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Jastin

Parajubaea sp. - 3 years from a small 5 gallon

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Jastin

This was planted from a small 5 gallon 3 years ago without amending the soil. It seems really slow to me at around 2 leaves a year but I'm starting to see a little size on it. The leaves spread out a lot more than the tor tors that I've seen and with the speed being slow I don't know exactly what it is but it's looking good! The top leaf is about 5 feet.

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E39BA925-C533-400D-9720-41FBDFB38236-406

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Stevetoad

Still doesn't look like tor for to me.

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Tassie_Troy1971

Looks good Justin and that is about normal growth for down here as i have 2 on my front lawn .

Cheers Troy

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Jastin

Looks good Justin and that is about normal growth for down here as i have 2 on my front lawn .

Cheers Troy

Thats good to know Troy, thanks. What kind do you have? All the toralleyis i've seen have a more upright look to them. I'll have to get an areal shot of mine tomorrow to show how spread out it is.

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Peter

Has anyone had success growing Parajubaeas in sandy soil? The best looking ones I've seen are all in heavy soil, and the couple that I've tried in my very sandy soil haven't really done much.

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Jastin

Has anyone had success growing Parajubaeas in sandy soil? The best looking ones I've seen are all in heavy soil, and the couple that I've tried in my very sandy soil haven't really done much.

I have heavy soil that drains ok where it is planted. Have you tried amending your soil with heavier things or had a thick mulch base?

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Brahea Axel

The parajubaea in that picture looks more like a cocoides. I have 8 of those at different stages, I can definitely ID them pretty well. Mine grow in pure sand, they need moisture and high nitrogen fertilizer to really grow well. They definitely do not mind sandy soil but they don't like not being fed. I saw the same effect with torallyi. All the parajubaeas stagnate without regular fertilization.

But they definitely do not mind sandy soil, and the only one planted at the bottom of my property as a hardiness test where there is super heavy clay isn't growing any faster than the other ones.

Mine grow in "pushes" where suddenly it's almost like an entirely new crown emerges as they reach skywards.

On the ID, torallyi has a much more upright frond growth form. The recurving leaf is a signature of cocoides. But the fronds on yours look short, so maybe they will get stiffer and more upright later. I still think it's a cocoides.

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Tassie_Troy1971

G day Jastin

My Torallyii is planted in very sandy soil and is much more upright than yours ,maybe it's trying to keep warm because of our 6 months of freezing temperatures . :floor:

Ok Jastin i ran outdoors and took a picture for you mate !

It's watered in summer every 4 days for 2 yrs on a drip system .

parajubaeatorallyii.jpg

cheers

Troy

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Tassie_Troy1971

same palm 3 yrs ago

paratortor.jpg

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Harry

Allow me to show mine also.

Same age as yours growing in silty clay with good drainage.


It has really exploded in growth this winter after spending more than a year in suspended animation 9or so it seemed).

It hates our hot summers.

post-1782-0-45908500-1362468204_thumb.jp

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Tassie_Troy1971

Harry that looks exactly like mine !

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Harry

Your thingy is the same size as my thingy!!


I’ll apply some fertilizer soon to see if it grows even faster.

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Phoenikakias

Allow me to show mine also.

Same age as yours growing in silty clay with good drainage.

It has really exploded in growth this winter after spending more than a year in suspended animation 9or so it seemed).

It hates our hot summers.

Have you applied any pesticide on root zone?

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Peter

Thanks everyone, good to know they will be ok in sandy soil-I will up the water and fertilizer on my slope.

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Brahea Axel

Peter, I have several planted on my sandy slope, lots of sand stone up there, fertilizer just washes away and drains, and they really need a lot of watering and fertilizer in those conditions at first to get going. But once the roots go a bit deeper, it gets easier.

My torallyi var torallyi I planted 14 years ago stagnated for an entire year until I clued in on what was going on. It actually "reverted" making smaller fronds, so I dumped a bunch of fertilizer, and it just took off within a couple of weeks.

