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aztropic

I don't have alot of space to grow the potentially rather large trees I'm growing.Right now,like a big city,I have to grow vertically.When they gain some hight,I will let them spread out - right now,they would be 3 feet into the roadway which is unacceptable.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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DesertCoconut
3 minutes ago, aztropic said:

I don't have alot of space to grow the potentially rather large trees I'm growing.Right now,like a big city,I have to grow vertically.When they gain some hight,I will let them spread out - right now,they would be 3 feet into the roadway which is unacceptable.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

OK. I thought it might have been for some health benefit. It makes perfect sense and a much better alternative to hacking off leaves that get in your way like most people would. I'll remember this tip when mine start to get in the way of mowing the lawn!

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aztropic
19 hours ago, DesertCoconut said:

 I just planted a glabrescens in a nice sunny spot. It grew right through our harsh winter without any damage. I had a couple ekmanii hybrid seedlings that didn't survive the winter. I collected those seeds from a trip to Florida last summer. I'm just fascinated by the whole genus. I would really like to find a nice hospita. 

Copernicia glabrescens is basically a smaller version of hospita,except it clumps.See pic of mine.I agree it's a bullit proof palm for our area and I've never had any damage on mine either.

Copernicia ekmanii,like most of the other species he is credited for discovering,do not do well in Arizona.Main problem seems to be too cold over the winter.I do have several Pseudophoenix ekmanii surviving,but not thriving,and extremely slow.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

155412931165165915551260151179.jpg

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aztropic

Pseudophoenix ekmanii...This one is going on 18 years old and is only 2 feet tall. It only completes 1 new frond every 2 years.

In that amount of time,I've already stepped on it a couple times and hit it with the weed wacker for good measure.

Forgetaboutit!!!

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Garcia3

Couple of questions for you @aztropic, First, does your C. Macroglossa produce viable seed? Is it self pollinating?  Second, what is your experience with Dypsis in the valley besides D. Decaryi?  I ask because I'd like to know if anyone has tried growing a tri-bear hybrid.  I'm hoping Dypsis isn't a lost cause in the valley.  

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aztropic

Copernicia macroglossa has not flowered yet although I expect it will soon.

When I first started growing palms,Dypsis had the looks I wanted.Bought a dozen different species that Jungle Music nursery suggested,but none survived more than 2 years.I've retried some of the stronger ones,still to no long term avail.Other than the triangle,it's just too hot and dry here over the summer for their liking...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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AZPalms

I agree on the Dypsis. My Decaryi seems to love the half day eastern exposure, already opened up a spear this year and was unprotected during our freezes. Looks near perfect. My D. lutescens looks a bit beat up from winter and is planted in my shadiest part of the yard, about 3 hours of morning sun. It was cheap and m I don’t have long term hope for it here between the summer heat and winter chill. But who knows. 

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DesertCoconut

There is a really nice D. lutescens at the Royal Palms Resort. It has some protection, but it's not completely shaded. I thought I had a photo, but I couldn't find it. I have a small one gallon d. leptocheilos that grew pretty well indoors. I put it out under my shade structure a couple of weeks ago and it already looks a bit burned. I think I'll move it to my full shade front porch and see if it does better there.

I'm also curious about the decaryi x leptocheilos hybrids. If we could get the adaptability of the triangle crossed with the looks of the teddy bear, that would be an amazing addition to our arid gardens.

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Garcia3

Is anyone growing any of the tropical type bromeliads (Aechmea, Neoregelia, etc...) in the phoenix area? If so are they outside year round?  I currently have some terrestrial 'desert' bromeliads (Puya, Hechtia, Dyckia, etc..) in ground and they are doing quite well, but wondered if anyone has had some luck with any of the new tropical cultivars/hybrid bromeliads. Obviously micro climate, sun exposure, and cold are limitations but I just wondered if anyone has had any particular success in our area?  

 

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AZPalms

After a cold winter, Royals are in beast mode. Also, should I be worried about the small cracks? I thinks it’s liking the extra water and food this time of year. 

