprouted. 

Well, during the summer it is almost impossible to find them because the beaches are usually cleaned up

of everything for the tourists, including coconuts. So, may biggest chances are in winter when it's off-season and 

no one is around. Chances of getting one sprouted are one or two out of ten, but that's ok. As long as you

can hear the liquid inside the coconut, there might be a chance. But you never know if it is the milk or

seawater. You have to be patient and you have to keep them potted because of ants and other insects.

I think they smell the milk somehow and biting their way into it...

The funny thing is, you don't know where they come from and what kind of coconut palm it will be. You

might get an idea when you know something about the shape of the coconut and their size but that is

still beyond my knowledge. 

I am happy when I find a coconut which is still in good condition, so I can give it a try.

best regards

 

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
3 hours ago, palmfriend said:

John, thank`s again!

After going through my files I would like to put some photos of cocos nucifera I have taken during the last years - actually I could

flood the forum with pictures of them - which somehow impressed or touched me in a certain way. I just love them!

Ok, enough theory - here we go:

001.thumb.jpg.65bb9071d16ea389250b18945b

This one is from the Aitutaki atoll of the Cook Islands. (2005)

002.thumb.jpg.e4d20f10547a4d31812959a6b6

Some atoll, different beach.(2005)

003.thumb.jpg.9c3ea0186a1faa262dc35bdee2

Tahiti (2008, our honeymoon)

004.thumb.jpg.509a252a4a5450a313790f90d2

That was my view from our little cottage where we stayed almost three weeks - EVERY evening! It is BURNED in my mind and that is what keeps my

driving planting my own cocos in our yard.

005.thumb.jpg.3ab82e5146a524153fffdac4df

The one on the right is the last one (of two) I bought at our local store, the other four are from coconuts I found on the beach.

007.thumb.jpg.08a26dc1e9324fd711af77b415

That was my fale when I went to Samoa in 2001. The interesting thing is that the whole hut is made out of parts from coconut palms...

And the last one:

008.thumb.jpg.cc6f3d90b7082aa42ca8171571

This is an "overwater fale" in Samoa where I stayed a week or so, same material like the one in the photo above. (at least the overwater section)

It looks so tiny and somehow weak, facing the open sea. I must have been crazy staying in there. But it was definitely an outstanding experience!

Ok, that`s it for the moment. Someone may call this post a "love letter to the cocos nucifera" - no problem, I sign it!;)

PS: Regarding a sunset photo from our island with a coconut tree, that won`t be easy because our coconut palms here are usually not close

to the beach. The typhoons are sometimes really extremely strong and that makes it almost impossible for them to grow. But I am on it!

 

best regards

 

Beautiful photos, Lars.  Thanks again for posting your photos.  I think I speak for all of us Coconut Palm lovers when I say we love the photos.  I could spend hours looking at such photos, but I need to get ready for bed.  It's almost midnight here in Texas, and I need to get up and go to work in the morning.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
2 hours ago, Zeeth said:

It's cool that you've got so many coconuts from ones you've found at the beach! I wish they were more commonly seen at the beach here. I've only ever found two, and they never sprouted. 

Keith,

I have wondered for years why they don't wash up on the beaches frequently in Florida like they do here in Texas.  It is so ironic where you have so many of them growing, even along some of the beaches in Florida, yet you have very few washing up on the beaches there.  I think there may be more washing up than you think, but with so many tourists and Florida residents living so close to the water, maybe they get picked up within minutes of washing up.

John

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Zeeth
6 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Keith,

I have wondered for years why they don't wash up on the beaches frequently in Florida like they do here in Texas.  It is so ironic where you have so many of them growing, even along some of the beaches in Florida, yet you have very few washing up on the beaches there.  I think there may be more washing up than you think, but with so many tourists and Florida residents living so close to the water, maybe they get picked up within minutes of washing up.

John

There are some secluded beaches that I go to that no one really knows about unless they've lived in the area for a while. I still never see any coconuts there. 

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Dr Roland Bourdeix

Hello, please see this picture, and the links to many other coconut pictures:

Coconut palm cultivation and use in Vietnam

Coconut palms of Samoa

Cocotiers from French Polynesia

Coconut freaks!

