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jtinla

Free palms SoCal

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jtinla

I have 5 rather large and heavy palms to give away. Free including nice container, only catch is you must haul away. I live in West Covina.

The plants are:

2 bismarckia nobilis in heavy blue ceramic pots. Plant is root bound and should be planted in the ground.

2 brahea armata in tall containers, very healthy, heavy.

1 livistona chinensis in large plastic container, 5 plants in one pot.

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porkchop

PM sent

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jtinla

Here are some pics, the Bismackias's are pushing out of the container. The Brahea's are quite healthy, the plants are heavy.

post-7481-0-21700300-1364608290_thumb.jp

post-7481-0-59812100-1364608314_thumb.jp

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jtinla

Forgot to post pic of the livistonia

post-7481-0-43993800-1364620066_thumb.jp

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porkchop

Jim ... Thank you very much for the great Bismarkias !!! I was able to put the 1st one in the ground. I'll keep you updated on the progress.

post-4088-0-02069900-1364960926_thumb.jp

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palmislandRandy

Very generous Jim, although my back aches looking at those full pots. :)

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SanDimas

Neighbor Jim.

Ritchy here from far faaar faaaaar away San Dimas.

Sorry just saw your thread.

Are the palms still available?

Cheers! Ritchy

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jtinla

Porkchop: glad you were able to plant the palm. I'm glad they got a good home.

SanDinas: I still have the Brahea's and livistonia.

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SanDimas

Jim youre awesome.

!!!Thank you!!!

Great addition to my garden.

Braheas being a slow grower and dont transplant very well...

I will keep in the belly high cylindrical pots.

Beautiful specimens.

Thank you.

Ritchy :)

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