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empireo22

Please share your pics of coconuts from around the world. I will start.......

Cocos nucifera in Sebastian, Florida

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Zeeth

That's a very nice Jamaican tall! Here are some

Two Jamaican talls at Kopsick in St. Pete

CocosnuciferaJamaicanTall4.jpg

Here's one in Jamaica. It looks like Jamaican tall to me, which is surprising considering LY

IMG_2591.jpg

Here's a fatty growing in Cozumel. I think it's Panama tall.

IMG_2608.jpg

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Xerarch

C'mon Newport Beach! You know someone is going to do it sooner or later

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palmsOrl

I just got my Jamaican Tall in the mail from PR today. It will be going into a pot for a year or two then into the ground, here in Orlando. I have ordered 5-6 of these online over the past decade but they always died, since they were all shipped bare root. Apparently, Cocos will not tolerate this. Anyways, this one was shipped with soil and I have high hopes for it. I will, of course, protect it whenever necessary until it gets too tall. I hope to have photos in a few years.

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tropicbreeze

My Cocos nucifera var. reclinata

pt_n_130804_05.jpg

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Cindy Adair

I have to admit that I don't have many coconut photos from our farm. Just like in Virginia, what's common doesn't make me think to grab the camera. I'll try to remedy that next week and maybe someone can even help naming mine. I'm told I have several different kinds, but can't sort them out.

Oh, I'm surprised they can't take being bare-rooted. When I must move sprouted seeds to keep my entire farm from being nothing but coconuts, I'd been putting them in a pile of vines/weeds. Of course they resprouted there. The seeds are able to roll down the hills when they fall and end up far from the tree.

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redant

Please share your pics of coconuts from around the world. I will start.......

Cocos nucifera in Sebastian, Florida

You may want to grab a couple of nuts from that one, good genes to survive there!

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Brahea Axel

I am affraid that since they won't grow here I would have to settle for one of these:

http://m.alibaba.com/product/241635195/artificial_coconut_tree_outdoor_palm_tree.html#

On the upside these fake coconut trees are looking more and more realistic all the time. :) Add a pink flamingo and an old truck on four blocks...

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palmsOrl

I find that odd about bare root Cocos as well, since this species seems generally so tough (except to cold). Every time I have tried a mail order bare root Jamaican Tall, it would promptly die. I had been thinking it was a fungus so the last couple tries I immediately treated with systemic fungicide upon arrival and they still died. Recently, I did some online research and others on certain gardening forums say the exact same thing. Bare root Jamaican Talls do not survive long after being shipped.

That specimen in Sebastian is beautiful and it must have survived the 2010 cold/freezes. I only know of one that survived in the Orlando area, at a hotel near Seaworld.

Those Panama Talls are amazing. I love the fat trunk. A Bahama Breeze restaurant nearby had one of these growing inside(!) many years ago when it first opened (it looked exactly like the one in the photo). It was not there for long though.

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empireo22

I find that odd about bare root Cocos as well, since this species seems generally so tough (except to cold). Every time I have tried a mail order bare root Jamaican Tall, it would promptly die. I had been thinking it was a fungus so the last couple tries I immediately treated with systemic fungicide upon arrival and they still died. Recently, I did some online research and others on certain gardening forums say the exact same thing. Bare root Jamaican Talls do not survive long after being shipped.

That specimen in Sebastian is beautiful and it must have survived the 2010 cold/freezes. I only know of one that survived in the Orlando area, at a hotel near Seaworld.

Those Panama Talls are amazing. I love the fat trunk. A Bahama Breeze restaurant nearby had one of these growing inside(!) many years ago when it first opened (it looked exactly like the one in the photo). It was not there for long though.

That one pictured is about 100 feet from the Indian river in a nice microclimate, most along the river made it through 2010, but where I live a mile from the river about 50% died (just guessing) and you can see the old trunks in some peoples yard. There are a few tall variety coconuts in Sebastian the rest I believe are maypans. I wish there was a nursery that sold specific cultivars.

