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Local Arizona Thread

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AZPalms
6 minutes ago, BillDaCat8 said:

 

Trachycarpus Wagnerianus. Super nice looking. This guy will be near the pool. 

D4238680-0248-4478-87E2-553EA018F2B6.jpeg

I *used* to hate on the Trachys, BUT I planted out a Wagnerianus and have grown to appreciate them much more. Takes more sun than Fortunei for sure, the stiff fronds are awesome for wind. Doesn’t mind wet cold soil, handles drought and heat. Mine has never even yellowed or showed spotting anything! Reminds me of Cocothrinax a bit as well. Gets a thumbs up from me. 

B416CA9A-6F9F-467C-9CBA-104B124AC59D.jpeg

Edited by AZPalms
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BillDaCat8

ACOELORRHAPHE WRIGHTII

Phil’s suggestion.

Likes wet feet. Even swampy. Tolerates dry air. Sounds like a winner here with a dedicated dripper circuit. 

 

 

C87E33FB-58EA-46E5-AAC1-3EF9BFD442D4.jpeg

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BillDaCat8

beahea sp. super silver

E2F99185-5B20-41E4-A318-ECCECF27020B.jpeg

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BillDaCat8

Brahea decumbens

This guy will be cool out in the front yard    

4FC5773B-C9A8-448D-B09F-B6E7CE7A52A1.jpeg

Edited by BillDaCat8
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AZPalms

Bill you’ve been bitten by the bug, you did great with your pickups. I’m going to grab a cold one. Keep going! That Wrightii would be great near a pool. I saw a nice 15g in Ft. Meyers over the weekend for $50. I almost pounced but it was too big for the plane. Maybe I should have gotten it.. want...need one!!

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BillDaCat8

 

Dracaena draco. Not a palm.  I know. Still a cool plant. 

1D86D207-9CBD-43C9-A3C7-549FD14ABBD1.jpeg

1C0C975C-E896-4F7C-AC2B-4548E5A8A867.jpeg

Edited by BillDaCat8

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Padraic
On 2/4/2019 at 6:46 AM, BillDaCat8 said:

Bismarck’s had bottomed out in their 14” long tubes

Hi BillDaCat8, I am new here. Starting to grow palm in Yuma after moving here to retire. After read thru the AZ forum, see you started a year ahead of me.  

I got some Bismarck seeds and try to germinate them. What is your seed soil mixture or general palm soil? What was the advice to plant the Bismarck below grade for the root? I got a 25 gallon Bismarck that needs to go the ground soon. 

Potted palm from the store seems to be sensitive to the sun and wind since I have two California Fan palms almost dying on me and they are in life support by transferring back in the pots for finer environmental control. I don't know how much water should I do in this area. We have fine sand, it doesn't seem to drain fast. I am thinking to add coarse sand or bark to help drainage. 

So many questions and so little time.

Thanks.

Padraic

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Garcia3
4 hours ago, AZPalms said:

This is how it all starts... started with me just buying a few palms for the pool area. Next thing I know it’s bringing palms on planes from trips, joining Palmtalk, buying more palms for different sun exposure areas of the yard, then it’s pushing zones with tropicals, then it’s tropical plants to compliment palms, then it’s getting a divorce over palm addiction lol! Just kidding! 

On this recent trip to a couple of local Florida nurseries, even my wife knew the Latin name and genus of a couple palms. Proud husband.

HAHAHAHAHAHA..... Couldn't agree more. I am currently in the tropical plants phase of this cycle. @BillDaCat8 Very interested in your experience with the JXB Hybrid.  I have a pair myself and although they don't seem as sun hardy as a regular Butia (mine seem to need late  afternoon shade otherwise they burn) they seem to be doing very well, amazing trunk development so far!!  Also @aztropic  any particular reason you mulch the base of your palms with seashells?  It looks cool, but does it also serve a purpose? Did anyone else notice that, Lol

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aztropic
1 hour ago, Garcia3 said:

HAHAHAHAHAHA..... Couldn't agree more. I am currently in the tropical plants phase of this cycle. @BillDaCat8 Also @aztropic  any particular reason you mulch the base of your palms with seashells?  It looks cool, but does it also serve a purpose? Did anyone else notice that, Lol

Just an idea I picked up from visiting Florida and the Bahamas. A lot of people in those areas use seashells as mulch and to line their driveways.Here in Arizona,we generally use rocks. (whatever material is commonly available locally) Seashells in Arizona is something you just don't see so their use creates a feeling that you could be next to the ocean on a tropical island with palm trees everywhere,which is sometimes better than the reality of cacti,115F, and 2% humidity.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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BillDaCat8
11 hours ago, aztropic said:

That's how it all starts! Before you know it,you'll have run out of space and the backyard will have turned into a jungle in the middle of the desert.

