Jump to content
Trópico

2012 Biennial of the IPS - Part 1: South Thailand Pre-Tour

Recommended Posts

Trópico

5:45 PM: We arrived and checked in at the Rua Rasada Hotel in Trang. Members were greeted with a Light Mango Shake, one of their drinks of the month.

DSC02284.jpg

DSC00095.jpg

The spacious room's most prominent feature was the LARGE size window opening into a rounded terrace.

DSC02285.jpg

Our room overlooked some tennis courts directly below then a view of a large empty lot amid suburban Trang. It was at best drizzling and at worst copiously raining so we never saw or, much less, went into the pool.

DSC02286.jpg

I don't have pics of the nice evening dinner, with soothing classical background music and the sweat and tears shed at the tone of one of the most spicy meals I've ever had, but that's how Day 2 ended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The events of the day, compiled by our guide Steven.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Day 3: Friday, September 7, 2012

Rua Rasada Hotel, Thap Thiang, Muang Trang, Trang, Thailand

post-47-0-93461200-1351993398.jpg

6:56 AM: After we woke up around 5:30 AM and packed our luggage, we joined our guide Steven for breakfast. Since we had to change hotels on a daily basis on the Biennial Pre-Tour (except the last one), every day our morning drill included waking up early and packing our luggage before breakfast.

DSC02287.jpg

This hotel's breakfast bar offered some exquisite Thai dishes that we did not find elsewhere in the tour. This particular one was my Biennial All-time favorite, easily rivaling the heavenly Thai cup cakes. Two types of sticky rice ข้าวเหนียว (kao niaw) wrapped in banana leaves. The dark one was so delicious that I thought, oblivious of sticky rice's existence, that it was something made from cocoa.

DSC02288.jpg

Errata #002: In post #12, Day 2: Thursday, September 5, 2012 should read Day 2: Thursday, September 6, 2012 . Just took me a day and a copy/paste operation to figure it out. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Rua Rasada hotel lobby main staircase

DSC02289.jpg

Tuk-tuk parked just outside of the hotel entrance. The auto rickshaw, called tuk-tuk (ตุ๊กตุ๊ก pronounced "took-took") is a widely used form of urban transport in Thailand. It is particularly popular where traffic congestion is a major problem. The name comes from the onomatopoeic mimic of the sound of a small engine.

DSC00096.jpg

DSC00097.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle

Frank,

It appears the trip is going very smoothly. In another words, I WISH I COULD OF BEEN ALONG FOR ALL THE FUN!!!! I look forward to more adventure.... :drool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Fountain with Chinese serpents. Serpent symbolism (Nagas) is very predominant in oriental culture, mythology, and religion. Far in the parking lot, some members begin loading luggage into the bus while taking photographs of the big shrine.

DSC00098.jpg

Local architecture reminds me of newer style strip malls you could find while driving on 434.

DSC00100.jpg

The hotel, oddly shaped like a boat coming out of a building... :hmm:

DSC00101.jpg

DSC00105.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The hotel's shrine housing Brahma (Phra Phrom), the four faced hindu god of good fortune and protection for the Thai people.

DSC00102.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

7:56 AM: We left the hotel in the lovely city of Trang, en route to Wang Wiset District, Trang province.

DSC00107.jpg

Our palm expert guide Anders Lindstrom of Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical Gardens briefed the group on the palm species we were going to see at the locations visited that day.

DSC02292.jpg

Guide Ron kept us entertained and informed in the hour long bus trip.

DSC02293.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Along the way we saw street plantings of Borassus flabellifer as well as more common tropical palms.

DSC02294.jpg

DSC00118.jpg

DSC02300.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KONADANTOM

Mahalo / Gracias / Thank You very much Frank for this wonderful detailed message thread from our Southern Thailand Pretour adventures - I met Ryan on my first Biennial (Costa Rica 2008), and his love of photography and willingness to share his experiences inspired me to then enter the fun world of digital photography.

Your photos and narrative are in the tradition of Ryan the Great, and much appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Thanks Dan, and a pleasure to meet you!

This nice Dypsis baronii somehow got in the way when I took the picture. :drool:

DSC02301.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

9:28 AM: Location: A street by a hill to be climbed, somewhere in the Wang Wiset District, Trang. (sorry, I had no idea where in the world district was this).

Now for some climbing background music! กล้วยไทย

(.....ID on 3:28....?)

WangWiset.jpg

We arrived in the middle of an oil palm plantation. We got to take a closer look at the African oil palm, Elaeis guineensis.

DSC02303.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02304.jpg

Heavy duty deep forest insect repellent scent suddenly filled the fresh rural air, and covered many an exposed arm, leg, neck, or face.

DSC02305.jpg

Several members made it to what looked like a private residence not far from the road and into the oil palm plantation.

DSC02306.jpg

Each member was given a bamboo stick which was essential for the upcoming climb.

DSC02310.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02311.jpg

More staff from Nong Nooch Pattaya joined us for this expedition, with a decent camera coverage.

DSC00121.jpg

Member Francisco del Real, from Mexico, walks back to join the group. There was a decent line for the last chance "happy room".

DSC02313.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

9:35 AM: Our guide staff led the way across the oil palm plantation to reach the path that took us to the hill.