Please continue to add Coconut pictures to the thread....even the newport coconut .....

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Daryl

Here's a couple of local coconuts at 28S...about the limit for fruiting in eastern Oz

post-42-0-53031700-1375657605_thumb.jpg

post-42-0-20236200-1375657592_thumb.jpg

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Jeff in St Pete

A mixture of Pacific Talls and Dwarf Coconuts along the beach in Manuel Antonio

post-747-0-02557300-1375657727_thumb.jpg

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Daryl

OK, seeing as we are talking Coconuts, I have a Coconut question...how do you identify these varieties? Everyone says this is a Jamaican tall, Pacific tall, Panama tall etc....what are the defining traits? Over here in Oz, there are so many different coconuts, petiole colour, trunk size, nut colour /shape/size, leaf colour, leaf habit, tree height, leaf length etc I wouldn't have a clue what varieties these are, except for the Malay dwarfs which are very diminutive here (and look different to the Malay Dwarfs I've seen in photos from the Americas).

Daryl

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Zeeth

Daryl, after reading through the Dave Romney book on coconuts (he is regarded as a coconut expert in these parts), I think I might be able to answer your question at least somewhat. One problem is that the named varieties here are different from the names elsewhere, and we only have a few varieties here so it's only difficult because it's a little muddied up by hybridization. The Malayan dwarves here originated from a few trees brought to Jamaica after hurricanes in 1944 and 1951 hit the island, they imported dwarves to test hurricane resistance. Although dwarves are self pollinating, seeds from maypan and Jamaica tall palms have been used to grow "malayan" coconuts by unknowledgeable nurseries, so many "dwarves" here are some type of Fn (n being some number greater than or equal to 1) maypan or mayjam, exhibiting a variety of characteristics intermediate between the two. Pure Malayans are ideally grown from someone who knows the origins of the coconut, and the pure ones look much like the ones in Australia, with a slim trunk and short (but not as short as a fiji dwarf) trunk. They have no bowl at the base also and medium length leaves. This is in contrast to a fiji dwarf, which has a thick trunk and some bowl with short leaves. Spicata are easy to tell, with the nuts all growing on one branchlet. There are two types of tall type here, Panama (or Pacific) and Jamaica (or Atlantic). The Jamaica tall has late germinating (50% sprouting by 14-16 weeks), elongated fruits with 18% of the weight of the seed being the water inside. The Panama tall has early germinating (50% sprouting by 10-12 weeks) large oblate fruit, with 33% of the weight due to water. The Panama tall is somewhat faster, producing a trunk on average of 33 feet by 30 years, with the Jamaica tall producing a trunk of 30 feet in the same amount of time. Both tall types in Florida are attributed to having either green or bronze/green petiole color, though Jeff has posted some that have golden petioles. Both produce a bole with long leaves and a thick trunk, though Jamaica tall curves more, which is attributed to being more top heavy when it first develops trunk, so wind coupled with soggy soil can cause the palm to fall somewhat and develop the lean. Neither are self pollinating, so any coconuts from a tall will have one parent being a different palm, so nuts collected from these ideally should be hand pollinated or at least grown right next to another of the same type (as the two at Kopsick grow). I've heard that Panama tall grows a more umbrella shaped crown, while Jamaica tall has leaves extending all the way down, but I've seen Panama talls have leaves extending all the way down so I think this characteristic can be variable in the Panama tall. I don't think it's variable in the Jamaica tall. There is a semi-tall coconut called the king coconut which has many characteristics of the tall types, including a bowl at the base and a thick trunk, but is self fertile and has orange nuts and petioles. It's possible that this is the variety of tall that Jeff has posted in the past with orange nuts and petioles. Those are the only coconuts in cultivation in Florida. There's one called a nawassi at Fairchild that I haven't been able to find much info on, only that it's from the Philippines.

