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Padraic

I would not write off Washingtonia (California and Mexican) since they are trouble free and native here. Once established, almost no water is needed. If you have only limited palm to plant, you may not use them. 

Bismarkia is great and more expensive, but you can get it rom Home Depot. It is easy to grow. Roystonea Regia will looks less healthy in the peak of hot summer. 

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Jeff P

 

21 minutes ago, Padraic said:

I would not write off Washingtonia (California and Mexican) since they are trouble free and native here. Once established, almost no water is needed. If you have only limited palm to plant, you may not use them. 

Bismarkia is great and more expensive, but you can get it rom Home Depot. It is easy to grow. Roystonea Regia will looks less healthy in the peak of hot summer. 

I got a message about how Roystonea Borinquena may be a better option for the elements here. Does anybody have experience with how those hold up? I probably only have 2-3 spots max that I'm looking to plant. I don't particularly have anything against the fans, I just see them everywhere else and was looking for something more unique for my yard if I could find something that met what I was looking for from a height and relatively quick growth standpoint. 

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Padraic
6 hours ago, Jeff P said:

 

I got a message about how Roystonea Borinquena may be a better option for the elements here. Does anybody have experience with how those hold up? I probably only have 2-3 spots max that I'm looking to plant. I don't particularly have anything against the fans, I just see them everywhere else and was looking for something more unique for my yard if I could find something that met what I was looking for from a height and relatively quick growth standpoint. 

Here is a thread of Roystonea in Mesa AZ. You may pick up the different between your area and his.

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96720

I have had no luck with any royal other than regia they say borinquena will take cold weather better but that has not been my experience I planted them side by side and when we had a bad frost the only ones that survived were the regia I find them loving heat. I just snapped those pictures of 5 of my royals the first photo has 3 a small one in the front a larger one right behind it they are planted as a double which isn’t a great idea for royals and then the big one. Then the great thing I went out this morning and a frond was on the ground no need to trim. The picture I posted earlier was taken towards the end of last summer.

B19F42D6-4FEB-41A6-85F1-801102DAF5C3.jpeg

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Edited by 96720
Correct photo
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96720

I texted Shamus and got no response. If you are interested in a royal I might sell one but the largest one I have is 5 gal. Shamus had some big ones but he doesn’t seem to communicate very well.

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wase471111

actually a friend of mine went there today and saw some 15 gal ones there, so thanks for the info and the offer! ;)

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wase471111

just curious, if anyone has seen any King Palms (Archontophoenix alexandrae) for sale in the phoenix area?

Seems like there are lots of places in San Diego with them, and they are supposed to be ok to grow here in phoenix...

Thanks!

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96720

I don’t think it’s possible I have had no luck even trying to grow them in the greenhouse!

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wase471111

is it because of the heat, the lack of moisture, or something else?  It looks like they can take the heat/sun, and, it looks like they do ok with an average amount of water..

just curious as to why they might be so difficult..

 

thanks

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96720

Our sun is so intense that a lot of plants can’t take the sun even if they could take the heat. I have tried Archontophoenix teracarpa from jungle music in deep shade and it did survive a couple of years but it was in an out of the way area so didn’t get a lot of attention, I will probably try another one one of these days I tell my wife my job is to kill plants after 3-4 times I give up!!!

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wase471111

so true; I have a nice eastern exposure location that I would put it in, that I have a few other palms doing very well in now.

I guess I have to find someplace in phoenix first that even sells them now..

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Padraic
2 hours ago, wase471111 said:

just curious, if anyone has seen any King Palms (Archontophoenix alexandrae) for sale in the phoenix area?

Seems like there are lots of places in San Diego with them, and they are supposed to be ok to grow here in phoenix...

Thanks!

San Diego climate is very different than ours. I attend SoCal palm society and brought potted palm from their auction. Most of them don't do well in Yuma (my area). Except the potted Royal with a lot of water and shade. King Palm looks like Royal. I haven't seem those in our desert. 

