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cold hardy blue palms

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sonoranfans

I consider 9a and below cold hardy zones since perhaps only 5% of all palms are tough enough to handle 9a. The choices for palms in cold hardy zones does include a large number of blue or bluish colored palms. I was thinking that some examples would be useful for the cold hardy gardener who doesnt know of allt he choices and how they look. I'll start it off with Brahea Clara, a nice blue palm that can take down to 20F or so and it can also take some "florida style" humidity. Brahea clara is also a pretty fast growing palm in my yard. this one was bought in jan 2011 as a strap leaf seedling from Tejas tropicals, called Brahea Clara "icy blue". I was a bit disappointed in the color before I planted it out in full sun in feb 2012. I am now a happy customer as the blue color is very armata like Anybody else out there have a blue or bluish cold hardy palm(bluish is great too!) that you would like to share?

Edited by sonoranfans

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sonoranfans

sabal uresana and serenoa repens silver can also show a bluish color. this uresana was from tejas as well received at the same time as a seedling going palmate. Both of these palms should be good to zone 8b.

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Alberto

1- Copernicia alba (from seeds of the southern most habitat in Santa Fé - Argentina (+"tropical origin queen from São Paulo state)

2 and 3- Trthrinax schyzophilla ( seeds from Argentina)

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Alberto

1- Copernicia alba (from seeds of the southern most habitat in Santa Fé - Argentina (+"tropical origin queen from São Paulo state)

2 and ( seeds from Argentina)

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sonoranfans

I just ran across this pic of serenoa repens silver that I took in a park near clearwater florida a few years back. When I saw these, I knew I had to have some. again, these are probably 8b palms

Edited by sonoranfans

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Alberto

.

post-465-0-65527800-1370734230_thumb.jpg

post-465-0-28260400-1370734315_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Butia catarinensis and Nolina nelsonii

post-465-0-87602200-1370733853_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Trachycarpus princeps

post-465-0-14881900-1370734682_thumb.jpg

post-465-0-36744600-1370734902_thumb.jpg

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sonoranfans

Wow alberto lots of nice color there! Trachycarpus princeps is a pretty palm with those white undersides. I also love the bluish butia cararinesis. I also bought a butia yatay recently. Im going to grow it a little bigger before it goes into the ground.

Edited by sonoranfans

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tank

Sabal uresana will likely fade to a blue green. All of my seedlings were a spectacular blue color and have since moved to a more green coloration as they have matured.

My B. yatay is about chest high and is really retaining its color. Does a yatay mule retain any of the color from its Butia parent?

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_Keith

Sabal uresana will likely fade to a blue green. All of my seedlings were a spectacular blue color and have since moved to a more green coloration as they have matured.

My B. yatay is about chest high and is really retaining its color. Does a yatay mule retain any of the color from its Butia parent?

Not too much stays blue here either.

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sonoranfans

Sabal uresana will likely fade to a blue green. All of my seedlings were a spectacular blue color and have since moved to a more green coloration as they have matured.

My B. yatay is about chest high and is really retaining its color. Does a yatay mule retain any of the color from its Butia parent?

Jason,

I also have seen other uresanas go towards green. But there are uresanas that stay very blue, but it appears they are somewhat rare. Mine is about 6' overall or a tad under. I havent seen the color shift much recently. If anything the blue has increased in the past year. It isnt spectacularly blue, just bluish. I have 2 small yatay mules from patric shafer. On the yatay mule, I dont know if they get coloration genes from the butia parent. they are just starting to show division in leaves but are still a medium green, no blue evident. Got any pics of your yatay?

Edited by sonoranfans

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sonoranfans

Sabal uresana will likely fade to a blue green. All of my seedlings were a spectacular blue color and have since moved to a more green coloration as they have matured.

My B. yatay is about chest high and is really retaining its color. Does a yatay mule retain any of the color from its Butia parent?

Not too much stays blue here either.

Keith, you should be able to frow brahea clara, butia yatay, or serenoa repens silver with no problem there. I also saw some stunning blue butia capitata(really odorata?) at jungle music. I was really tempted, but I wanted the yatay which develops a larger crown and thinner more numerous leaflets. Some of those blue capitata were more blue than any of the yatays. There is a mature blue capitata double down the road from my house in florida, its very blue, not on irrigation and about 10' overall. I will try to get a pic when I can.

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Mauna Kea Cloudforest

Alberto, that t. Princeps looks amazing.

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buffy

My Yatay Mule is very green with just a slight hint of blue on the adaxial side of the leaflets.

20130428_200046_zps27993c9b.jpg

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sonoranfans

My Yatay Mule is very green with just a slight hint of blue on the adaxial side of the leaflets.

20130428_200046_zps27993c9b.jpg

What a rocket, as you can see by the increasing length of fronds oldest to newest. this upright mule form is my favorite. It would seem the more upright looking yatay blood is at work here...