William, I too tried to grow a Jamaican tall that was shipped bareroot and had the same problem. I ended up being able to get coconuts to sprout from the coconuts at Kopsick, but I've read that Puerto Rico has no LY, so it still has many Jamaican talls, so your source may prove to be good as well.

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DCdesertpalm

Don't laugh. This is an experiment out in Indio, Ca (Palm Springs area). This coco has been in the backyard since late May. The temps have been +100* in June. July hit 117*, 118*, and 120*. Now a steady 102*-108*.

I sure hope the coco makes it. Love to see it grow up like the pictures above.

post-6966-0-63458300-1375670784_thumb.jp

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Xerarch

Don't laugh. This is an experiment out in Indio, Ca (Palm Springs area). This coco has been in the backyard since late May. The temps have been +100* in June. July hit 117*, 118*, and 120*. Now a steady 102*-108*.

I sure hope the coco makes it. Love to see it grow up like the pictures above.

Good experiment, I'd think the hot deserts of California might stand a better chance at a coconut than the coastal areas, and I've heard rumors of an imperial valley coconut on this forum that was supposed to have existed in the past. I've also seen photos of coconuts in rocky point (puerto peñasco) Mexico, which isn't too far, so good luck!

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bubba

It should be noted that Carl Jung had a vivid reoccurring dream in his latter years that he titled "the Salton Sea Cocoanut". It seemed that the dream featured a journey through a lowland exotic area on what appeared to be a seashore. During the dream, his group encountered a large glade of perfectly grown mature and fruiting "Panama Talls". The snowfall was no more than three inches that dusted the ground through the area the group trod. The Jungian Motif attributed to the dream was framed as "juxtaposed sensibilities".

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palmsOrl

I wouldn't hesitate to try one in a protected (and well irrigated) spot if I lived in Palm Springs.

Zeeth, thank you for all the info on Cocos varieties. My new palm actually has "orangey" petioles, which I seem to recall on some of the previous Jamaican Tall sprouts I had ordered. It definitely appears different from the Malayan Dwarfs (I have both a green and a yellow) so that is encouraging. I will post a photo shortly.

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Kim

It should be noted that Carl Jung had a vivid reoccurring dream in his latter years that he titled "the Salton Sea Cocoanut". It seemed that the dream featured a journey through a lowland exotic area on what appeared to be a seashore. During the dream, his group encountered a large glade of perfectly grown mature and fruiting "Panama Talls". The snowfall was no more than three inches that dusted the ground through the area the group trod. The Jungian Motif attributed to the dream was framed as "juxtaposed sensibilities".

Check your sources, bubba, I'm fairly sure the designation "Panama Talls" and most certainly the legend of the "Salton Sea Cocoanut" (sic) post-date the life of Carl Jung. You have tripped onto some anecdotal urban legends, I fear. Or tripped on something else... :hmm:

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The Palm Nut

This is my little baby from seed, starting to take off after a few years. There are a couple at South West Rocks about one hour north from Port Macquarie 30 plus feet of trunk, I checked them out a few weeks ago and they look great. Going back up there in 6 weeks for a gig so will take some pictures of them.

Cheers

Mike

post-250-0-07321900-1375686014_thumb.jpg

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bubba

Brother Carl entered in 1875 and transcended in 1961. Have to agree that it is unlikely the term Panama Tall had been coined during his walkabout. However, the spelling Cocoanut likely prevailed during his round. All streets in PB, named during contemporary Henry Flagler's reign, suffer this correct/incorrect spelling. Read any F. Scott Fitzgerald novel and you will encounter the same appellation.

The compelling story of an unknowing young teacher, who drops coconuts indiscriminately around the Salton Sea that grow and flourish in perfection until his sudden unexplained departure, is the epic of triumph. We all want triumph. We all want to overcome that which may seem impossible. Bad form to play trickster with this great human quality.