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Silas_Sancona
17 minutes ago, Garcia3 said:

Is anyone growing any of the tropical type bromeliads (Aechmea, Neoregelia, etc...) in the phoenix area? If so are they outside year round?  I currently have some terrestrial 'desert' bromeliads (Puya, Hechtia, Dyckia, etc..) in ground and they are doing quite well, but wondered if anyone has had some luck with any of the new tropical cultivars/hybrid bromeliads. Obviously micro climate, sun exposure, and cold are limitations but I just wondered if anyone has had any particular success in our area?  

 

If what i experienced within the first 3 months after the move here is any indication, Give any you try shade.. All day shade, pref. a spot that stays moist if possible. Had several Neos, 15 sp of Tillandsia, and a few others. Most fried under the patio ( no direct sun where placed at the time ) by August of that year.. The few that barely survived were gone by June of 2017. 

That said, if this yard had several large trees providing dense canopy, i might try some of the tougher Aechmea, Neo. and/or Billbergia sp. /cultivars. Placing near a pond, if in a yard, might help also.

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Sandy Loam

I'm sure that this question has already been covered somewhere on this long thread, but I've probably missed it.  Questions:

1.    Will Washingtonia Robusta survive in greater Phoenix without any irrigation?  If so, will they even thrive and grow tall?

2.    Same question for Canary Island Date Palms.

3.    Same question for Ficus Nitida.

4.    Same question for Yucca Guatemalayensis, aka.  Yucca Elephantipes.   Will your answer change if it's in a big pot? (i.e. even less moisture)

5.     Same question for bougainvillea.

6.     Same question for phormium tenax, i.e. any of the various coloured hybrids.   (You see these thriving in street medians in deserty San Diego and Los Angeles where they don't receive any irrigation at all, so why not in the greater Phoenix area?)  

7.      Same question for Aloe Hercules, or any other tree aloe that is cold-hardy enough to withstand greater Phoenix out as far as chillier spots like Maricopa, San Tan Valley and Casa Grande. 

8.     If you've answered "no" to Ficus Nitida, is there ANY type of neighbour-screening hedge/shrub that would survive there without any irrigation and actually grow fifteen feet tall rather quickly?

9.     If you've answered "no" to CIDP & Washingtonia Robusta, is there ANY type of palm that will grow big without any irrigation (fairly fast growing).

10.     What is your secret stunner plant that looks great without any irrigation in the Valley of the Sun, and which isn't dangerous to children (not spikey).   Number 10 can be anything at all -- palms, non-palms, cacti or not, something blooming or not blooming, just whatever you think works great and looks great anywhere in greater Phoenix.       

 

Thanks.   I'm writing this from Florida, so it's hard for me to grasp what grows and does not grow in your challenging Phoenix conditions. 

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Silas_Sancona

Where to start.....

Easy questions first I guess..

Bougainvillea can live on minimal water, doubt the ones growing near local freeways get much water.. but will grow a lot slower. Further outside the "box" you are ( " Box" would =  anywhere inside the 202 loop ( generally East valley locations) or the loop 101 ( generally north and west side of town )  risk of frost damage goes up. They'll normally come back in the spring though, except if you're located way out in the sticks.. ( or Cacti in this case, lol )  My Torch Glows ( thornless, shrub type Bougs. ) have survived on very minimal water for me in the yard. Still in full bloom, 4 months after they'd started. 

Yucca elephantes ( guatemalensis) ( spelling) / any/ all Phormiums.. Forget it, too ho, esp. Phormiums.. and non- draco type Draceana. Will burn up the first summer in the ground, look like ......... If they manage to endure.  In a pot? Not a chance, esp on minimal/ no extra water.

Aloe Hurcules, and what tree type/ ground hugging Aloes that can tolerate our heat have to have shade, otherwise.. like the one I had out front, they burn.. Trunk can ( will, mine did ) burn if exposed to all day full sun. Re-rooting the top atm.  Like Bougs., the further outside of town you are, more risk for frost damage. 

