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Perito

Jubaea flowering for the first time

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Perito

I just noticed today that my Jubaea chilensis is sending out 4 flower spathes. It has been in the ground 10 1/2 years but I didn't suspect it would flower at this size.

post-1839-0-22995100-1369943060_thumb.jppost-1839-0-41373200-1369943073_thumb.jppost-1839-0-43314100-1369943087_thumb.jp

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Stevetoad

that cool! i never knew they flowered at that size. i spy some queens in the background.... any hybrid attemps in your future?

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Chris Chance

Nice Perry! That's looking good! How big was it when you planted it?

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Perito

Steve, I've never attempted hybridizing cocoid palm species before. Being that it isn't that easy I probably need help!

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Phoenikakias

Hmmm, plant in juvenile stage not as compact as a pure jub usually looks like, in mature stage same palm with still attached leaf bases looks like having a significantly less fat trunk than a pure jub usually has (stripped from leafbases), let alone that it flowers from such an age, while it is commonly believed that a juvenile jub is planted for the next generation to gather the fruits. What else is needed to draw conclusion or at least to make a plausible assumption?

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richnorm

Yes, could it be a hybrid? Young plant looks atypical and then it flowers so early....

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Perito

Hmmm, plant in juvenile stage not as compact as a pure jub usually looks like, in mature stage same palm with still attached leaf bases looks like having a significantly less fat trunk than a pure jub usually has (stripped from leafbases), let alone that it flowers from such an age, while it is commonly believed that a juvenile jub is planted for the next generation to gather the fruits. What else is needed to draw conclusion or at least to make a plausible assumption?

Phoenikakias, I don't see anything you listed as compelling evidence of the tree being hybrid. I'd be more likely to agree if it had any characteristics of another genus such as Butia or Syagrus, but it just isn't there. In ten years since the tree was planted it hasn't faced any adversity that could slow down a healthy Jubaea, thus the accelerated growth rate. As for flowering, the tree was probably 8 to 10 years old when planted; It doesn't seem implausible for a 20 year old Jubaea to flower.

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QUINNPALMS

Awesome,! By far my favorite palm!

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_Keith

It looks great. Congrats.

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Perito

Thanks Nick & Keith, It is one palm that always looks good, even just after Winter!

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Phoenikakias

Hmmm, plant in juvenile stage not as compact as a pure jub usually looks like, in mature stage same palm with still attached leaf bases looks like having a significantly less fat trunk than a pure jub usually has (stripped from leafbases), let alone that it flowers from such an age, while it is commonly believed that a juvenile jub is planted for the next generation to gather the fruits. What else is needed to draw conclusion or at least to make a plausible assumption?

Phoenikakias, I don't see anything you listed as compelling evidence of the tree being hybrid. I'd be more likely to agree if it had any characteristics of another genus such as Butia or Syagrus, but it just isn't there. In ten years since the tree was planted it hasn't faced any adversity that could slow down a healthy Jubaea, thus the accelerated growth rate. As for flowering, the tree was probably 8 to 10 years old when planted; It doesn't seem implausible for a 20 year old Jubaea to flower.

Can you measure the circumference of the trunk? (leaf bases also included). It happens that I have also a 'jub' that though still at juvenile stage has already begun aborting old leaf bases. Estimated trunk diameter would be this way even smaller than this of a fatty Butia. My plant is very healthy and apart from pinnae being more susceptible to wind damage in all other aspects resembles a typical jub. Only fishy element is that it costed much cheaper than normally by then used to cost a jub of same size.

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Perito

Hmmm, plant in juvenile stage not as compact as a pure jub usually looks like, in mature stage same palm with still attached leaf bases looks like having a significantly less fat trunk than a pure jub usually has (stripped from leafbases), let alone that it flowers from such an age, while it is commonly believed that a juvenile jub is planted for the next generation to gather the fruits. What else is needed to draw conclusion or at least to make a plausible assumption?

Phoenikakias, I don't see anything you listed as compelling evidence of the tree being hybrid. I'd be more likely to agree if it had any characteristics of another genus such as Butia or Syagrus, but it just isn't there. In ten years since the tree was planted it hasn't faced any adversity that could slow down a healthy Jubaea, thus the accelerated growth rate. As for flowering, the tree was probably 8 to 10 years old when planted; It doesn't seem implausible for a 20 year old Jubaea to flower.

Can you measure the circumference of the trunk? (leaf bases also included). It happens that I have also a 'jub' that though still at juvenile stage has already begun aborting old leaf bases. Estimated trunk diameter would be this way even smaller than this of a fatty Butia. My plant is very healthy and apart from pinnae being more susceptible to wind damage in all other aspects resembles a typical jub. Only fishy element is that it costed much cheaper than normally by then used to cost a jub of same size.
I won't be able to check it until Monday. How about a photo of your Jubaea?