Try palm fertilizer spikes, see http://www.treehelp.com/treehelp-complete-palm-fertilizer-spikes/. Great for sandy soil. I am going to get some and put them under the drippers. You can get them in bulk directly from Lutz at http://www.lutzcorp.com/p-16-maintenance-spike-for-maintaining-healthy-palms.aspx.

BTW, I ended up terracing my slope with sonoma rock, it makes a massive difference, slows drainage and slows the fertilizer wash off. We get 50-60 inches of rain normally between Nov and April, but not this year, major drought.

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Jastin

Thanks all for the insight and pics. Here are a few more pics.

B971267E-C040-4579-AF18-194DB7A894C2-433

AA27CB3C-A443-4115-AEF6-0E58961DBA2C-433

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7B9B91CB-9E10-401A-8E67-86F589844F70-433

A13AD09C-2032-4DD9-B8D6-3B1AC568DEC3-433

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Brahea Axel

The fronds are sort of too short to be a p. cocoides. Could it be macrocarpa?

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DoomsDave

Jastin:

That's a nice Parajube, whatever it is.

I don't think it's a cocoides (not to start a brawl with those who disagree). The primary reason I think it's not a "cokee" is that your plant is already totally pinnate. Cokees take their sweet time to do that. I have three in the ground, and all have been slow to go pinnate. At six feet or more, they were still producing "juvenile" or "psuedo juvenile" entire or nearly entire leaves, with windows in them. Neat, actually. I'll have to post some pictures.

I'm quite certain your plant is something else. I always thought tor tors were more spreading in habit. I do know they're HUGE with time, the biggest of all the Parajubes.

I'll see if I can post some pictures.

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Brahea Axel

Dave, I think you are right. I just went out and looked at my younger cocoides, they push out really long fronds that aren't all the way pinnate for a long time. And the palm in the picture has fronds that are too short to be pinnate for a cocoides youngster. I can post a picture later.

I suppose this is a torallyi with very nicely recurved fronds. :)

Jastin:

That's a nice Parajube, whatever it is.

I don't think it's a cocoides (not to start a brawl with those who disagree). The primary reason I think it's not a "cokee" is that your plant is already totally pinnate. Cokees take their sweet time to do that. I have three in the ground, and all have been slow to go pinnate. At six feet or more, they were still producing "juvenile" or "psuedo juvenile" entire or nearly entire leaves, with windows in them. Neat, actually. I'll have to post some pictures.

I'm quite certain your plant is something else. I always tor tors were more spreading in habit. I do know they're HUGE with time, the biggest of all the Parajubes.

I'll see if I can post some pictures.

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Got Palms

Jastin here are 3 that i have in heavy clay from a 15 gal 3 years ago, 2 look the same and the other a little different the individual that sold them to me swears they are from the same seed batch!

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post-3040-0-41815200-1362514671_thumb.jp

post-3040-0-83423000-1362514682_thumb.jp

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Jastin

That first pic looks just like mine, the last 2 pics look like all the other tor tors I've seen. I didn't see these in your garden gallery!

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Tassie_Troy1971

Jastin What is the palm way over in the background near the White wall Rhopalostylis ??

Troy

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Firepalm

Jastin What is the palm way over in the background near the White wall Rhopalostylis ??

Troy

Hey Troy, Jastin can confirm, but that palm is a Chatham Island "Oceana".

Jastin - My vote on your Parajub is that it is a tor tor with a less upright habit than the standard form. The only other known species not discussed so far on here is Sunkha and I don't think it is a Sunkha because the undersides of your leaves have too much copper/rust color. All of the Sunkhas I have seen are more or less silver white underneath without any of the copper color. Regardless it is a beautiful palm and will only look better as it gets older.