Great score on the "vulcano" looks like the real deal so far.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

11 hours ago, AZPalms said:

This is how it all starts... started with me just buying a few palms for the pool area. Next thing I know it’s bringing palms on planes from trips, joining Palmtalk, buying more palms for different sun exposure areas of the yard, then it’s pushing zones with tropicals, then it’s tropical plants to compliment palms, then it’s getting a divorce over palm addiction lol! Just kidding! 

On this recent trip to a couple of local Florida nurseries, even my wife knew the Latin name and genus of a couple palms. Proud husband.

 

11 hours ago, AZPalms said:

Depending on the sun exposure of your patio area, I’d wrap that area with palms and tropical plants. Make a nice shade and privacy barrier. Maybe a couple of banana, some Ti... can I come over and plant haha! 

Yeah, I know.  So much for a “low maintenance” yard.

 Fortunately the wife is onboard. She enjoys visiting the nurseries and talking to the experienced people there.  She even helps me dig! We make quite a good digging team actually.  She and I knocked out my second 24gal Mule in about an hour a couple weekends ago. 

We’ve still got my entire front yard to landscape. And the backyard is an ongoing project as well.  So, I should be able to find homes for all of these guys.  And, yes, probably even more.  

C17C84D5-D7D5-48C1-AF8E-89A3A30C2917.jpeg

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AZPalmguy

Hello Everyone,

Just wanted to say hi. I'm new to the site and pleased to see there is a local AZ thread. I look forward to learning and sharing with the group. 

Best,

Brandon 

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Hillizard
17 hours ago, BillDaCat8 said:

ACOELORRHAPHE WRIGHTII

Phil’s suggestion.

Likes wet feet. Even swampy. Tolerates dry air. Sounds like a winner here with a dedicated dripper circuit. 

 

 

C87E33FB-58EA-46E5-AAC1-3EF9BFD442D4.jpeg

Yes, doesn't seem like you can overwater them. I have found that strong summer sun can burn the leaves, at least where I live, so a canopy of plants that filters light a bit may be useful.  You'll just have to plant and see... ;)

Acoelorrhaphe_wrightii.png

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Silas_Sancona
11 hours ago, aztropic said:

Just an idea I picked up from visiting Florida and the Bahamas. A lot of people in those areas use seashells as mulch and to line their driveways.Here in Arizona,we generally use rocks. (whatever material is commonly available locally) Seashells in Arizona is something you just don't see so their use creates a feeling that you could be next to the ocean on a tropical island with palm trees everywhere,which is sometimes better than the reality of cacti,115F, and 2% humidity.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Scott, I was about to inquire where you had picked these up.. Agree, a very different look vs. the typical gravel/ stone.  Wonder if it helps those palms that appreciate some extra Calcium during the growing season here.. I'd imagine it doesn't hurt.. Too bad none of our local big box stores / other L.S. supply places sells bags of the stuff.

Padraic, AZPalmguy, Welcome to the forum.. 

BillDaCat8, :greenthumb:Nice Haul!!  You will be busy indeed.. And yes, once the madness starts, fo' get about stopping it..    As someone i know in Tucson once told himself   "Have to remember to leave myself enough $ for food, at least for the Dog".

Max, if the other half of a marriage / relationship, who might not consider them self a plant nerd / palm nut,  yet can recite Latin names, or, at least makes the effort to understand us plant geeks ..is def. a keeper, lol..

Edited by Silas_Sancona
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aztropic

Here's my group of Jubaea seedlings - offspring from the blue Jubaea at Mission Bay.