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aztropic

I have a king palm planted in the ground in Mesa,Arizona for 15 years now. It is now about 8ft tall overall,but it's days are numbered as it is outgrowing it's protected growing area,starting to enter full sun territory.It is growing under,and in the canopy of an orange tree,and any new frond that escapes the orange tree is burned off on the parts exposed to full sun.Yes,it is possible to grow them in a shaded area in Phoenix (a potted specimen under a covered patio is ideal) but one in the ground will have a limited lifespan due to the intensity of our sun.I have a few I grew from seed in 3/5 gallon pots if you'd like to give it a try.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

 

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wase471111
33 minutes ago, aztropic said:

I have a king palm planted in the ground in Mesa,Arizona for 15 years now. It is now about 8ft tall overall,but it's days are numbered as it is outgrowing it's protected growing area,starting to enter full sun territory.It is growing under,and in the canopy of an orange tree,and any new frond that escapes the orange tree is burned off on the parts exposed to full sun.Yes,it is possible to grow them in a shaded area in Phoenix (a potted specimen under a covered patio is ideal) but one in the ground will have a limited lifespan due to the intensity of our sun.I have a few I grew from seed in 3/5 gallon pots if you'd like to give it a try.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizonaon 

thanks for the information!

It sounds like this is a plant that cant cut it out here, once its on its own"...Do you think it was the last summers heat from hell that is so dangerous, or, is it like that every year, where only certain trees have any chance of long term survival?

My eastern exposure spot doesnt have any "canopies" that I can plant this guy under, just the fact that it doesnt get sun all day, but it sounds like it doesnt matter with this particular tree..

Oh well, I'm glad there are knowledgeable and friendly folks like you to steer us N00Bs in the right direction! :greenthumb:
 

 

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aztropic

I have several growing outdoors in pots in a fair amount of shade.Last summers extreme heat doesn't seem to have had any effect on them. Direct exposure to our summer sun will torch them though. They can be grown here indoors,outdoors in deep shade,or under a covered patio in a pot.Basically,same conditions that all the big box store majesty palms would require to survive here if you ever considered trying those.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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wase471111
4 minutes ago, aztropic said:

I have several growing outdoors in pots in a fair amount of shade.Last summers extreme heat doesn't seem to have had any effect on them. Direct exposure to our summer sun will torch them though. They can be grown here indoors,outdoors in deep shade,or under a covered patio in a pot.Basically,same conditions that all the big box store majesty palms would require to survive here if you ever considered trying those.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

yeah, there are a few that, if I had a larger covered patio, I would definately bring into the fold; bottle palm is another one that is like that for me..

But, I just dont have the covered patio  space for that stuff, and, I am in the open desert, so it would take me some time to create the proper shading/canopy setup to allow for those trees to grow safely..

Right now, all my palms are the type that have a history of survival out here, but I wanted to add a few that were not as prevalent all over the valley..

Fortunately, I have really good luck keeping things alive, and raised quite a few  desert plants/cacti when I lived in the suburbs of chicago the last 20 years!

So tts exciting to finally live somewhere where its relatively easy to grow some things; its just challenging to grow many others!

 

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aztropic

For something different that WILL survive our conditions,start looking into palms native to Caribbean islands. Alkaline soils and high temps on the islands are growing conditions similar to ours.

I've had great luck with many Coccothrinax,Copernicia,Pseudo phoenix,Serenoa,Sabal,and Thrinax species.^_^

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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wase471111
1 hour ago, aztropic said:

For something different that WILL survive our conditions,start looking into palms native to Caribbean islands. Alkaline soils and high temps on the islands are growing conditions similar to ours.

I've had great luck with many Coccothrinax,Copernicia,Pseudo phoenix,Serenoa,Sabal,and Thrinax species.^_^

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

So, where is a good place in arizona to find some of these guys, like the  Pseudo Phoenix? I've seen Sabals a couple times before locally, but none lately.