Coconut palms of Tetiaroa

Coconut art

1. Australia - 2. Benin - 3. Brazil - 4. Cameroon - 5. Comoro - 6. Cook Islands - 7. South Korea - 8. Côte d'Ivoire - 9. Dominique (island) - 10. Fiji - 11. France - 12. Ghana - 13. Guadeloupe - 14. India - 15. Indonesia - 16. Italy - 17. Jamaica - 18.Japan - 19. Kenya - 20. Malaysia - 21. Mayotte - 22. Mexico - 23. Mozambique - 24. New Caledonia - 25. New Zealand - 26. Oman (Sultanat) - 27. Papua New Guinea - 28. Philippines - 29. French Polynesia - 30. Reunion (île) - 31. Solomon (islands) - 32. Samoa - 33. Singapour - 34. Sri Lanka - 35. Tanzania - 36.  Czech Republic - 37. Thailand - 38. Togo - 39. Tonga - 40. Tuvalu - 41. Vanuatu - 42. Vietnam 

 

 

 

coconut shapes.JPG

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palmfriend
11 hours ago, Dr Roland Bourdeix said:

Hello, please see this picture, and the links to many other coconut pictures:

Coconut palm cultivation and use in Vietnam

 

Coconut palms of Samoa

 

Cocotiers from French Polynesia

 

Coconut freaks!

 

Coconut palms of Tetiaroa

 

Coconut art
 

 

1. Australia - 2. Benin - 3. Brazil - 4. Cameroon - 5. Comoro - 6. Cook Islands - 7. South Korea - 8. Côte d'Ivoire - 9. Dominique (island) - 10. Fiji - 11. France - 12. Ghana - 13. Guadeloupe - 14. India - 15. Indonesia - 16. Italy - 17. Jamaica - 18.Japan - 19. Kenya - 20. Malaysia - 21. Mayotte - 22. Mexico - 23. Mozambique - 24. New Caledonia - 25. New Zealand - 26. Oman (Sultanat) - 27. Papua New Guinea - 28. Philippines - 29. French Polynesia - 30. Reunion (île) - 31. Solomon (islands) - 32. Samoa - 33. Singapour - 34. Sri Lanka - 35. Tanzania - 36.  Czech Republic - 37. Thailand - 38. Togo - 39. Tonga - 40. Tuvalu - 41. Vanuatu - 42. Vietnam 

 

 

 

coconut shapes.JPG

Thank you very much for posting the links and the picture! What a phantastic piece of work!

I have been through those links a while ago but it takes time to get a trained I eye to distinguish all the diferent varieties well.

Nevertheless the scale is a very great help - especially when I have found a coconut on the beach. :D

I guess the mostly washed up coconuts on our shore are from the Philippines and probably Malaysia/Indonesia -

a big dream would be a Niu Afa from Samoa (but I have my doubts that it would do well during our winters, when sprouted).

However, thank you very much again!

best regards

palmfriend

 

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Mr. Coconut Palm
15 hours ago, Zeeth said:

There are some secluded beaches that I go to that no one really knows about unless they've lived in the area for a while. I still never see any coconuts there. 

Keith, then it must have something to do with your currents on the Gulf side of Florida and your lack of wave action.  The first time I visited the beach on your side of Florida, I was shocked that there are NO waves.  I thought I was looking at a small inland lake or even a stock tank on a ranch here in Texas because of the lack of waves.  Here we typically have 2 to 3ft. waves at the beach, and often have 3 to 4ft. waves that help push the nuts right up to the beach at high tide and the currents come straight out of the southern Gulf and Bay of Campeche up this direction from about March until October, bringing probably at least a thousand or more nuts per year to the Texas beaches.  My palm society buddy and I have picked up over 200 in a days time along a 65 mile stretch of Padre Island.  One of my favorite places, though to look for them is north of here along the beach at Matagorda Peninsula.  I have found some nice large viable nuts there.  Actually there seems to be a higher percentage of big nuts that are viable that float up along that stretch of the Texas Coast.  Those nuts may be from western Cuba or the Yucatan though since our prevailing southeast winds may push them all the way across the Gulf, whereas most if not all of the ones washing up here at Padre Island I think come from the Gulf Coast of Mexico a couple of hundred miles to my south where they Mexican Tall grows.  One of these days, I would like to explore Matagorda Island (not Matagorda Peninsula that I mentioned above).  Matagorda Island is about one of the last remaining unspoiled beaches left on the Texas Coast.  There is no one living there, and you can't drive there.  You can only reach the island by boat or sea plane, and I think that stretch of Gulf beach probably has a lot of nice big viable coconuts that wash up there with all the Sargassum every year.  There are probably even some sprouted nuts there, since that part of the coast gets more rainfall than here.  I have met people who have found sprouted nuts on the beach here at Padre Island, so I know in the warmer months of the spring and summer there are probably more nuts that sprout at Matagorda due to the higher rainfall.  By the way, supposedly there is a small colony of small Red Mangroves that have become established on the bay side of Matagorda Island.