1 appears to have been hybridized as it has grown 3 times as fast as the others.Looks like they're ready for 3 or 5 gallon pots at this point.Arizona grown from seed.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15526968483817632450160427289203.jpg

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AZPalms
5 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Scott, I was about to inquire where you had picked these up.. Agree, a very different look vs. the typical gravel/ stone.  Wonder if it helps those palms that appreciate some extra Calcium during the growing season here.. I'd imagine it doesn't hurt.. Too bad none of our local big box stores / other L.S. supply places sells bags of the stuff.

Padraic, AZPalmguy, Welcome to the forum.. 

BillDaCat8, :greenthumb:Nice Haul!!  You will be busy indeed.. And yes, once the madness starts, fo' get about stopping it..    As someone i know in Tucson once told himself   "Have to remember to leave myself enough $ for food, at least for the Dog".

Max, if the other half of a marriage / relationship, who might not consider them self a plant nerd / palm nut,  yet can recite Latin names, or, at least makes the effort to understand us plant geeks ..is def. a keeper, lol..

Nathan, ageeed! I think I’ll hang onto her! She knows Roystonea is my favorite. She noticed all of the Regias around Florida and said “look at all of the Roystoneas”. I don’t even think she knows the common “Cuban/Florida Royal” name!

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Garcia3
On ‎3‎/‎15‎/‎2019 at 6:47 PM, aztropic said:

Here's my group of Jubaea seedlings - offspring from the blue Jubaea at Mission Bay.

1 appears to have been hybridized as it has grown 3 times as fast as the others.Looks like they're ready for 3 or 5 gallon pots at this point.Arizona grown from seed.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15526968483817632450160427289203.jpg

Amazing!! and with those Hybrids in the mix, it is even more interesting.  Really hope they all make it!  When you collected Jubaea seed did you see any other palms in the area that would have been an obvious candidate for hybridizing?      

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aztropic

No idea on what it could have crossed with - probably queen if I had to guess. Upon closer inspection,there appears to be a second plant growing a little faster than the rest...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

15530317624522883452164513303853.jpg

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aztropic

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Sandy Loam

Sorry, my Arizona-related question is unrelated to the photos above.  Please return to the usual topic of discussion after this interruption, which I apologize for in advance.

Question:  I am looking at homes for sale online in greater Phoenix/Valley of the Sun.  I keep seeing huge, two-storey homes overlooking each other's backyards without any privacy screening.  If those homes were in California, people would have planted a dense screening row of Italian Cypress to prevent the neighbours from peering over into their yard all the time.  Why haven't I seen a single Italian Cypress tree in those photos?  Do they not grow well in the Valley of the Sun?  Are they regarded as a fire hazard?  Do they interfere with the solar rooftops too much by casting shade?  Is Arizona too dry for Italian Cypress?  I thought Italian Cypress enjoyed dry weather, and certainly irrigation should be an option if Phoenix is too dry.

I saw somewhere online that most people in Phoenix use ficus nitida as tall screening hedges instead, but I haven't seen ANY screening hedges so far.  I can't imagine that ficus nitida would grow tall enough anyway.  It would take at least a 25 foot tall hedge (or row of Italian Cypress) to block out the view of your neighbour's two-storey home.  In any case, if I buy a house in Phoenix just to rent it out for the next twenty years, I wouldn't want a hedge that had to be maintained.  I would want a dense row of Italian Cypress instead because they require no trimming ever.

Thoughts?

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AZPalms
15 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Sorry, my Arizona-related question is unrelated to the photos above.  Please return to the usual topic of discussion after this interruption, which I apologize for in advance.

Question:  I am looking at homes for sale online in greater Phoenix/Valley of the Sun.  I keep seeing huge, two-storey homes overlooking each other's backyards without any privacy screening.  If those homes were in California, people would have planted a dense screening row of Italian Cypress to prevent the neighbours from peering over into their yard all the time.  Why haven't I seen a single Italian Cypress tree in those photos?  Do they not grow well in the Valley of the Sun?  Are they regarded as a fire hazard?  Do they interfere with the solar rooftops too much by casting shade?  Is Arizona too dry for Italian Cypress?  I thought Italian Cypress enjoyed dry weather, and certainly irrigation should be an option if Phoenix is too dry.