Whitfill?  Pacific Palms? Shamus? or are there other places carrying some different stuff?

thank you very much for all the help you have given to me and many other of the newer folks!

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xoRudy
3 hours ago, wase471111 said:

So, where is a good place in arizona to find some of these guys, like the  Pseudo Phoenix? I've seen Sabals a couple times before locally, but none lately.

Whitfill?  Pacific Palms? Shamus? or are there other places carrying some different stuff?

thank you very much for all the help you have given to me and many other of the newer folks!

I’ve found luck finding the Caribbean palms in Arizona from local growers like @aztropic. I’ve also had to drive to San Diego to pick up some Cocothrinax, Thrinax, and Copernicia species from growers out there. For the Pseudophoenix species, I had to order mine online from Florida. Bought two about 10 months ago, and they seem to be doing great down here so far.

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xoRudy

@wase471111 In my experiences, Braheas do well out here too. I have a Brahea Brandegeei, Super Silver, Armata, and Clara out here. Here’s a photo of my Brandegeei.

1BD6A7E4-6BE8-426E-A8BA-3374D8EA59B5.jpeg

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xoRudy

@wase471111 Also if your looking for a Pseudophoenix, you could order them from the same company in Florida that I ordered mine from. There’s 7 left in stock, prices have gone up a bit and there’s still baby palms but they come in the mail looking good. Here’s a photo of mine that I got 10 months ago, very slow growers

https://www.amazon.com/Lets-Grow-Florida-Pseudophoenix-sargentii/dp/B089QD6QYM/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=buccaneer%2Bpalm%2Btree&qid=1619757960&sr=8-3&th=1&psc=1
 

let’s grow Florida on Amazon.

B326A922-FCF1-4B7E-A0C4-65F4660E0481.jpeg

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aztropic

Pseudophoenix is a great species choice for our desert conditions.They are tough palms that can survive here with minimal care.Be aware that they are extremely slow growing though,until a trunk is formed.Buy the biggest plant you can afford, to get a head start with these.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20210225_110723911.jpg

IMG_20200215_105203272.jpg

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wase471111
2 hours ago, aztropic said:

Pseudophoenix is a great species choice for our desert conditions.They are tough palms that can survive here with minimal care.Be aware that they are extremely slow growing though,until a trunk is formed.Buy the biggest plant you can afford, to get a head start with these.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20210225_110723911.jpg

IMG_20200215_105203272.jpg

great pix!

anyone in arizona who might sell some decent sized specimens of these?  these would make a great addition to my collection!

thank you

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aztropic

I sold about 50 of these at 5 gallon size years ago,but am not growing anymore from seed at this time as they are so slow from seed. As has been previously mentioned,you will probably have to search outside of Arizona to find one.Jungle music may have some,and there are plenty of Florida growers that carry Pseudophoenix.Ebay is another source. Because of the slow growth rate of this species,larger specimens can be quite expensive. Most people out here start with a 3/5 gallon mail order plant,and put in the time to get their specimens.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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wase471111

thanks, my problem is that old age is limiting the amount of years I think I can count on being able to enjoy this hobby, so waiting 5-10 years for a nice adult to start to form is a challenge for me!

I'll check the places you suggested, and thanks again!

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wase471111

quick question; how do Kentia Palms  do planted out side here?

 

thanks!

 

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aztropic

Can't be done...WAY to hot and dry. This species probably would not even survive under a covered patio. It's an indoor only palm for Arizona.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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wase471111
2 hours ago, aztropic said:

Can't be done...WAY to hot and dry. This species probably would not even survive under a covered patio. It's an indoor only palm for Arizona.

E4CEB836-8CCD-4EB8-BFB5-807E6473F193_1_105_c.jpeg.d0be1ef4e613adda663418c5a63f481f.jpeg

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

thanks for the great and super fast reply!

not palm related, but this guy was in the tree next door today, scoping my 25 lb cock a poo..