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Nigel

Should be academic soon enough, simple stamen count cross referenced against the recent Palms article on JxB hybrids and characteristics.

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Phoenikakias

Hmmm, plant in juvenile stage not as compact as a pure jub usually looks like, in mature stage same palm with still attached leaf bases looks like having a significantly less fat trunk than a pure jub usually has (stripped from leafbases), let alone that it flowers from such an age, while it is commonly believed that a juvenile jub is planted for the next generation to gather the fruits. What else is needed to draw conclusion or at least to make a plausible assumption?

Phoenikakias, I don't see anything you listed as compelling evidence of the tree being hybrid. I'd be more likely to agree if it had any characteristics of another genus such as Butia or Syagrus, but it just isn't there. In ten years since the tree was planted it hasn't faced any adversity that could slow down a healthy Jubaea, thus the accelerated growth rate. As for flowering, the tree was probably 8 to 10 years old when planted; It doesn't seem implausible for a 20 year old Jubaea to flower.

Can you measure the circumference of the trunk? (leaf bases also included). It happens that I have also a 'jub' that though still at juvenile stage has already begun aborting old leaf bases. Estimated trunk diameter would be this way even smaller than this of a fatty Butia. My plant is very healthy and apart from pinnae being more susceptible to wind damage in all other aspects resembles a typical jub. Only fishy element is that it costed much cheaper than normally by then used to cost a jub of same size.
I won't be able to check it until Monday. How about a photo of your Jubaea?

Here it is

post-6141-0-73931700-1370017105_thumb.jp

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Chris Chance

Wow what a different looking palm! Thanks for sharing that before picture.

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Perito

Nigel, I haven't read the article yet but I will now, thanks for pointing that out.

Phoenikakias, Very nice tree!

Hey Chris, Thanks! I hope you'll come by some time and see it in person!

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Chris Chance

Ok I will see I get a weekend open I might be able to make a trip that way.that would be really cool!

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Perito

Today- post-1839-0-80411700-1370292118_thumb.jppost-1839-0-68299700-1370292136_thumb.jp

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Phoenikakias

Now I am very anxious to know the result of stamen count cross.

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Perito

I am counting 18, but am having trouble finding the issue of 'Palms' that has the article to cross reference.

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fdrc65

This is my 35 y.o. Jubaea, the diameter of the trunk is 70 cm , it never flower but it survive to -11°C and a lot of snow

8803180740_fca4e6cc35_z.jpg
923230_10201158137145333_1587929212_n.jp

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Phoenikakias

For all of you who find this topic interesting, check this link: http://www.hardy-palms.co.uk/product.asp?section=18&product=61. Ciao Federico, you actually meant diameter or rather circumference? With a diameter of 70 cm circumference would have to be 0.7 X 3.14 = 2,19 m or 219 cm or 6.56 feet! Trunk of your plant does not seem to me that fat...

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WestCoastGal

That's a beautiful palm Perito! We have a butia and two mules. I've never seen Jubaea flowering before so thanks for the photos. What's immediately different to me is the color of the spathe, our palms' spathes are green on the palm and of course the stamen count is different. The other observation that smacks me in the face is the stunning wine color of the inflourescence.

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richnorm

I am counting 18, but am having trouble finding the issue of 'Palms' that has the article to cross reference.

I think Butia has 6 and Jubaea 15 or more.....

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NCpalmqueen

Wow. How nice to live and see it flower. I can't tell from the photo, but how tall is the trunk and its girth Perito? Thank you for posting. A cause for celebration!

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MattyB

Y'all are hybrid crazy! That thing is a pure Jubaea no doubt about it. The small, before, pic looked like it may have been grown in less than full, all day sun, so it wasn't as compact as you might expect. But keep in mind that Perry lives along the central coast of CA, where it's a marine environment. Not exactly hot, inland climate, so I'd expect it to be less compact than something grown farther inland.

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DoomsDave

Baby Jubes in Czecho-[expletive]-Slovakia . . . .

From Wikipedia.

800px-Jubaea_Chilensis.jpg

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Perito

Thanks West Coast Gal! I do like the flower color and what is nice is that it can be seen without a ladder or a binoculars!

Cindy, the trunk is over 3 1/2' in Diameter at 18" above the ground and circumference is 130". It is about 7 1/2' to where the spears start. I remember the day I planted it telling the next door neighbor that I wouldn't live to see it get big! It is nice to see it flower before I'm pushin daisys!

Rich, I'm not sure about stamen count on these palms, I'm gonna have to hunt down the issue of Palms that has the recent article.

Hi Matt, the palm had those streched leaves when I bought it, maybe it had been in a greenhouse before that time. Actually the ones I've grown from seeds here are normal compact Jubs. post-1839-0-19025000-1370393067_thumb.jp

Dave- those are some strapping young Jubaeas!

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