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Phoenikakias

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

Edited by Phoenikakias

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sonoranfans

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

Konstantinos, pics pics, please! Everyone with a cold hardy blue/bluish palm should post a pic. I have posted all mine... theophrastii are not a common a phoenix.... I've seen one in the last 10 years...

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_Keith

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

I planted a couple of these seedlings this year. They have only the slightest silver'ish ting at this point. It will be interesting to see what happens as they grow. So far, the only thing that seems to stay silver so far is my B. capitata, and to a lesser degree my P. sylvestris. Another silver palm would be a nice addition.

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Phoenikakias

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

I planted a couple of these seedlings this year. They have only the slightest silver'ish ting at this point. It will be interesting to see what happens as they grow. So far, the only thing that seems to stay silver so far is my B. capitata, and to a lesser degree my P. sylvestris. Another silver palm would be a nice addition.

Patience please, I will post pictures a.s.a.p. predictably on Sunday. Keith, when you write seedlings you mean still with only strap leaves? If it is so, yes indeed originally they are green but they turn with age to silver. I am not sure today, whether this depends only on enviromental or also on soil conditions, after having read the liming topic of Mr Bradford...

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_Keith

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

I planted a couple of these seedlings this year. They have only the slightest silver'ish ting at this point. It will be interesting to see what happens as they grow. So far, the only thing that seems to stay silver so far is my B. capitata, and to a lesser degree my P. sylvestris. Another silver palm would be a nice addition.

Patience please, I will post pictures a.s.a.p. predictably on Sunday. Keith, when you write seedlings you mean still with only strap leaves? If it is so, yes indeed originally they are green but they turn with age to silver. I am not sure today, whether this depends only on enviromental or also on soil conditions, after having read the liming topic of Mr Bradford...

My seedlings, which were gifts are just starting to send out their first pinnate leaves. With our high humidity and rainfall rates I will be excited if they hold on to the silver.

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Grasswing

Try Nannorrhops ritchiana, high cold tolerance and nice blue-grey color too. I've got some seeds.

Regards

Andrew

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Kailua_Krish

Nannorrhops has been darn near impossible here. Ive tried several and they they just get smaller rather than growing larger until they finally die.

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sonoranfans

Nannorrhops has been darn near impossible here. Ive tried several and they they just get smaller rather than growing larger until they finally die.

Nannorrhops is a desert palm like brahea armata and washingtonia filifera, its not surprising that it hates florida humidity.

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turfpro01

I did a bunch of nannorhops from seed and most died after 2-3 leaves. I though I was a real bad grower. Then I talked to another guy who did a few thousands seeds and had 1 plant to show me. Said they just start dying, he tried different soil mixes ect. They just don't like the cold wet winter when there small. Guess they don't like humidity at all in the summer. When they get past a certain size they take it in the winter, I have a 15g that does very good and have seen some larger ones in the ground, in central CA.

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Phoenikakias

I did a bunch of nannorhops from seed and most died after 2-3 leaves. I though I was a real bad grower. Then I talked to another guy who did a few thousands seeds and had 1 plant to show me. Said they just start dying, he tried different soil mixes ect. They just don't like the cold wet winter when there small. Guess they don't like humidity at all in the summer. When they get past a certain size they take it in the winter, I have a 15g that does very good and have seen some larger ones in the ground, in central CA.

Are you talking about Nannorhops stockiana (that is the silver nanno) or ritchieana (that is the green-blue nanno)? Former is considerably less cold hardier than latter and imo it has to be treated like a Hyphaena. Use only pumice as pot medium and you get constant and rapid growth without unpleasant surprises. But beware of root pruning, very sensitive, therefore never let roots growing from the pot bottom penetrate to another medium or soil. If you want afterwards to repot or outplant nanno you will have to prune those roots and this will probably be fatal. Green-blue nanno is on the contrary much hardier to all those aspects but equally less fast growing and of course not waxy-silver. (At least this is my humble opinion).

Edited by Phoenikakias

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buffy

I have zero problems with Nanno. I've lost a spear at 15F as a three leaf seedling, but on it goes. Drainage is everything. They'll take plenty of wet, but they need drainage.

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Kailua_Krish

I even tried mine in sand that washingtonia struggles to establish in because its so dry (it's that sand that refuses to get wet even after rain). Also I tried one in my cactus garden which is a little moister but still very dry. Both places had what I would call excellent drainage, so I think there may be a soil problem or something. I had heard these might be susceptible to nematodes.

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tank

Definitely something in the soil, whether its nematodes or something else. I've seen nice ones in Florida.

I have been successful with Nannorhops "kashmir". Have two others in the same area that I purchased as beautiful large 3 gal "standard silver" Nannorhops plants at a sale at Montgomery BG. Continued to look great for a few months in their pots here in North Florida. They began to decline as soon as I stuck them in the ground. They now look like the living dead.