Decent substitute for Ficus nitida that will grow ( allthough A bit slower ) w/ out much water,  Hopseed.. they will produce tons of seed though.  Green, all year.. can reach 12-15 or so ft in height in time.  Had one pop up out front and haven't touched it ( yet ) Its only about a foot tall but has managed to survive on very little water.  With more, they grow at a pretty good pace.  There are other substitutes I've listed before as well. 

As far as the palms in question, yea, they might survive on minimal water/ no extra water ...once established... Might not look all that great though. Most of the " wild"  washingtonia r's  you see around town pop up/ continue to grow where they get some water.  Don't think I've seen any Phoenix sp. though I occasionally get seedlings of a nearby CIDP under my Mesquite where water collects when it rains. They usually die off if I don't water. 

Hard to say what looks great without any extra water.. Was very stingy w/ the hose out  front this summer and even some of the cacti planted out there were looking quite thirsty at times.  Plumeria would likely be long gone had I not watered occasionally.  A native Cassia I seeded out there did much better, on very little water,  than I'd assumed it would, even the somewhat smaller plants in a really dry part of the yard did well.  Biggest specimen hasn't stopped flowering since .. March?.  Rush Milkweed ( another native) also shrugged off very little water this year.  If Monsoon season is decent, you rarely have to add any extra water. 

That said, with a little fore thought, you can create swales where runoff from your roof / driveway/ the street can collect.  I did this when I  landscaped the front yard here. My mistake was planting stuff that wants more water up on the gravel bars I created. Should have planted such things where the water collects.  Ideally,  a yard with lots of trees would be perfect.. less stress on anything planted, less evaporation ( moisture stays in the soil a touch longer ).  

Interesting fact.. becasue native Mesquites can push roots 60- 100ft + deep, they can actually pull water up from below during the summer months. That extra soil moisture can help anything growing near them get through the driest part of the year. 

 

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Tom in Tucson

Bougainvillea is tough, but can suffer from frost damage. It usually can grow new stems so fast that by the time it is fall it looks fine again.

The native trees Parkinsonia microphylla, Olneya tesota and Bursera microphylla can live without supplemental water. The Bursera is somewhat tender. Fouquieria splendens and Larrea tridentata are tough as nails.

When it comes to palms, my picks for drought tolerance would be the following genera:

Medemia

Nannorrhops

Brahea

Chamaerops

Pseudophoenix (maybe)

Of coarse nearly all native cacti should be fine, and some other succulents like Agave deserti and it's near relatives (Agave moranii, etc.).

Hi 84˚, Lo 51˚

Edited by Tom in Tucson
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wrigjef

Happy New Year!

I have always wanted to visit the Arizona State Capitol to see the Roystonea Regia (Royal Palm) in person as l have never seen it.   I was surprised to see a variety of Palms in the immediate area around the Royal I rarely see in Phoenix.  I can name a few but need help identifying some of them.  Here are some pics I took yesterday   It was a cloudy 60 degree day in Phoenix  

Correct me if I’m wrong, I see in order 

Roystonea Regia

Sabal Mexicana?  Or even Florida Sabel Palms?

Dypsis Decaryl (Triangle Palm).

Livistonia Chinensis (Chinese Fan Palm?)

another Triangle 

The last 3 Palms I cannot identify but really cool.  
 

The last pic is the full view of the Royal. I estimate it’s about 40 feet tall.  

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Edited by wrigjef
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Tom in Tucson

The last 3 images appear to contain a Rhapis sp., an Arenga sp. and some Phoenix hybrids.

Happy new year

Hi 64˚, Lo 44˚

Edited by Tom in Tucson
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aztropic

Unfortunately,almost everything there is kept WAY overtrimmed.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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wrigjef
On 12/31/2019 at 8:43 PM, Tom in Tucson said:

The last 3 images appear to contain a Rhapis sp., an Arenga sp. and some Phoenix hybrids.

Happy new year

Hi 64˚, Lo 44˚

Thanks for the info.  Do you know if Arenga typically do well here?  Looks like one of those Palms that would fry in our sun.  These were in constant shade from what I can tell. 

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wrigjef
On 1/1/2020 at 9:09 AM, aztropic said:

Unfortunately,almost everything there is kept WAY overtrimmed.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

I agree and it’s unfortunate.  I think landscapers over trim so they don’t have to do it as often at the expense of the tree. 
 

