Jump to content
Habanero

Does anyone know this Sabal ?

Recommended Posts

Habanero

Hello together,


I'm a new member in this forum. I need help for ident. a Sabal palm, I don't know what kind of it is.

I bought it from a dutch dealer, as Sabal minor, but it is no S. minor.

Well, the problem that I have, I live in Zone 7a , and I don't know the hardiness of the sabal.

Hope anybody can help me.

I hope you understand my english.

smkonplett.jpg

smstamm.jpg

smblatt.jpgf149700153t655536874p999649879n3.jpg

f149700153t655536874p999649879n5.jpg

Best wishes,

Bernd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grasswing

Hello Bernd,

welcome to the forum!

In my opinion it is Sabal palmetto. Leaf bases are white and it is growing more higher than Sabal minor. But be careful with planting it outside, S. palmetto has less low temperatures tolerance than S. minor.

Hope it helped.

Regards Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
empireo22

Welcome to the forum. I also think it it is sabal palmetto. BTW your soil looks great! Is it fast draining?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

Welcome to the forum Bernd!

This is a Sabal minor. The leaf morphology is that of a S. minor. I guess the confusing part is the upright growth with the beginning of a trunk there. It resembles what's known in cultivation as S. minor "Louisiana". However, S. Zona's research showed that what's described as "Louisiana" is not genetically different from the rest of the species. He also shows that the arborescence of S. minor is variable across the range and seems to be based on the environmental factors.

Definitely not a S. palmetto. The costa is not nearly prominent enough for it to be a S. palmetto. Not even prominent enough to be a S. x brazoriensis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevethegator

Welcome to the forum Bernd!

This is a Sabal minor. The leaf morphology is that of a S. minor. I guess the confusing part is the upright growth with the beginning of a trunk there. It resembles what's known in cultivation as S. minor "Louisiana". However, S. Zona's research showed that what's described as "Louisiana" is not genetically different from the rest of the species. He also shows that the arborescence of S. minor is variable across the range and seems to be based on the environmental factors.

Definitely not a S. palmetto. The costa is not nearly prominent enough for it to be a S. palmetto. Not even prominent enough to be a S. x brazoriensis.

I agree, my first thought was S. "Louisiana" as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Turtile

This is 100% not Sabal minor / louisiana / brazoriensis. Look at the mid-rib. It runs right through the leaf. The trunk also should begin sideways on all of these plants which it is not.

It looks like a more tropical Sabal such as Sabal bermudana.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

Petioles are way too thin for it to be any of the massive Sabals, including S. bermudana. Also the S. bermudanas I've seen already had their leaves recurving by the time they start to trunk. Also S. bermudana would usually have a variegated patch around the hastula.

Mid-rib does run through most of the rib, but weakly, consistent of S. minor.

Below is the Sabal minor "Louisiana" growing at Mercer Arboretum in Houston. Notice a very similar mid-rid anatomy.

IMG_0479.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stevetoad

Also S. bermudana would usually have a variegated patch around the hastula.

I noticed this on my big sabal yesterday for the first time. Is that a characteristic of only s. bermudana or do other big sabals get this too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

Also S. bermudana would usually have a variegated patch around the hastula.

I noticed this on my big sabal yesterday for the first time. Is that a characteristic of only s. bermudana or do other big sabals get this too?

Steve, most Sabals do to some extent. The only two species I don't remember seeing it on ever are S. minor and S. mauritiiformis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sonoranfans

Never saw a sabal palmetto with that much blue in it, and Ive seen alot of sabal palmettos. This does look like minor/lousiana in color at least. The yellowing around the hastula was very pronounced in my sabal bermudana I had in AZ. My domingensis, blackburniana, causiarum, minor, mauritiformis dont show this to an appreciable extent, at least compared with my bermudana. Environmental factors can really change a sabals appearance, and this one probably spent some extended time in a greenhouse in cool weather I expect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habanero

Dear all,

thank's a lot for your fast replys and help. I look for better pictures this week, I take the winter-protection away. Is it possible that is a hybrid from Sabal m."Louisiana"x bermudana? You need other details from the Sabal xy ?


regards,

Bernd

P.s.: I hope I can sleep well, to much new info ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GREENHAND

Here are some very old sabal minor palms growing at Avery island. They grow wild all over the area you can see the differance but you can make your on judgment. they are super slow growing.post-59-0-49666900-1367338954_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-03353200-1367338990_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-55957600-1367339025_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-80348700-1367339072_thumb.jpgpost-59-0-22851700-1367339142_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Palmə häl′ik

Those look like landscaped palms pictured there on Avery Island photos.... Looks like part of a "revitalization" project or sumthin.... Whack one, plant two...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buffy

If its a S. minor, it's fruiting size. Let's see if it sends an inflorescence way above the leaves. That'll make identification easier. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

If its a S. minor, it's fruiting size. Let's see if it sends an inflorescence way above the leaves. That'll make identification easier. :)

Excellent point!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phoenikakias

Petioles are way too thin for it to be any of the massive Sabals, including S. bermudana. Also the S. bermudanas I've seen already had their leaves recurving by the time they start to trunk. Also S. bermudana would usually have a variegated patch around the hastula.

Mid-rib does run through most of the rib, but weakly, consistent of S. minor.

Below is the Sabal minor "Louisiana" growing at Mercer Arboretum in Houston. Notice a very similar mid-rid anatomy.

IMG_0479.jpg

Also S. bermudana would usually have a variegated patch around the hastula.

I noticed this on my big sabal yesterday for the first time. Is that a characteristic of only s. bermudana or do other big sabals get this too?

Here are some pics of my bermudana. I have noticed that with age new leaves become more pronouncedly arching or costa palmate.

post-6141-0-50402900-1370931824_thumb.jp

post-6141-0-76557300-1370931872_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • DreaminAboutPalms
      By DreaminAboutPalms
      I germinated a few sabal Bermuda seeds about a month ago and they are working on first strap leaf, I have a 3rd that's a little bit farther behind.
      I am absolutely amazed by the roots on these things though. I had them in 6 inch pots to start, and then before anything even poked above surface of soil each pot had a long root extending 3 inches out the bottom of the pot.  I repotted them into 0.7 gallon pots about a week ago and ALREADY there are two roots coming out bottom on both sides in each pot. 
      Curious if anyone else is growing seedlings of these and what your experiences have been. Curious on what to expect 


    • DreaminAboutPalms
      By DreaminAboutPalms
      Starting this thread for all the random palms I see around the Dallas area on a daily basis
    • DreaminAboutPalms
      By DreaminAboutPalms
      Dug this up from a parking lot exactly a year ago. It was slow for awhile but this 4th leaf wasn’t even visible 2 weeks ago so making progress. The old pic was from last August. The video below was across the parking lot from where I dug this up. So i actually have zero clue which one this is. This is in North Austin off braker and i35 on east side. There are like a hundred sabal volunteers growing around the property



      IMG_9469.MOV
    • teddytn
      By teddytn
      Dwarf sabal minor, 19” tall. There’s 4 flower stalks at various stages of development Sabal minor mccurtain, first time flowering. I can stand on the upper bed to the left and the flower stalk is over my head, it’s easily 8’ tall now. 2 flower stalks Sabal Birmingham 3rd year flowering, 3 flower stalks, same every year so far always 3
    • DreaminAboutPalms
      By DreaminAboutPalms
      I germinated a pair of Sabal Bermudana seeds about one month ago (first pic is from May 1) and sowed then after and have had them covered to keep moisture in and on a heat mat. Still haven’t seen anything pop up above surface of soil yet and I’m wondering if they might be dead or are just really slow 


×
×
  • Create New...