I saw somewhere online that most people in Phoenix use ficus nitida as tall screening hedges instead, but I haven't seen ANY screening hedges so far.  I can't imagine that ficus nitida would grow tall enough anyway.  It would take at least a 25 foot tall hedge (or row of Italian Cypress) to block out the view of your neighbour's two-storey home.  In any case, if I buy a house in Phoenix just to rent it out for the next twenty years, I wouldn't want a hedge that had to be maintained.  I would want a dense row of Italian Cypress instead because they require no trimming ever.

Thoughts?

It’s because everyone stays inside, too hot. No need for privacy if we’re all hiding in our igloos waiting for the furnace to be turned off. Jk. My neighbor behind me has Cypress as do quite a few in my neighborhood. I think it’s more of an HOA thing than anything else. Also, my home is two story and I can only see my neighbors backyard which is a one story behind our house because of window layout in my home. I don’t know why people don’t have more height/view restricting plants. 

Also, I don’t really mind if people see into my backyard. I get to know my neighbors and visa versa. Doesn’t bother me. 

Not sure if this answers your questions. 

Edit: Tried uploading a photo. Too large. 

Max 

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aztropic

Italian cypress is used here in Arizona but one of the drawbacks is that with the low humidity,spider mites ferociously attack them to the point of death unless you are spraying,or always hoseing them off.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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GottmitAlex
1 hour ago, aztropic said:

Italian cypress is used here in Arizona but one of the drawbacks is that with the low humidity,spider mites ferociously attack them to the point of death unless you are spraying,or always hoseing them off.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Same situation here in Cali 10b

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Merlyn2220
3 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

I would want a dense row of Italian Cypress instead because they require no trimming ever.

I thought about Italian cypress for a fairly fast growing hedge wall, but you'd have to plant a LOT of them to create a solid barrier.  And they have a habit of randomly dying or going super sparse even here in FL with the rain and humidity.  I went for sweet Viburnum for rapid growth, a solid screen, and they'll grow 5 feet a year in height if you let them!  I planted 16" tall ones in April 2018 and they are mostly 50-60" tall at the beginning of March.

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Sandy Loam

Wow.  I didn't know that sweet viburnum were very good for Arizona. In Florida, mine don't do well if we go without rain for two weeks (thirsty). Also, they max out at about 15 feet in height, which doesn't hide a large two storey home.

As for a hedge of ficus nitida in Phoenix, don't they defoliate in the colder winters there?  If so, you'd lose your privacy screen until it recovered, possibly at a smaller size.  Also, I am not sure how tall they get. 

Thanks for all the comments, Arizona, and please keep them coming.  I wish I had just started a new thread instead of hijacking your Arizona palm thread temporarily.

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Silas_Sancona
29 minutes ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow.  I didn't know that sweet viburnum were very good for Arizona. In Florida, mine don't do well if we go without rain for two weeks (thirsty). Also, they max out at about 15 feet in height, which doesn't hide a large two storey home.

As for a hedge of ficus nitida in Phoenix, don't they defoliate in the colder winters there?  If so, you'd lose your privacy screen until it recovered, possibly at a smaller size.  Also, I am not sure how tall they get. 

Thanks for all the comments, Arizona, and please keep them coming.  I wish I had just started a new thread instead of hijacking your Arizona palm thread temporarily.

Actually, forget things like Sweet Viburnum ( or any other Viburnum sp. / varieties ), Photinia, or Ligustrum ( non native Privet ) here in the Desert.. Full summer sun will kill them faster than anything..  Any nursery who'd tell you different isn't worth doing business with.

Another thing not mentioned regarding Italian Cypress here is not only are they attacked by Spider Mites, they also collect massive amounts of dust during our Monsoon Season Dust Storms..  I could never keep the ones stocked in the nursery i worked for looking good. Rinsing them after a good dusting made a mess.. Last year,  our back patio looked like someone had dumped brown flour all over everything after one of the bigger dust events. I can't imagine having to deal with 20ft tall dust mops surrounding my yard after a similar event.. Not worth the time..