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aztropic
22 hours ago, wrigjef said:

Thanks for the info.  Do you know if Arenga typically do well here?  Looks like one of those Palms that would fry in our sun.  These were in constant shade from what I can tell. 

Yes,they do well with some shade in the Phoenix area but would burn up in full sun.I have 2 clumps planted on the north side of the house and they do get some burn for the 2 weeks over the summer that they get direct sun.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Sandy Loam

Is that an Everglades Palm on the far left? 

 

 Is that a huge Royal Poinciana tree in the background?  (I assume not likely in Arizona?) 

 

Apart from the ARENGLA ENGLERI, will the others survive the Phoenix sun without shade?  My own rhapis excelsa are shade-lovers here in Florida.  

 

How about the Livistona Chinensis? 

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Silas_Sancona
29 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

 

 Is that a huge Royal Poinciana tree in the background?  (I assume not likely in Arizona?) 

 

Apart from the ARENGLA ENGLERI, will the others survive the Phoenix sun without shade?  My own rhapis excelsa are shade-lovers here in Florida. 

Only Rhapis excelsa i've seen anywhere in the valley are in shade.. At least mid day-afternoon shade, esp. during summer.  Can't imagine they'd tolerate full sun here.  Not something i'd gamble with, imo.

Think this is D. regia, and has been discussed in other on line garden groups, if not here on the forum before.  While the two in my neighborhood are smaller ( but steadily gaining height ) Did stumble upon a far larger specimen near a church in South Phoenix while checking out a nursery out there.  There are also at least two not big.. but not small specimens up in Scottsdale, near Civic Center Park. Have discussed the bigger one there (by the Police station entrance ) here in the past. I personally like the size of the specimen by the police station. Makes it easy to maintain.  Hear about other up and coming Royal Poinciana planted around the valley fairly frequently also.

There is at least one nursery in town that has sold chunky 25-30Gal sized specimens in the past( would bet he brought them in from Florida ). Another nursery has been selling specimens also, possibly raised from seed, but not certain.. inc. the yellow-orange flowered var. ..Which are currently sold out btw.  No clue how they're doing here.  Not a difficult tree here if you get it past the first couple winters.

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wrigjef
1 hour ago, Sandy Loam said:

Is that an Everglades Palm on the far left? 

 

 Is that a huge Royal Poinciana tree in the background?  (I assume not likely in Arizona?) 

 

Apart from the ARENGLA ENGLERI, will the others survive the Phoenix sun without shade?  My own rhapis excelsa are shade-lovers here in Florida.  

 

How about the Livistona Chinensis? 

Livistona Chinesis do just fine in full sun here in Phoenix although not a common palm.  I have seen a few around town and all look great.  
 
I zoomed in on what I think you are referring to as an Everglades Palm.  I think it is one 

F924DF26-AF2B-4EAF-AE0F-A254E4415650.png

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aztropic

Here's my royal poinciana I grew from seed.Not very common in Phoenix but there are a couple dozen around anyway.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

20180519_162027.jpg

20180519_162014.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
On 1/3/2020 at 9:01 AM, aztropic said:

Yes,they do well with some shade in the Phoenix area but would burn up in full sun.I have 2 clumps planted on the north side of the house and they do get some burn for the 2 weeks over the summer that they get direct sun.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

@wrigjef  For reference, here's my pair of sun-tortured seedling A. engleri, started from seed i'd collected at Kopsick back in St. Pete before i left Florida. 

While they've held up, not even keeping them in my shade house would keep them from burning up every summer since i have been here.

Last spring, i decided to bump them, and a pair of larger Coccothrinax seedlings started at the same time,  into 3gals, and place in my "Shade Alley" which is essentially a section of our Patio that sits between the west facing wall of the the house, and my green / shade house, topped w/ shade cloth stretched between the two. Without the cloth, summer sun would bake everything situated there during the worst part of the day.  Even so, i have to tuck some of the seedling things i attempt each year between larger plants to keep what sun shines through from drying them out.. Anyway..

