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Kailua_Krish

Cold hardy substitutes

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Kailua_Krish

So we all have those tropical palms we've seen and had to have, but sadly they won't survive your freezes. What do you use instead? Here are some of mine:

Coconut- Mule palm

Royal- Queen palm

Cocothrinax/Thrinax- Chamaerops/Trachycarpus

What others can you think of?

-Krishna

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JakeK

For my area, in order to get a more tropical look we have to use plants like Musa basjoo, Yucca thompsonsiana x rostrata, Yucca rostrata, Cannas, ginger, castor oil plant, Aucuba, etc.

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sonoranfans

more cocoid hybrids: butjubaea, butia x parajubaea, and yes even syagrus x jubaea is a gorgeous tropical looking palm. all should be good to 8b and substitute for cocos or royals... I like these for my yard without needing their cold hardiness...

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Kailua_Krish

Sabal causiarum for Borassus?

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Kailua_Krish

Butia for some of the interesting Ravenea?

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Palmə häl′ik

Somebody needs to throw a big B.alfredii in full frost conditions, cuz I know seedlings can't take it, so those aren't as cold hardy as the hype leads everyone to believe....

I lost many, many lil uns a few years back...

- Ray.

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Palmə häl′ik

I wish they were tho, the coco look is there yakno...

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sonoranfans

Sabal causiarum for Borassus?

yes, causiarum, the grandest sabal of them all! A magnificent palm in any zone... probably good to zone 8a

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Kailua_Krish

They have a Causiarum in the Atlanta botanical garden, don't they?

-Krishna

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sonoranfans

Somebody needs to throw a big B.alfredii in full frost conditions, cuz I know seedlings can't take it, so those aren't as cold hardy as the hype leads everyone to believe....

I lost many, many lil uns a few years back...

- Ray.

Ray,

I think 2010 did them in eh? If only they had made it past a few winters before they got that one. My alfredii(3) are doing great, one was out in the open and completely defoliated with 2 hard frosts in 2010. It came back nicely, sits at 5'+ overall today.. But alfredii are needing more data to understand their cold hardiness. the best coconut substitue Ive seen is butia x parajubaea cocoides... a very tropical looking palm.

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Palmə häl′ik

YesSir.

The way I see it B.alfrediis a z10 palm.

If it can't take frost from the get go, its not "cold hardy".

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Kailua_Krish

My alfrediis do well but are under heavy canopy.

-Krishna

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Palmə häl′ik

Right. But the real test is to put em out in the open. Unprotected, yaknow. Theres plenty of palms that will make it under canopy.

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sonoranfans

YesSir.

The way I see it B.alfrediis a z10 palm.

If it can't take frost from the get go, its not "cold hardy".

then take sabal domingensis off the list, cant take frost as a strapper... Come to think of it that would take a whole bunch of palms off the zone 9b list.

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Kailua_Krish

Same for many of the colder zones. Protection from tress and buildings is key.

-Krishna

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Kailua_Krish

Just got a Sabal uresana from the SFPS sale at Montgomery. Good replacement for a bizmarkia? I've heard of them doing well up in Augusta and such!

-Krishna

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Gallop

Krishna, what size S uresana did you get? I wonder if anyone has any larger plants for sale? I've saw a couple 15gals available a couple years back.

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Kailua_Krish

5 gallon from Faith Bishock, she may have larger sizes though, i didnt ask. There was a larger one from another seller but it didn't have the blue coloring and looked suspiciously like another sabal species.

-Krishna

Edited by krishnaraoji88

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