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Jonathan

Brother Carl entered in 1875 and transcended in 1961. Have to agree that it is unlikely the term Panama Tall had been coined during his walkabout. However, the spelling Cocoanut likely prevailed during his round. All streets in PB, named during contemporary Henry Flagler's reign, suffer this correct/incorrect spelling. Read any F. Scott Fitzgerald novel and you will encounter the same appellation.

The compelling story of an unknowing young teacher, who drops coconuts indiscriminately around the Salton Sea that grow and flourish in perfection until his sudden unexplained departure, is the epic of triumph. We all want triumph. We all want to overcome that which may seem impossible. Bad form to play trickster with this great human quality.

Esoteric...the philosophy of palms as a hobby as opposed to palms as a hobby for their own sake.

Certainly it seems an uphill fight here today in the cold and the wind of late winter - still I expect to triumph once again come spring!

Thanks for the tangent Bubba.

Cheers,

Jonathan

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Brahea Axel

Brother Carl entered in 1875 and transcended in 1961. Have to agree that it is unlikely the term Panama Tall had been coined during his walkabout. However, the spelling Cocoanut likely prevailed during his round. All streets in PB, named during contemporary Henry Flagler's reign, suffer this correct/incorrect spelling. Read any F. Scott Fitzgerald novel and you will encounter the same appellation.

The compelling story of an unknowing young teacher, who drops coconuts indiscriminately around the Salton Sea that grow and flourish in perfection until his sudden unexplained departure, is the epic of triumph. We all want triumph. We all want to overcome that which may seem impossible. Bad form to play trickster with this great human quality.

You're definitely onto something here. :)

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empireo22

Thanks everyone for the pictures and replies. Please keep them both coming!

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Miccles

Just north of Cairns, Queensland.

Regards

Michael.

post-953-0-41113100-1375833167_thumb.jpg

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Will

Ubud, Bali

post-332-0-34305900-1375834598_thumb.jpg

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Edited by Will

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Will

Gili Meno, Lombok

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Edited by Will

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Al in Kona

While Cocos nucifera are very common palms here in Kona, not many that take on this twisting trunk characteristic. Anyone know what causes this to happen? Pacific tall being by far the most common but there is variability even among them, especially in the leaf, some more lax, others a bit more stiff. Samoan dwarf is cultivated and to a lesser degree Malayan dwarf.

The Coconut palm is actually one of our hardier palms (not talking about cold tolerance), withstanding poor soils, drought and wind. Be careful where u plant them as the big heavy nuts and leaves will fall and can to damage to people, cars, plants, etc. below!

post-90-0-87449600-1375837115_thumb.jpg

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Will

That thing looks like it's ready to attack!

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Hammer

My avatar is coconut palms on a motu on Bora Bora in French Polynesia.

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picudodelapalma

Palmas en Puerto Vallarta Jalisco México.Sanas libres de la temible plaga del picudo de la palma.

En varias partes del mundo estamos siendo atacados por este insecto.

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post-7911-0-15471200-1376184777_thumb.jp

Edited by picudodelapalma

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empireo22

Cocos nucifera (possibly Malayan Dwarf) in Sebastian, FL

Thanks to everyone who has posted.....please keep the pics coming....