A comparison between how they looked back in May ( Pic. #1), and how they're doing atm( Pic. #2)..  Still a bit burnt, ..perhaps due to using city water.. but finally moving a bit more, and certainly greener, lol.. If i were staying here, would plant these (  ..or a larger specimen.. ) over on the opposite side of the yard, below the monster Mesquite in that part of the yard where it stays shady almost all day/ all year..  Coccothrinax seedlings have responded similarly.. They've had no issues w/ any of the cooler mornings we've had so far this winter either.. No direct sun on them this time of year in this area ( Sun angle is too low atm )..

Back in April, right after re-potting
DSCN5842.JPG.2ab1143c1e05fe4f74b1b870adceaa13.JPG

Currently,  Jan. 2020 Far from perfect, but good enough for now..
275674898_0112201220170.thumb.jpg.89e870a8ab1c44d9ccde7ffa9f18e016.jpg

Edited by Silas_Sancona
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wrigjef
On 1/12/2020 at 12:53 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

@wrigjef  For reference, here's my pair of sun-tortured seedling A. engleri, started from seed i'd collected at Kopsick back in St. Pete before i left Florida. 

While they've held up, not even keeping them in my shade house would keep them from burning up every summer since i have been here.

Last spring, i decided to bump them, and a pair of larger Coccothrinax seedlings started at the same time,  into 3gals, and place in my "Shade Alley" which is essentially a section of our Patio that sits between the west facing wall of the the house, and my green / shade house, topped w/ shade cloth stretched between the two. Without the cloth, summer sun would bake everything situated there during the worst part of the day.  Even so, i have to tuck some of the seedling things i attempt each year between larger plants to keep what sun shines through from drying them out.. Anyway..

A comparison between how they looked back in May ( Pic. #1), and how they're doing atm( Pic. #2)..  Still a bit burnt, ..perhaps due to using city water.. but finally moving a bit more, and certainly greener, lol.. If i were staying here, would plant these (  ..or a larger specimen.. ) over on the opposite side of the yard, below the monster Mesquite in that part of the yard where it stays shady almost all day/ all year..  Coccothrinax seedlings have responded similarly.. They've had no issues w/ any of the cooler mornings we've had so far this winter either.. No direct sun on them this time of year in this area ( Sun angle is too low atm )..

Back in April, right after re-potting
DSCN5842.JPG.2ab1143c1e05fe4f74b1b870adceaa13.JPG

Currently,  Jan. 2020 Far from perfect, but good enough for now..
275674898_0112201220170.thumb.jpg.89e870a8ab1c44d9ccde7ffa9f18e016.jpg

Thanks for sharing. Those appear to be a challenge to grow here and very slow growers 

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wrigjef

I was golfing at McCormick Ranch about 5 or even 7 years ago and I spotted what I thought was a Roystonea Regia way off in the distance in someone’s yard right next to a pond. I made a mental note to check it out further at a later time but didn’t expect it to be this long.  
Just for fun I looked on Zillow and was able to find the palm pretty easily to my surprise.  There is a nice Bismarckia next to it. 
cheers,

Jeff 

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wrigjef

I stopped by the Royal Palms Resort today to see the Dypsis Lutescens in person and was amazed by all the tropicals growing. 
Here are a few pics 

Can anyone identify the last tree?  Not a palm obviously but looks very tropical 

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wrigjef

Here is what looks like a Caryota (Fishtail Palm) and what looks like a small Howea (Kentia Palm). Never seen either in the ground here 

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CB0CC4A6-7FA6-4542-8EBD-F341582A3E2B.jpeg

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Silas_Sancona
42 minutes ago, wrigjef said:

I stopped by the Royal Palms Resort today to see the Dypsis Lutescens in person and was amazed by all the tropicals growing. 
Here are a few pics 

Can anyone identify the last tree?  Not a palm obviously but looks very tropical 

747E7A73-3223-40CE-8AC7-2B74BDC4F72E.jpeg

CBEEA0A4-AACD-48E0-9344-E86BEE71BEC5.jpeg

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436C1DED-DFCB-4E1A-866F-2009AD175C9D.jpeg

Variegated tree looks like a Ficus, imo.. Nice specimen though.