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96720

New frond opening on my Chambyronia not as red as cooler climates 

D1A11C92-F92D-4339-84BE-BB8B3B2F079B.jpeg

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wase471111

quick question; it may not just apply to phoenix, but because of the unique ground cover used in Phoenix, when you plant a palm here, should you have rocks covering up the entire base of the tree, or, should you leave a few inch "border" of dirt/sand/dust/whatever happens to be in your back yard?

I think its probably smarter to leave a couple inches open, so no moisture gets trapped under the rocks/tree base, but, considering how hot and dry it is out here for 6 months, it might make sense to try and trap that moisture against the base of the tree..

What's the best practice for that in Phoenix?

thanks

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Phoenikakias
On 4/30/2021 at 2:05 PM, aztropic said:

Pseudophoenix is a great species choice for our desert conditions.They are tough palms that can survive here with minimal care.Be aware that they are extremely slow growing though,until a trunk is formed.Buy the biggest plant you can afford, to get a head start with these.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20210225_110723911.jpg

IMG_20200215_105203272.jpg

How about substrate and water needs? Is super fast draining soil like lava or coral or pebbles necessary? Or could be used materials that withhold some moisture like pumice, leca, zeolite or pine bark?

Edited by Phoenikakias

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aztropic

They are a drought tolerant species,and a fast draining soil is appreciated when younger. (in a pot) Once you put them in the ground,you don't have much control over soil.They do seem to adapt, and sargentii is the easiest of the species to grow.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

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96720

I’ve had no luck with this palm I’ve killed 2 of them so far and they are so hard to find and so slow growing 

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aztropic
5 hours ago, 96720 said:

I’ve had no luck with this palm I’ve killed 2 of them so far and they are so hard to find and so slow growing 

I have 19 of them left planted in the ground of all different sizes. (after recently selling a few out of my landscape) Hard to find locally,and slow growers to be sure,but they definitely do well here. Probably the toughest crownshafted palm for our area. Maybe third try will be the one? 

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

16206685791688365961137896872625.jpg

16206686485371206085630932001420.jpg

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aztropic
14 hours ago, wase471111 said:

quick question; it may not just apply to phoenix, but because of the unique ground cover used in Phoenix, when you plant a palm here, should you have rocks covering up the entire base of the tree, or, should you leave a few inch "border" of dirt/sand/dust/whatever happens to be in your back yard?

I think its probably smarter to leave a couple inches open, so no moisture gets trapped under the rocks/tree base, but, considering how hot and dry it is out here for 6 months, it might make sense to try and trap that moisture against the base of the tree..

What's the best practice for that in Phoenix?

thanks

No 'border' is necessary,but would try to keep from burying trunk unless it is producing new roots above the soil line.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

1620670250860526024932329643644.jpg

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wase471111
2 minutes ago, aztropic said:

No 'border' is necessary,but would try to keep from burying trunk unless it is producing new roots above the soil line.

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

1620670250860526024932329643644.jpg

thanks man, thats what I thought...the only reason I was wondering, is that I have my drip heads buried about 1/2 inch below the rocks, and, I noticed yesterday how wet the area under those rocks were real wet, so I quickly made a little "border" around most of my trees, not sure if being so wet under the rocks was bad for them..

 

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96720

I’ll stick with palms that I don’t have problems with I’m to old to try to get a palm that slow to grow I would be dead before it had much trunk just give me a royal they are fast and beautiful!!

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aztropic

My royal poincianas are starting to get some color!

This is one of those palm companion tropicals that grows so fast,you can almost HEAR it growing!:lol:

 

aztropic 

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20210522_131728880.jpg

IMG_20210522_131712163.jpg

Edited by aztropic
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wase471111

gorgeous flowers!

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96720

Beautiful one of my favorites 

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