John

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Mr. Coconut Palm
13 hours ago, Dr Roland Bourdeix said:

Hello, please see this picture, and the links to many other coconut pictures:

Coconut palm cultivation and use in Vietnam

 

Coconut palms of Samoa

 

Cocotiers from French Polynesia

 

Coconut freaks!

 

Coconut palms of Tetiaroa

 

Coconut art
 

 

1. Australia - 2. Benin - 3. Brazil - 4. Cameroon - 5. Comoro - 6. Cook Islands - 7. South Korea - 8. Côte d'Ivoire - 9. Dominique (island) - 10. Fiji - 11. France - 12. Ghana - 13. Guadeloupe - 14. India - 15. Indonesia - 16. Italy - 17. Jamaica - 18.Japan - 19. Kenya - 20. Malaysia - 21. Mayotte - 22. Mexico - 23. Mozambique - 24. New Caledonia - 25. New Zealand - 26. Oman (Sultanat) - 27. Papua New Guinea - 28. Philippines - 29. French Polynesia - 30. Reunion (île) - 31. Solomon (islands) - 32. Samoa - 33. Singapour - 34. Sri Lanka - 35. Tanzania - 36.  Czech Republic - 37. Thailand - 38. Togo - 39. Tonga - 40. Tuvalu - 41. Vanuatu - 42. Vietnam 

 

 

 

coconut shapes.JPG

There are so many different varieties of Coconut Palms!  I read somewhere years ago, that there is over 600 different varieties worldwide throughout the tropics and warmer subtropics!

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Zeeth

Coconut growing along the shore in Manatee county. 

 

IMG_5004.thumb.JPG.55f871235a550e01962ce

 

IMG_5018.thumb.JPG.c0db6468642eaeb4df516

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Zeeth

Here's a coconut growing in mangroves in Sarasota. I actually have offspring from this one.

 

IMG_5042.thumb.jpg.2fbd0a1d76ec89cdc1de9

 

IMG_5043.thumb.JPG.dd1092cac148508ea85d7

 

IMG_5044.thumb.JPG.763357e664549d84f0a52

 

This is the offspring that I sprouted during the summer of 2013.

IMG_4885.thumb.JPG.de19a34be2b44a9702595

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 hours ago, Zeeth said:

Coconut growing along the shore in Manatee county. 

 

IMG_5004.thumb.JPG.55f871235a550e01962ce

 

IMG_5018.thumb.JPG.c0db6468642eaeb4df516

I bet that made your day, Keith.  It sure would make my day if I could find one or two like that at Boca Chica (the Rio Grande Delta), and I would certainly be tempted to take it with me, but would probably leave it there.  Did you see my post earlier on one of these threads where I theorize that a few of them probably grew naturally to maturity at the Rio Grande Delta a couple of hundred years ago before the clear cutting of the native palm forest along the Rio Grande.  I think rainfall was about 34 to 35+ inches per year back then and some nuts probably sprouted along the beach at the delta then and grew to maturity.  There are many Black Mangroves there and some Red Mangroves too with seeds on them along the tidal creeks just inland from the beach.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
4 hours ago, Zeeth said:

Here's a coconut growing in mangroves in Sarasota. I actually have offspring from this one.

 

IMG_5042.thumb.jpg.2fbd0a1d76ec89cdc1de9

 

IMG_5043.thumb.JPG.dd1092cac148508ea85d7

 

IMG_5044.thumb.JPG.763357e664549d84f0a52

 

This is the offspring that I sprouted during the summer of 2013.

IMG_4885.thumb.JPG.de19a34be2b44a9702595

What variety is that one again?  The offspring sure looks like a Golden Malayan with the really golden petioles and light colored leaves, but the parent looks more like a small bowl Jamaican Tall, which I have seen some of, or a Maypan.

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Zeeth
28 minutes ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

What variety is that one again?  The offspring sure looks like a Golden Malayan with the really golden petioles and light colored leaves, but the parent looks more like a small bowl Jamaican Tall, which I have seen some of, or a Maypan.

Not positive what the variety of this one is, but I think it's the offspring of a Maypan. The coconuts are too round to be a Jamaican tall, but not round enough to be a Panama tall. The one that I have has been a lot hardier to cold than any Malayan I've tried though. The above picture was taken recently, and many of the coconuts in this area were pretty badly beaten up by the long cool of January and February.

 

I could imagine coconuts being present in the areas you've talked about getting them from. I'm hoping the one in Manatee county grows to fruiting maturity. I'll be keeping an eye on it every once in a while to see how it does. 

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Silas_Sancona

Keith,

I was just going to post a couple pictures of the Selby duo for ya.