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Meangreen94z

I see there’s lots of interest in the Phoenix area as far as this thread, but not as much in Tucson? I have seen a few Tucson based members on here though.. Tucson appears to be more into natives and water conservation? Anyone pushing tropical/exotic palms in that region and know what will be successful? Tucson is 9B but sees occasional dips into the teens so I’m guessing success is limited?

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aztropic

Tucson is a little cooler.When you deal with winter freezes,just a couple degrees makes all the difference in the world.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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sonoranfans

In the center of the phoenix heat island its 10a, many 10a palms have been grown there.  As you move out it gets cooler due to lack of heat island effect.  North east towards mesa and scottsdale its warmer than southeast Gilbert, chandler and south which are 9a.  Tuscon is 1300' elevation higher than phoenix area, naturally colder and a much smaller heat island effect.  Could be 3-5 degrees colder in a radiational event.   Id say Tuscon is probably a cold 9a or warm 8b.

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Silas_Sancona
3 minutes ago, sonoranfans said:

In the center of the phoenix heat island its 10a, many 10a palms have been grown there.  As you move out it gets cooler due to lack of heat island effect.  North east towards mesa and scottsdale its warmer than southeast Gilbert, chandler and south which are 9a.  Tuscon is 1300' elevation higher than phoenix area, naturally colder and a much smaller heat island effect.  Could be 3-5 degrees colder in a radiational event.   Id say Tuscon is probably a cold 9a or warm 8b.

Chandler 9a??  Maybe out toward Chandler heights ( less developed ( for now ), snuggled up to the San Tan Mountains ), not too much development ( for now, rapidly changing...)  east toward Queen Creek/ San Tan Valley .. but not where i'm located ( By the hospital ) This part of town easily borders 9b/10a most years.. A neighbor has had her Tamarind and Cassia fistulas in the ground for about 18 years.. Both would be long gone if we were 9a.

As far as Tucson, have mentioned where the warmer parts of town are suggested a few times before.. Coldest parts of town there are generally located in the river basin areas. Warmest spots would include neighborhoods in the Tucson mountains, just west of the I-10, Casas Adobes area, maybe adjacent areas on the low slopes of the Catalinas, just south of Casas Adobes..
and yes.. WAYY ahead of Phoenix in regards to water conservation / forward thinking landscape practices.. As far as their USDA zone?.. yes, freak cold snaps happen and will continue to do so but will likely be less impactful going forward, most of the time. Not something i'd worry about much. 

By the time the next major update is posted, would expect most of the populated parts of T- Town to be fully 9b soon, with some of the warmest spots flirting w/ 10a.. 9a areas will likely expand quite a bit into many areas currently listed as 8b on the 2012 Plant Maps map south and east of the city. They're warming about as fast as the rest of the state.

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Meangreen94z
42 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Chandler 9a??  Maybe out toward Chandler heights ( less developed ( for now ), snuggled up to the San Tan Mountains ), not too much development ( for now, rapidly changing...)  east toward Queen Creek/ San Tan Valley .. but not where i'm located ( By the hospital ) This part of town easily borders 9b/10a most years.. A neighbor has had her Tamarind and Cassia fistulas in the ground for about 18 years.. Both would be long gone if we were 9a.

As far as Tucson, have mentioned where the warmer parts of town are suggested a few times before.. Coldest parts of town there are generally located in the river basin areas. Warmest spots would include neighborhoods in the Tucson mountains, just west of the I-10, Casas Adobes area, maybe adjacent areas on the low slopes of the Catalinas, just south of Casas Adobes..
and yes.. WAYY ahead of Phoenix in regards to water conservation / forward thinking landscape practices.. As far as their USDA zone?.. yes, freak cold snaps happen and will continue to do so but will likely be less impactful going forward, most of the time. Not something i'd worry about much. 

By the time the next major update is posted, would expect most of the populated parts of T- Town to be fully 9b soon, with some of the warmest spots flirting w/ 10a.. 9a areas will likely expand quite a bit into many areas currently listed as 8b on the 2012 Plant Maps map south and east of the city. They're warming about as fast as the rest of the state.