post-6650-0-71063500-1376239916_thumb.jp

post-6650-0-06356900-1376240255_thumb.jp

Edited by empireo22

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Walter John

Daryl, after reading through the Dave Romney book on coconuts (he is regarded as a coconut expert in these parts), I think I might be able to answer your question at least somewhat. One problem is that the named varieties here are different from the names elsewhere, and we only have a few varieties here so it's only difficult because it's a little muddied up by hybridization. The Malayan dwarves here originated from a few trees brought to Jamaica after hurricanes in 1944 and 1951 hit the island, they imported dwarves to test hurricane resistance. Although dwarves are self pollinating, seeds from maypan and Jamaica tall palms have been used to grow "malayan" coconuts by unknowledgeable nurseries, so many "dwarves" here are some type of Fn (n being some number greater than or equal to 1) maypan or mayjam, exhibiting a variety of characteristics intermediate between the two. Pure Malayans are ideally grown from someone who knows the origins of the coconut, and the pure ones look much like the ones in Australia, with a slim trunk and short (but not as short as a fiji dwarf) trunk. They have no bowl at the base also and medium length leaves. This is in contrast to a fiji dwarf, which has a thick trunk and some bowl with short leaves. Spicata are easy to tell, with the nuts all growing on one branchlet. There are two types of tall type here, Panama (or Pacific) and Jamaica (or Atlantic). The Jamaica tall has late germinating (50% sprouting by 14-16 weeks), elongated fruits with 18% of the weight of the seed being the water inside. The Panama tall has early germinating (50% sprouting by 10-12 weeks) large oblate fruit, with 33% of the weight due to water. The Panama tall is somewhat faster, producing a trunk on average of 33 feet by 30 years, with the Jamaica tall producing a trunk of 30 feet in the same amount of time. Both tall types in Florida are attributed to having either green or bronze/green petiole color, though Jeff has posted some that have golden petioles. Both produce a bole with long leaves and a thick trunk, though Jamaica tall curves more, which is attributed to being more top heavy when it first develops trunk, so wind coupled with soggy soil can cause the palm to fall somewhat and develop the lean. Neither are self pollinating, so any coconuts from a tall will have one parent being a different palm, so nuts collected from these ideally should be hand pollinated or at least grown right next to another of the same type (as the two at Kopsick grow). I've heard that Panama tall grows a more umbrella shaped crown, while Jamaica tall has leaves extending all the way down, but I've seen Panama talls have leaves extending all the way down so I think this characteristic can be variable in the Panama tall. I don't think it's variable in the Jamaica tall. There is a semi-tall coconut called the king coconut which has many characteristics of the tall types, including a bowl at the base and a thick trunk, but is self fertile and has orange nuts and petioles. It's possible that this is the variety of tall that Jeff has posted in the past with orange nuts and petioles. Those are the only coconuts in cultivation in Florida. There's one called a nawassi at Fairchild that I haven't been able to find much info on, only that it's from the Philippines.

William, I too tried to grow a Jamaican tall that was shipped bareroot and had the same problem. I ended up being able to get coconuts to sprout from the coconuts at Kopsick, but I've read that Puerto Rico has no LY, so it still has many Jamaican talls, so your source may prove to be good as well.

What a terrific piece of information on Cocos nucifera, thank you for providing same. I picked up a Malay dwarf coconut yesterday in fact, so I am like Daryl with regard to interest in any ID info etc.

If it's true what they say that plants respond to sounds and music, I wonder what tunes the coconut would like. B)

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ErikSJI

Some Coconut photos of some places I visited.

Molokai Hawaii,post-1930-0-36287200-1376265624_thumb.jp

King Kamehameha coconut grove Molokai Hawaiipost-1930-0-02214000-1376265665_thumb.jp

My cousin getting us some coconuts Maui Hawaiipost-1930-0-83426700-1376265769_thumb.jp

My daughter Maui HIpost-1930-0-78236900-1376265823_thumb.jp

Lil Coconut grove FLpost-1930-0-84918900-1376266059_thumb.jp

Floridapost-1930-0-72585300-1376266147_thumb.jp

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palmsOrl

CocosJamaicanTall1.jpg?t=1376713337post-2050-0-61169100-1376713467_thumb.jp

Okay, I promised photos of my new Jamaican Tall. Here it is. It is doing extremely well so far.

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palmsOrl

CocosJamaicanTall2.jpg?t=1376713351ee

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palmsOrl

Sorry if the photos are too large or the text is off. I haven't posted photos on here in a long time. That last photo is a closeup of the petioles and base of the palm. This palm definitely looks quite CocosPacificTall1.jpg?t=1376713368different than both the green and golden Malaysian Cocos I have seen (and own). From what I recall, it looks like most of the other seedlings of Jamaican Tall I had seen quite some time ago. I also ordered what I assume to be a Pacific Tall from Hawaii. The nut (the half that is left) on this one is huge.