56d3b6b1af176_DSCN0291(555x740).jpg.a3e256d3b6c84f5c2_DSCN0292(555x740).jpg.5994

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mistifarang

Some recycled products of the coconut tree; I think not very well known.

 

IMG_5113 klein.jpg

IMG_5110 klein.jpg

IMG_5108 klein.jpg

IMG_9552 fs klein.jpg

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Mr. Coconut Palm
1 hour ago, Zeeth said:

Not positive what the variety of this one is, but I think it's the offspring of a Maypan. The coconuts are too round to be a Jamaican tall, but not round enough to be a Panama tall. The one that I have has been a lot hardier to cold than any Malayan I've tried though. The above picture was taken recently, and many of the coconuts in this area were pretty badly beaten up by the long cool of January and February.

 

I could imagine coconuts being present in the areas you've talked about getting them from. I'm hoping the one in Manatee county grows to fruiting maturity. I'll be keeping an eye on it every once in a while to see how it does. 

Keith, what has your experience been with the cold hardiness of Maypans?   The one I have in the ground that is about 3.5ft. tall and experienced a light frost with temps of 33.6F about 10 days after I planted it, only got a tiny bit of the little speckling spots on the outer part of the leaves as a result of it and kept on growing.  It does have the typical Potassium deficiency that South Texas coconuts get in the winter (but not too bad), but my little Mexican Tall, also hit be the frost wasn't even phased and was in the ground in probably the coldest part of the yard and has very little Potassium deficiency.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
1 hour ago, Zeeth said:

Not positive what the variety of this one is, but I think it's the offspring of a Maypan. The coconuts are too round to be a Jamaican tall, but not round enough to be a Panama tall. The one that I have has been a lot hardier to cold than any Malayan I've tried though. The above picture was taken recently, and many of the coconuts in this area were pretty badly beaten up by the long cool of January and February.

 

I could imagine coconuts being present in the areas you've talked about getting them from. I'm hoping the one in Manatee county grows to fruiting maturity. I'll be keeping an eye on it every once in a while to see how it does. 

I wonder how that one got there, since as you have said they don't seem to wash up on Florida's beaches/shores like they do here.

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Mr. Coconut Palm
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Keith,

I was just going to post a couple pictures of the Selby duo for ya.

56d3b6b1af176_DSCN0291(555x740).jpg.a3e256d3b6c84f5c2_DSCN0292(555x740).jpg.5994

Nathan, where is Selby?  Are those Jamaican Talls?

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Mr. Coconut Palm
1 hour ago, mistifarang said:

Some recycled products of the coconut tree; I think not very well known.

 

IMG_5113 klein.jpg

IMG_5110 klein.jpg

IMG_5108 klein.jpg

IMG_9552 fs klein.jpg

Is the first photo of a coconut ashtray?  The third, coconut mulch?  And the last one, a coconut broom?  What is the second one?

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Pip

A bird house or nesting box

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mistifarang
1 hour ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Is the first photo of a coconut ashtray?  The third, coconut mulch?  And the last one, a coconut broom?  What is the second one?

1. an opened and shelled coconut used to plant miniature plants

2. a shelled and later closed coconut used as a birds-nest

3. coconut mulch (for certain plants)

4 an broom made out of the leaves

all used in Thailand

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mistifarang

Pampanga - Olaguapa, the Philippines

 

beach resort verbeterd.jpg

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Zeeth
8 hours ago, Mr. Coconut Palm said:

Keith, what has your experience been with the cold hardiness of Maypans?   The one I have in the ground that is about 3.5ft. tall and experienced a light frost with temps of 33.6F about 10 days after I planted it, only got a tiny bit of the little speckling spots on the outer part of the leaves as a result of it and kept on growing.  It does have the typical Potassium deficiency that South Texas coconuts get in the winter (but not too bad), but my little Mexican Tall, also hit be the frost wasn't even phased and was in the ground in probably the coldest part of the yard and has very little Potassium deficiency.

I've never tried any F1 Maypans, so I'm not sure how the real ones are, but the offspring of Maypans are highly variable in all of their traits, including cold hardiness. I had another one sprouting at the same time as my orange one when my yard saw 32˚ and a light frost. The other Maypan offspring had heavy spotting, but the orange one had no damage. 

Selby gardens is in north Sarasota right by the water. I emailed the plant curator once about the coconuts, and they told me that they're a "Lethal yellowing resistant variety", but they're not sure which one (probably Maypan), and they were planted sometime between 1986-1988. 

Coconuts sometimes wash up onto the shore, but very rarely. The ones that do usually aren't viable. This one was washed up on the same location, but it wasn't viable.

IMG_4965.thumb.JPG.64fea2e791354faed21d0

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