Thanks, I know I’ve brought up similar discussions before, you’ve been a great help.  Currently slow times , so I figured I’d bring up Tucson again in a different thread to see if anything new was offered . This thread is constantly updated so I figured maybe intermittent members may eventually read and respond. Thanks again.

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Silas_Sancona
32 minutes ago, Meangreen94z said:

Thanks, I know I’ve brought up similar discussions before, you’ve been a great help.  Currently slow times , so I figured I’d bring up Tucson again in a different thread to see if anything new was offered . This thread is constantly updated so I figured maybe intermittent members may eventually read and respond. Thanks again.

No worries.. Agree, never hurts to add further traction to older discussions.. I saw, in another forum, Tucson is on the list of possibilities, after current events subside a bit?

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sonoranfans

the owner of treeland chandler recorded 19F in 2020 when my yard in gilbert hit 21f.  Judging by the burn on washie robustas around town I'd say it may have been 19F and my bizzies(8'-14' overall) were either outright killed(1) or defoliated(3).  His royal survived and does to this day, not sure how he protected it.  Those are fast radiational cold events so yes even a royals with enough size can survive, though totally defoliated.   This talk of zones is old and zones are not reliable when comparing survivability as advective events are longere and kill more palms at a given(zone) temp. My yard in gilbert was similar to chandler in the cold lows and a warm 9a(5 degrees is too much for a zoneIMO).   I lived there 6 years and it hit below 25F 2x, sounds like 9a. I know these things can change and next year the area could experince another c old event.  We are sittin ng herer in florida with only 4 freeze events since 2010, that will not stay the same for sure.  There is a huge advantage in low wind radiational events, the promixity of warm buildings and overhead trees can influence the temp 3-6F warmer than in an advective event.  Casa Grande hit 16F in 2010, 10 years ago.  Not sure the phoenix heat island really grew that much after the banking(real estate) collapse.  Lets see what happens over the next 5-10 years.

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Meangreen94z

Yeah, it’s definitely about extreme lows. You can have a lot of nice plants make it several years and start to achieve a respectable size....and a single night can wipe all that out. I learned that lesson January 2018 locally, but also learned several methods to save plants next time. My guess is when it drops into the teens in Tucson I wouldn’t be dealing with high winds and rain/sleet/ice. So a little easier. And the drop is most likely much briefer. It’s been mild winters since, my zip code hasn’t even seen high 20’s the last 2 years .

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Meangreen94z
4 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

No worries.. Agree, never hurts to add further traction to older discussions.. I saw, in another forum, Tucson is on the list of possibilities, after current events subside a bit?

Yeah, we’re thinking Tucson, Austin, or possibly the Phoenix area. Each has different advantages/disadvantages. We like that Tucson seems the most laid back of the three. 

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Meangreen94z said:

Yeah, we’re thinking Tucson, Austin, or possibly the Phoenix area. Each has different advantages/disadvantages. We like that Tucson seems the most laid back of the three. 

Would agree 100% w/ the last sentence.. Not sure why, but everyone i'd met down there were easy to talk with, especially anyone connected w/ plants/ various other nature/ environment related pursuits. Can go either way up here.. As far as things like sporting events, if you/ your family are fans, Phoenix isn't that far of a drive to attend games. U of AZ basketball is legendary. They're my #2 team each spring ..if # 1 fails miserably... anyway..
 

The other thing to consider, before recent events, there had been countless stories regarding how tough it is to find housing up this way, let alone how fast the cost of purchasing is rising. In some parts of town, getting real close to prices you see in moderately expensive parts of CA and i haven't been impressed w/ some of the newer neighborhoods being built.. Wayy too crowded... Tucson has a bigger advantage atm.. better prices for what you get and will be picking up the pace, -growth-wise- soon, especially w/ a Tesla competitor, and some other big companies ( Including one tied to oil  ) building nearby / up in Casa Grande now and very soon..  Toughest concern is water, but if any place will figure out how to take on that challenge responsibly, Tucson is it.. People there will see that it happens. Air quality down there is better too..

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