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ghar41

Cold Hardy Garden

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dalmatiansoap

Beautifull garden & lovely note. I like that kind of notes, kids just know how to buy us :)

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Shirleypalmpaws

Glen, those photos are beautiful. If you have the chance, would you name them in the order that they appear, please? It would be helpful for us newbies :lol: Thanks!

The cold hardy forum is sheer enjoyment for me too... it's wonderful and very educational.

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Kailua_Krish

Thanks for sharing! Sometimes I'm envious of how "perfect" most California gardens look and your post doesnt help that :mrlooney:

-Krishna

P.S. I'm really enjoying the cold hardy forum too!

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Brahea Axel

Wow, simply amazing! Can you please share some of your experiences with various species of palms in Modesto? I am trying to build a hardy backbone to my garden, and would love to hear how some of the palms you grow rate. Modesto is much colder than we are here, your results are really useful to the rest of Norcal.

Your T martianus looks extraordinary! What's the first pinnate you show? Looks like a ravena, which one is it?

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sonoranfans

there is a lot of creativity in designing a cold hardy palm garden, seeing such a nice garden stimulates ideas in others. Glenn, yours is a great example of selections and design with palms covering several minimum zones. Very nice!

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WestCoastGal

Glenn, could you please list for us the above-roof height palms you have and how they do in general during your really cold temps? I saw a number of queens, maybe a few trachy species, and a king species? We're Sunset 14, 9b, as well but I suspect the pool, which we don't have, moderates the coldness for you.

The only overhead canopy we have right now is from our mules and we'll be adding another one shortly. I know Jeff is in your area and posted a P. coccoides photo of one he has growing (looks like in front of his house near the driveway) and curious if they can survive long-term.

Beautiful photos.

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daxin

Is the second photo Brahea moorei? Would the yellow leaves green up once it gets warmer? Your garden is ready for prime time. Are we going to have a meeting/tour at your place this year?

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fr8train

The seventh from the end is a martianus, right? Looks great.

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ghar41

Thank you for all of your replies! I have tagged all of the pictures with descriptions, try double clicking on the slideshow and it should open up. Also, if you move your cursor to the top, it will show options.

Worldsight, your plan to build a backbone of hardy palms is similar to my approach. I like to plant marginal palms also, but want them to supplement my garden. I wish now I would have planted more hybrids....way more interesting than my queen palms. Ive seen your comments about Illawara Kings in hot sun and yes, they burn in hot, low humidity. I like them because they grow so fast, and have alleviated the low humidity problem by installing a sprinkler at crown height that sprays for one minute eight times a day.

Westcoastgal, Ive tried P cocoides but not much long term success. P sunkha has been very successful for me in freezes so far, but have only been in the ground the past 5 years or so. I was very impressed at how a small plant did in my front yard this winter after many destructive frosts and freezes. I have Queen x Parajubaea sunkha hybrid seedlings that I am very excited about.

These pictures were taken at optimal times of the year, usually in the Fall.

Hi Daxin! I was considering a meeting at my place in the Fall but it looks like it will be pushed back to next year. That's ok, more growth!

Here are some more photos. Try double clicking on the slideshow to open up the descriptions.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/72316185@N03/sets/72157632924608203/show/

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Brahea Axel

Thank you for all of your replies! I have tagged all of the pictures with descriptions, try double clicking on the slideshow and it should open up. Also, if you move your cursor to the top, it will show options.

Worldsight, your plan to build a backbone of hardy palms is similar to my approach. I like to plant marginal palms also, but want them to supplement my garden. I wish now I would have planted more hybrids....way more interesting than my queen palms. Ive seen your comments about Illawara Kings in hot sun and yes, they burn in hot, low humidity. I like them because they grow so fast, and have alleviated the low humidity problem by installing a sprinkler at crown height that sprays for one minute eight times a day.

Westcoastgal, Ive tried P cocoides but not much long term success. P sunkha has been very successful for me in freezes so far, but have only been in the ground the past 5 years or so. I was very impressed at how a small plant did in my front yard this winter after many destructive frosts and freezes. I have Queen x Parajubaea sunkha hybrid seedlings that I am very excited about.