Here, you have to think about stuff like Bougainvillea ..the big spiny types, native stuff like various Rhus ( Sumac ), Native Privet, ( Foresteria sp. ) Condalia, Texas Mtn. Laurel,  Desert Hackberry ( Celtis pallida ) among other desert tough stuff for creating screen.. Ficus nitida, Twisted Myrtle, and Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) are all evergreen year round. Ficus only defoliates when it gets really cold / during bad freezes.. None did this year which was kind of weird considering i saw 29-27F in the neighborhood at least 6 times through the winter.. Benjamin Ficus also planted in a few yards here didn't defoliate either.  Tamarind is another tree one could use as a screen, if trained / shaped to do so.. a lot of work to do so though.   Our heat doesn't bother them at all.. 

Some people still use Oleander but with Oleander Scorch spreading like wildfire across the valley, it won't be much longer before you don't see them used near as much.. The leaf litter they generate ( unless cleaned regularly ) is also apparently a magnet for Bark Scorpions, or is what people who work for pest control companies have told me.

As for height, there are many 45+ ft Ficus nitida. all over the valley, especially around here in Chandler, Mesa, and Tempe.  Only problem w / ficus can be the roots.. I would never plant them on a small lot. Even kept trimmed / smaller -sized.. the roots will wander, seeking water, no matter what..  That might not bother one person, but the neighbors might be seeing red. I also believe some of the newer housing developments don't allow home owners to plant Ficus anymore. Sissoo is another that is being outlawed in newer developments as well.

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Merlyn2220
7 hours ago, Sandy Loam said:

Wow.  I didn't know that sweet viburnum were very good for Arizona. In Florida, mine don't do well if we go without rain for two weeks (thirsty). Also, they max out at about 15 feet in height, which doesn't hide a large two storey home.

I didn't mean to suggest sweet Viburnum would be a good choice for Arizona.  I was just commenting that Italian Cypress has some serious drawbacks if you are trying to create a solid privacy barrier.  They also don't grow straight up, so you could end up with a lot of "V" shaped openings, even if you plant them really dense.

For Viburnum in FL I'm surprised to hear them looking bad without daily water, my neighbors have a 20ft + height Viburnum hedge that never sees water from a sprinkler, and it looks great!

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Sandy Loam

Thanks, everyone.  Silas-Sancona, I have saved all of your invaluable comments for future reference.  I don't know whether I will end up buying a house in the Valley of the Sun, but it is still a possibility (buy now cheaper, then retire there in 20+ years there; rent until then). 

Why is Sissoo also being outlawed by some HOAs?  Does it also have invasive roots?  In my case, these would be planted as a tall hedge around three sides of the back yard, so I wouldn't want huge ficus-style roots creeping off onto the neighbour's property.  I am not familiar with Ficus Nitida, but the usual ficus types seen here in Florida are not hedges.  They are gigantic trees here with massive roots above and below ground.  Some have roots big enough for children to play in.

From your screening hedge suggestions above, which ones will give me 25 feet in height within, say, eight years (if planted fairly small and remain irrigated once or twice a week)?  Is that unrealistic for ANY of these hedges?  I would also need something dense enough that I can't see right through it.  I can handle thorny, although I would naturally prefer something that won't harm children playing in the back yard.   Of course, not all lawn maintenance companies will be willing to keep such a tall hedge trimmed anyway, but I guess I will deal with that when I have to.   Thanks! 

Anyone else who has comments from your Valley of the Sun experience, please contribute too!

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aztropic

Ahem...Back to the palms in Arizona! Here is a small strip of 5 palms I recently planted in my backyard and all should do well as I have been growing these species for years here unprotected.These were all grown from seed and many siblings have been distributed around PHX metro.Ravenea,Coccothrinax,Thrinax.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15530976840113791635969626512881.jpg

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SueH_AZ

Greetings all... It has been a while since I've posted (so long that aztropic did a virtual welfare check... lol).  I promised a couple of update pics so here goes.

First, the pseudophoenix sargentii we purchased from aztropic in 2013.  It's planted at the base of a phoenix canariensis for filtering from the hottest sun.  It's a slow grower but a beautiful tree and hasn't struggled a bit since we planted it.  Definitely a favorite!  

