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greekpalm

Butia or Jubaea for coastal mainland western europe ?

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greekpalm

Which of those two is best for a colder(zone 8a and 8b, with extremes up to -17C) atlantic(constant rainy yearlong, between 700 and 900mm annually) climate(summer temperatures around 20 and 22C)

UK is excluded because they have warmer winters, sunnier annually, and less rain.

Also I should mention that air is humid the whole air through.

So which one should have a higher probability to survive (with minimal winter protection), and the higher possibility to grow faster ?

(trivia knowledge: this area has an population of around 18 Million )

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Edited by greekpalm

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greekpalm

in faster growth i do mean leafs per year, and not about the trunk on the palm

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buffy

Butia eriospatha. Hunt down Nigel on this forum.

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Flow

Neither Butia nor Jubaea will take -17 for a longer time with only light protection.

If you're willing to protect them I'd go for the most beautiful in your eyes.

Butia eriospatha does seem like a good choice though.

I've only a Jubaea planted out and it doesn't have any problems with high rainfall (around 1200mm)

Edited by Flow

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DoomsDave

For what it's worth, there are some large Jubes in southwestern France, facing the Atlantic.

I'll see if I can dig up some pictures.

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Phoenikakias

For what it's worth, there are some large Jubes in southwestern France, facing the Atlantic.

I'll see if I can dig up some pictures.

If southwestern France faces the Antlatic, then the coastal french part next to Spain facing the med is what?

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Alicehunter2000

South and Southeast and the part right next to Spain..... East....? Is this a trick question? What do I win?

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Phoenikakias

I was thinking that South East part of France is the one bordering to Italy, you know Cote d'Azure, Menton, Nice, Cannes, the famous european film festival etc while diagonally on the opposite side, facing Atlantic is the North West part, but again maybe I am wrong or I live in another dimension :bemused:

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JasonD

I think a Butia X Jubaea hybrid would be a pretty good option. Or Jubaea X Butia.

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_Keith

I think a Butia X Jubaea hybrid would be a pretty good option. Or Jubaea X Butia.

I am a tad warmer, but my Jubutia is slow, and I mean SLOWWWW.

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sarasota alex

Based on what I am reading in our Ukrainian/Russian forum, Jubaeas perform much better than Butias in Eastern Europe where they are considered to be the hardiest of all pinnate-leafed palms. There are some growing unprotected in zone 7 in Czech Republic.

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greekpalm

thank you guys! also people have been reporting similar reports in belgium and the netherlands, Jubaea seems to be the winner... ill focus on it from next sping.

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