These pictures were taken at optimal times of the year, usually in the Fall.

Hi Daxin! I was considering a meeting at my place in the Fall but it looks like it will be pushed back to next year. That's ok, more growth!

Here are some more photos. Try double clicking on the slideshow to open up the descriptions.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/72316185@N03/sets/72157632924608203/show/

The syagrus hybrids have only recently become available at reasonable prices, it's never too late. They look very coconutty. I am making a trip down to Socal and was thinking of bringing back a couple of 16 footers. They're going for a lot less down there.

If only my Illawaras looked like yours. We get 2 or 3 heatwaves in the Summer that fry my Illawaras that are in full sun. Going from upper 70's to 108F will do it every time. I don't think misters are going to fix that problem. I have to switch to a more robust palm.

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ghar41

Thank you for all of your replies! I have tagged all of the pictures with descriptions, try double clicking on the slideshow and it should open up. Also, if you move your cursor to the top, it will show options.

Worldsight, your plan to build a backbone of hardy palms is similar to my approach. I like to plant marginal palms also, but want them to supplement my garden. I wish now I would have planted more hybrids....way more interesting than my queen palms. Ive seen your comments about Illawara Kings in hot sun and yes, they burn in hot, low humidity. I like them because they grow so fast, and have alleviated the low humidity problem by installing a sprinkler at crown height that sprays for one minute eight times a day.

Westcoastgal, Ive tried P cocoides but not much long term success. P sunkha has been very successful for me in freezes so far, but have only been in the ground the past 5 years or so. I was very impressed at how a small plant did in my front yard this winter after many destructive frosts and freezes. I have Queen x Parajubaea sunkha hybrid seedlings that I am very excited about.

These pictures were taken at optimal times of the year, usually in the Fall.

Hi Daxin! I was considering a meeting at my place in the Fall but it looks like it will be pushed back to next year. That's ok, more growth!

Here are some more photos. Try double clicking on the slideshow to open up the descriptions.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/72316185@N03/sets/72157632924608203/show/

The syagrus hybrids have only recently become available at reasonable prices, it's never too late. They look very coconutty. I am making a trip down to Socal and was thinking of bringing back a couple of 16 footers. They're going for a lot less down there.

If only my Illawaras looked like yours. We get 2 or 3 heatwaves in the Summer that fry my Illawaras that are in full sun. Going from upper 70's to 108F will do it every time. I don't think misters are going to fix that problem. I have to switch to a more robust palm.

I use a toro 12' radius 90 degree arc nozzle fed by 1/2 inch pvc so the spray is much heavier than a misting. It drenches the leaves every three hours, night and day. Also, I start Kings on the side of my house that faces east so younger trees get morning sun only. I get consecutive 100+ degree days with lower humidity on average than your location. I do understand your hesitation to grow Kings though, it's a lot of work to get them to look good, and they can't always be planted in the most aesthetically pleasing location.

I can't say enough about Parajubaea sunkha, Butia x Parajubaea oderatata, and the Jubaea x queen hybrid. I'm in the process of taking out other palms in my yard to make room for these.

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ghar41

*Butia x Parajubaea cocoides

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Brahea Axel

if anyone has a butia about to bloom, one of my cocoides is growing a spear, so it should bloom this Spring. We could do some more crosses.

Your sprinkler setup sounds interesting. I have a different problem from yours. Being at a higher elevation in a coastal valley means the weather fluctuates based on how deep the marine inversion layer is. When i am above the inversion layer, temperatures soar into the 90's to low 100's. But the rest of the time, the garden is in a warm and humid coastal air mass. Even apple trees burn n this sort of sudden switch from warm and moist to hot and dry. Since I have 3/4 acre to maintain with a rather large collection of palms and fruit trees, so I'll have to pass on the sprinkler, otherwise I'd have to watch the weather constantly to estimate when the marine layer is shallow enough to have to be concerned.

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Jimhardy

Beautiful !

Love the layout and selection of palms...

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