20190331_085247.jpg

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SueH_AZ

This one we bought from aztropic also, I think in 2014.  I'm hoping he can help me with an ID... I believe it's coccothrinax radiata.  This one gets full sun most of the day and takes winter like a champ.  No cover whatsoever.  A nice little accent palm.20190331_085354.thumb.jpg.72af2653a7fa518ca53073beb4b44b33.jpg

 

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SueH_AZ
On 3/20/2019 at 9:49 AM, Sandy Loam said:

Why is Sissoo also being outlawed by some HOAs?  Does it also have invasive roots?  In my case, these would be planted as a tall hedge around three sides of the back yard, so I wouldn't want huge ficus-style roots creeping off onto the neighbour's property.  I am not familiar with Ficus Nitida, but the usual ficus types seen here in Florida are not hedges.  They are gigantic trees here with massive roots above and below ground.  Some have roots big enough for children to play in.

Sissoo have VERY invasive roots, to the point where they're destroying pools and causing many other problems.  Our nextdoor neighbors removed a large one when they bought the house two years ago because they had significant cracking in their cool deck a good 25 feet from the trunk.  The landscaper told them they caught it just in time before it caused structural damage to the pool itself.

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SueH_AZ
On 2/23/2019 at 10:09 AM, aztropic said:

 

15509415996243006311634337600249.jpg

Holy cow, I think your bizmarckia has put on 10' since the last time I saw it!

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DesertCoconut
On 2/23/2019 at 10:09 AM, aztropic said:

Low of 37F here in Mesa,Arizona; no further freezing.I rarely protect anything anymore.1 night of 28F in early January did the damage for the year with 25 to 50% burn on the tender material. Everything planted in ground will survive. Same tender species in pots have 75 % survival so far...

Next week will warm up to the mid 70's highs and our growing season will officially begin.Winter is finally behind us!

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15509415996243006311634337600249.jpg

@aztropic,

What are the 2 copernicias right in front? I was looking at photos I took 2 years ago and the growth rate is impressive.

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AZPalms

I was at Scott’s on Friday. Yard looks great, Scott! I also did a driveby on the corner of Brown and Power and saw the Brahea and Bismarkia and I see what you mean by difference in growth rate!

Sue, your Sargentii is looking awesome! I recently planted a 3g. Someday I hope mine looks as good. 

 

Max 

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aztropic
1 hour ago, SueH_AZ said:

This one we bought from aztropic also, I think in 2014.  I'm hoping he can help me with an ID... I believe it's coccothrinax radiata.  This one gets full sun most of the day and takes winter like a champ.  No cover whatsoever.  A nice little accent palm.20190331_085354.thumb.jpg.72af2653a7fa518ca53073beb4b44b33.jpg

 

Bought seed as Coccothrinax readii. You were probably thinking of Thrinax radiata which I also grew a batch of at that time.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic
1 hour ago, SueH_AZ said:

Greetings all... It has been a while since I've posted (so long that aztropic did a virtual welfare check... lol).  I promised a couple of update pics so here goes.

First, the pseudophoenix sargentii we purchased from aztropic in 2013.  It's planted at the base of a phoenix canariensis for filtering from the hottest sun.  It's a slow grower but a beautiful tree and hasn't struggled a bit since we planted it.  Definitely a favorite!  

20190331_085247.jpg

Seeds for this batch were planted early 2000's. They grow much faster in Florida although still considered slow. I have over a dozen planted around my yard and it's still one of my favorites!

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Edited by aztropic
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aztropic
2 minutes ago, DesertCoconut said:

@aztropic,

What are the 2 copernicias right in front? I was looking at photos I took 2 years ago and the growth rate is impressive.

Copernicia berteroana left,Copernicia macroglossa right.Both seem well adapted to our conditions.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

1554054107575998152309397188742.jpg

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aztropic

Copernicia baileyana is also a proven winner in our desert for those wanting to give the Copernicia species a shot.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

15540545526306519453439896635439.jpg

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DesertCoconut
28 minutes ago, aztropic said:

Copernicia berteroana left,Copernicia macroglossa right.Both seem well adapted to our conditions.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

 

1554054107575998152309397188742.jpg

Beautiful. I'm curious why you tie them up like that? I have 2 alba I grew from seed. They are super slow.  I just planted a glabrescens in a nice sunny spot. It grew right through our harsh winter without any damage. I had a couple ekmanii hybrid seedlings that didn't survive the winter. I collected those seeds from a trip to Florida last summer. I'm just fascinated by the whole genus. I would really like to find a nice hospita. Thanks for sharing. It's just amazing how species native to the Caribbean do so well here. 

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