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Walt

The two below Cocos nucifera are growing up in Sebring, Florida. They were planted about 7-8 years ago. They were hurt during the January and December of 2010 cold, but not totally defoliated.

CoconutpalmsSebringFlorida_zpseac7518a.j

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Daryl

Daryl, after reading through the Dave Romney book on coconuts (he is regarded as a coconut expert in these parts), I think I might be able to answer your question at least somewhat. One problem is that the named varieties here are different from the names elsewhere, and we only have a few varieties here so it's only difficult because it's a little muddied up by hybridization. The Malayan dwarves here originated from a few trees brought to Jamaica after hurricanes in 1944 and 1951 hit the island, they imported dwarves to test hurricane resistance. Although dwarves are self pollinating, seeds from maypan and Jamaica tall palms have been used to grow "malayan" coconuts by unknowledgeable nurseries, so many "dwarves" here are some type of Fn (n being some number greater than or equal to 1) maypan or mayjam, exhibiting a variety of characteristics intermediate between the two. Pure Malayans are ideally grown from someone who knows the origins of the coconut, and the pure ones look much like the ones in Australia, with a slim trunk and short (but not as short as a fiji dwarf) trunk. They have no bowl at the base also and medium length leaves. This is in contrast to a fiji dwarf, which has a thick trunk and some bowl with short leaves. Spicata are easy to tell, with the nuts all growing on one branchlet. There are two types of tall type here, Panama (or Pacific) and Jamaica (or Atlantic). The Jamaica tall has late germinating (50% sprouting by 14-16 weeks), elongated fruits with 18% of the weight of the seed being the water inside. The Panama tall has early germinating (50% sprouting by 10-12 weeks) large oblate fruit, with 33% of the weight due to water. The Panama tall is somewhat faster, producing a trunk on average of 33 feet by 30 years, with the Jamaica tall producing a trunk of 30 feet in the same amount of time. Both tall types in Florida are attributed to having either green or bronze/green petiole color, though Jeff has posted some that have golden petioles. Both produce a bole with long leaves and a thick trunk, though Jamaica tall curves more, which is attributed to being more top heavy when it first develops trunk, so wind coupled with soggy soil can cause the palm to fall somewhat and develop the lean. Neither are self pollinating, so any coconuts from a tall will have one parent being a different palm, so nuts collected from these ideally should be hand pollinated or at least grown right next to another of the same type (as the two at Kopsick grow). I've heard that Panama tall grows a more umbrella shaped crown, while Jamaica tall has leaves extending all the way down, but I've seen Panama talls have leaves extending all the way down so I think this characteristic can be variable in the Panama tall. I don't think it's variable in the Jamaica tall. There is a semi-tall coconut called the king coconut which has many characteristics of the tall types, including a bowl at the base and a thick trunk, but is self fertile and has orange nuts and petioles. It's possible that this is the variety of tall that Jeff has posted in the past with orange nuts and petioles. Those are the only coconuts in cultivation in Florida. There's one called a nawassi at Fairchild that I haven't been able to find much info on, only that it's from the Philippines.

William, I too tried to grow a Jamaican tall that was shipped bareroot and had the same problem. I ended up being able to get coconuts to sprout from the coconuts at Kopsick, but I've read that Puerto Rico has no LY, so it still has many Jamaican talls, so your source may prove to be good as well.

Thanks for the info Keith. I almost forgot about this thread!

Daryl

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empireo22

Thanks to everyone who has added to this thread.....and to keep it going.....Cocos nucifera 'Atlantic Tall' West Palm Beach, Florida.

post-6650-0-22628600-1377030050_thumb.jp

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