Merrill Wilcox has related to me that he believed his success was based on him planting his plant right up against the house. Apparently nematodes do not like the soil under the slab, or perhaps the ph of the soil is more to the liking of the plant.

Here is my little kashmir. Its about 5 years old, 3 years in the ground.


post-526-0-13800100-1371386559_thumb.jpg

Edited by tank

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Phoenikakias

I am very surprised that Phoenix theophrastii has not yet been mentioned in this topic. Depending on sun exposure, air humidity, temperature and age it becomes quite silver and in fact more silver than some dactylifera cultivars. At least this is true for mediterranean climates, that is with warm and dry summers. I wonder how it looks like in moist climates (that is with warm, humid and rainy summers). Also I wonder how it grows in floridian skeletal soils, I think it should grow well (provided it is given plenty of water), if it cal tolerate summer humidity. In one of its habitats it grows next to seashore in sand and gravels with abundant underground water.

Konstantinos, pics pics, please! Everyone with a cold hardy blue/bluish palm should post a pic. I have posted all mine... theophrastii are not a common a phoenix.... I've seen one in the last 10 years...

Now here it comes! Due to the light conditions and my poor phone-camera I am not sure whether pics show the true colors. I have tried to take pics at different times of same day and from various perspectives. First pics have been taken in midday and last one at dawn.

post-6141-0-24020900-1371449592_thumb.jp (in the background can bee seen P. dactylifera medjool for comparison)

post-6141-0-09674900-1371449822_thumb.jp (in the background can bee seen P. dactylifera deglet nour for comparison)

post-6141-0-55196000-1371449932_thumb.jp (on the left side of this pic can bee seen a leaf of a Washingtonia)

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Phoenikakias

post-6141-0-99097300-1371450225_thumb.jp (same plant -correctly plants, cause there are three of them- taken shot of at dawn)

post-6141-0-36821300-1371450357_thumb.jp (leaf deatail, picture at dawn)

post-6141-0-49681900-1371450438_thumb.jp (leaf detail, picture at dawn)

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Phoenikakias

post-6141-0-87182200-1371451014_thumb.jp (a close-up of offshoots still green, pic at dawn)

post-6141-0-78614300-1371451137_thumb.jp (a close-up of surrounding ground to get an idea how stony it is, pic during midday)

A wonderful plant, but unfortunately not for public places due to its very spiny habit (even leaflets are very spiny). A wild, wild thing!

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sonoranfans

Very nice Konstantinos, gorgeous color on those theophrasti! One of the great things about bluish palms is the way they change color at different times of the day, different sun conditions. Even some of the green (with a little blue) copernicia seem to transform to a different hue at different times of the day.

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Zeeth

There's a large Nannorhops growing in Selby gardens in Sarasota so it can be done in Florida

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ThunderSRQ

I have N. arabica & N. ritchiana planted (and have had both of them since Nov. 2011 - one was just planted & the other has been in the ground for a year now). They're in relatively high, dry sandy areas. I did previously lose a N. ritchiana -- I assume from too much water (had it in a different/lower location & didn't know about their dry preference -- I kept watering the poor thing when it started looking bad!) -- so hopefully one of these will make it here in SW Florida.

Also -- what about Trithrinax campestris? It's a beautiful, smallish blue-silver palm (albeit very slow-growing) -- one of my absolute favorites.

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Beach palm

I have a Copernicia prunifera in zone 9a for 14 yrs. It is doing great. It is very blue and has taken down into the mid-20's on numerous occasions. I also have a Copernicia hospita growing at the same location. It is protected by a large sabal so I don't know how it would do unprotected. The hospita is super slow.

Richard

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palmsnbananas

Wow a copernicia hospita in 9A.. seriously don't give me ideas.. I'm already growing way too much stuff I shouldn't be!

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tank

I have both C. prunifera and C. alba doing well in my tundra. Also have a Bizmarck groing under a tall pine canopy. Bizmarck has seen temps into the upper teens, but I have to think that it was substantially warmer where its at. It is still has good color (silver) under the canopy, it just grows really SLOW.

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Shirleypalmpaws

This is a little off topic, but not too way off, and I hope it's okay to bring up........One time, this was some while ago, maybe it was during this past winter, I came across an article that centered around Blue Palms for central Florida. I think it was written by PT member Eric from Orlando---but that may not be correct---and well, now I can't find it anywhere....it's not even in my laptop history. I remember it being titled something along the lines of (paraphrasing), Feeling the Blues, or Got the Blues...something Blues....lol. Cold hardy Blues? Does that ring a bell for anyone? Did I dream it?

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sonoranfans

Yeah I do remember a title like "got the blues" or something. In order to search it, it will be necessary to guess close to the title. In this thread I though it would be interesting to see how many blue colored palms were good to 9a. Surprisingly, most blue palms except blue latan, bismarckia, and copernicia hospita are fine in 9a.

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