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cdubrule

How to make a booted palm tree slick

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cdubrule

I have a booted sabal palmetto that I want to make slick. It is a mature tree with about 8' of trunk. It was transplanted 3 years ago so I figure it should be able to take whatever minor stress is imposed to remove the boots to make it slick. What kind of tool should I use for this job? Shovel, shears? Do I have to worry about damaging the tree? I'm thinking I'll just do the bottom half to start with. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks, Craig

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ando.wsu

I took a utility knife to my washy, lightly scoring the bottom of the boot at the base, and then peeling it off. Once it got started on the bottom of the trunk, which was difficult, it became very easy.

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Jerry@TreeZoo

You can:

1. Dig up the Sabal, lay it on its side and walking the length of it, use a VERY sharp shovel to cut the boots off. Roll the Sabal to get all sides. Replant when done.

2. Set it on fire. All the boots will burn off and give a unique charred look to the trunk. The fronds should completely resprout and fill out in a couple of years.

3. Wait 10 or 20 years. They will fall off by themselves.

4. Do what Ando said. Start at the bottom. Use what ever cutting tool works for you, a hand saw, cutters or whatever. Try not to pull the boots off if it tears the epidermal layer. Cut it instead. Once you get the first couple of rows done, it gets lots easier. It is very dirty work, you might want to wear a dust mask

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Brahea Axel

Why on earth would you want to do that? The boots is what gives sabals their distinctive look, it's very ornamental. If you want smooth trunk, why not grow a s. causiarum, no peeling necessary, and it's pretty darn hardy too.

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MattyB

Nice one Jerry.

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DoomsDave

Whoa! WTF???

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palmislandRandy

I use a box cutter to clean up trunks. You can set the blade depth on some of them so you don't cut into live tissue. Or what Jerry said. B)

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tjwalters

You can:

1. Dig up the Sabal, lay it on its side and walking the length of it, use a VERY sharp shovel to cut the boots off. Roll the Sabal to get all sides. Replant when done.

2. Set it on fire. All the boots will burn off and give a unique charred look to the trunk. The fronds should completely resprout and fill out in a couple of years.

3. Wait 10 or 20 years. They will fall off by themselves.

4. Do what Ando said. Start at the bottom. Use what ever cutting tool works for you, a hand saw, cutters or whatever. Try not to pull the boots off if it tears the epidermal layer. Cut it instead. Once you get the first couple of rows done, it gets lots easier. It is very dirty work, you might want to wear a dust mask

For number 1, it's easier if you put it on a lathe. If you use your method, you'll need to take a belt-sander to it after removing the boots.

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KennyRE317

Why on earth would you want to do that? The boots is what gives sabals their distinctive look, it's very ornamental. If you want smooth trunk, why not grow a s. causiarum, no peeling necessary, and it's pretty darn hardy too.

Would have to agree

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