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MattyB

Jastin, I was looking at my P. torallyi 'microcarpa' this morning and it looks a lot like yours. I know mine is correctly identified because I grew it from seed. I think it would be even more laxed if I didn't have the rabbit cage holding it upright.

post-126-0-31301000-1362596694_thumb.jpg

post-126-0-81575500-1362596704_thumb.jpg

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MattyB

For comparison, here's a young P. sunkah. It looks very similar to P. torallyi 'microcarpa', but as Firepalm pointed out, it seems to be pure silver on the undersides, where the P. tor micro has a slight bronze coloration.

post-126-0-20373400-1362597760_thumb.jpg

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MattyB

It might be worth noting that several years ago, when I was growing a lot of stuff from seed, I noticed that P. tor tor seed was much more expensive than P. tor microcarpa. So if your palm was labled just "P. torallyi", it might be more likely that it's P. torallyi 'microcarpa', due to the cheaper seed.

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Geoff

Planted all my Parajubaeas out in 2005... got them in 2002 as dinky seedlings (see photos below). First photo are my babies 2002 (may be 2001... can't remember any more). Then the before and after of Parajubaea sunkha, Parajubaea torralyi microcarpa (or sold as such), and lastly before and after of Parajubaea torrallyi torrallyi... seems like the last two should be reversed, but that was how I purchased them.

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Geoff

When I planted all these palms (most planted the same time) I thought for sure the Phoenix canariensis hybrids (in the back), King Palm (can't even see it here, but against the house) or maybe a Butia (planted out at a larger size) would be the tallest palm in the yard... but all three Parajubaeas win the race for the highest leaves in the air, with the P torrallyi on the left behind the Nannorrhops being the winner... nearly 20' tall. These are truly fast palms!

post-426-0-19288900-1362601118_thumb.jpg

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MattyB

That's great Geoff! I've gotta get my Tor Tor in the ground now!!!!!

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Jastin

Troy, yes it is a rhopie var oceana. This is the one and only palm my wife planted and of course it looks flawless. Full winter sun and filtered summer sun. The oceana I planted In the back yard looks like crap and pulled itself way underground-go figure.

Matt, thanks for the comparison. What's the difference between parajubaea macrocarpa and parajubaea tor tor var macrocarpa? I really like how mine looks, I guess I just want to know how it will look when it's older.

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Jastin

For comparison, here's a young P. sunkah. It looks very similar to P. torallyi 'microcarpa', but as Firepalm pointed out, it seems to be pure silver on the undersides, where the P. tor micro has a slight bronze coloration.

Ok, all my leave undersides are silver except for one which is slightly bronze. You can see in the last pic in post #16.

Geoff, great looking stuff! I know now that I really want the more upright form too!

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DoomsDave

That's great Geoff! I've gotta get my Tor Tor in the ground now!!!!!

Give it room. It will get three feet across the base or more. Don't do like I did and plant it right next to the house . . . .

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Stevetoad

What do I have then? Bought as microcarpa. It's fast and flat. At a bit over 8ft it still has windows

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post-5835-0-05560300-1362604038_thumb.jp

post-5835-0-08285300-1362604054_thumb.jp

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Stevetoad

This is my tor tor. It's slower than microcarpa and is very twisted. It also has no windows and is smaller than my micro

post-5835-0-44591200-1362604384_thumb.jp

post-5835-0-87181500-1362604401_thumb.jp

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MattyB

Steve, your first one, that you call microcarpa, is probably P. cocoides.

Jastin, don't get them confused. There is Parajubaea torallyi var. 'torallyi', this one is the one with the huge gnarly seed that can be used several times to germinate several different plants. Then there is Parajubaea torallyi var. 'microcarpa', which is pretty much the same plant but has a much smaller seed.

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Stevetoad

What's this? There were about 5 of these in the pot with my tor tor. Maybe it can help. Btw I just figured out that I can upload pics straight from iPhone now without having to use photobucket! Yesssssss

post-5835-0-04019400-1362612768_thumb.jp

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MattyB

Steve,

That's P. torallyi var. 'torallyi' aka tor tor. Sow those seeds, they'll germinate again, sometimes years later.

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Stevetoad

Steve,

That's P. torallyi var. 'torallyi' aka tor tor. Sow those seeds, they'll germinate again, sometimes years later.

I've been chewing on it

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MattyB

Feed it to your pet gopher

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Stevetoad

Feed it to your pet gopher

That's cold. You know he just passed away. :(

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