DSC00122.jpg

DSC00123.jpg

DSC02314.jpg

A sudden clearing of the field revealed the deceptively small looking hill that we set to climb, to the left.

DSC02315.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Member Yenny fully geared up and ready to climb!

DSC02316.jpg

Yours truly against a denser forest setting (At this point, my brand new Ron Jon explorer's hat was miles away, on its way to Bangkok. I left it on the back seat of one of the mini buses the day before :angry: The guides located it but I told them to keep it as a gift).

DSC00124.jpg

Several of us took a short break as the hike was slowly becoming a bit sloped at this point. Yenny Lozada smiles for the camera as member David Tanswell talks to staff guides. Michael Merritt (Mike in Kurtistown) appears ready for the challenge.

DSC02318.jpg

"Let's go!"

DSC00125.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The ground was carpeted with these cool looking ferns with new copperish leaf.

DSC00126.jpg

A few of us were already slightly ahead.

DSC02319.jpg

DSC02320.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

9:45 AM: The steep climb began. Our guides came previously and fitted the trail with a rope tied to many trees all the way to the top of the hill. David was chosen to lead the way.

DSC02321.jpg

DSC02322.jpg

First palm in habitat spotted, a Calamus species, about a third of the way up. Shoe for size.

DSC02323.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The climb is steeper than it looks.

th_M4H02324.jpg

And at one point it seems like it goes on forever.

DSC02325.jpg

And here it is, Maxburretia furtadoana.

DSC02326.jpg

DSC02327.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Trunk densely covered in persistent leaf sheats turned into spines.

DSC02329.jpg

The palm occurs from two thirds of the way up all the way to the top of the hill.

DSC00128.jpg

Genus name in honor of Max Burret, a German botanist.

DSC02330.jpg

Discovered by John Dransfield in 1978.

DSC02332.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The view from the top of the hill to nearby hills whose tops disappeared into the fog.

DSC02333.jpg

Dr. Larry Klotz made it to the top efficiently handling the bamboo pole with one hand and the rope with the other. We were lucky to not have to deal with leeches in this part of the country.

DSC02334.jpg

10:04 AM: The quest is complete!

DSC02335.jpg

This one had a few old infructescences and a few new ones with no viable seeds.

DSC02336.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02337.jpg

DSC02338.jpg

Member Ramón Valle Garcia from Guadalajara, Mexico enjoying the view. I don't recall whether he was having a smoke, or fog was hovering over his hat, or a water droplet fell on my camera lens.

DSC02339.jpg

DSC02342.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The habitat of Maxburretia furtadoana.

DSC02343.jpg

There was also this species of orchid but unfortunately none were in flower at the time.

DSC02344.jpg

In the distance the surrounding hills loomed dark and grim.

DSC02345.jpg

This must be the oldest individual we found.

DSC02346.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Yenny, Frank, Ramón, Jorge.

DSC02347.jpg

Ground cover gives you an idea of how humid it is.

DSC02348.jpg

DSC02350.jpg

Young inflorescence.

DSC02352.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02361.jpg

New leaf color.

DSC02362.jpg

Just as I turned my head around after taking the last picture, I noticed this weaver ant colony just at eye level. Our guides told us they don't sting but they bite quite painfully, but ceases to hurt when they let go, as they don't inject any acid like fire ants.

DSC02363.jpg

Amazing how they pull the leaves together to make their nests.

DSC02365.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle

Frank,

Your doing a great job with showing all of us that could not make the trip...and wish that we could of! Amazing pictures and narrative is superb! Truely enjoying all of this.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

I agree with Jeff, splendid job so far Frank! keep it up please... !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walter John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Up came Steven our guide to capture the event for his daily video. That very night we were enjoying his work!

DSC02367.jpg

DSC02372.jpg

10:25 AM: The group picture. Not naming the guides (I don't know their names), from left to right, back row: Grant Stephenson (palm a grant it), Paul Craft (Licuala), Barbara Van Derveer, Frank Lozada (Trópico), Ramón Valle Garcia, Michael Merritt (Mike in Kurtistown); middle row: Jim, Tony (TonyDFW), Jorge del Real, Dan Ashley (KONADANTOM); front row: Anders Lindstrom, and Francisco del Real.

DSC02375.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Weaver ant's empire.

DSC02377.jpg

More members who I didn't have the opportunity to picture made their way up eventually, so that every member present had the opportunity to be at that amazing place, get to know that particularly rare palm, and enjoy the scenery.

10:40 AM: The descent began. Ramón and Francisco found out (as well as myself and many other members) that the way down, although downhills, proved to be harder than imagined. There was always the threat of slipping, and our feet got tired quickly, much like applying the brakes for many minutes while driving on a long downhills road.

DSC02380.jpg

As for myself, I get distracted very easily. I spotted this Calamus sp. on the way down and I stopped for a closer look. It was my first time ever seeing any member of this fascinating palm genus. And after I touched it didn't let me go (literally). :drool:

DSC02381.jpg

The spines!

DSC02384.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

"Trunking". It is FASCINATING how that palm literally dives through the jungle in search for light, as we shall see later.

DSC02385.jpg

Trunk base with spiny old leaf sheaths.

DSC02387.jpg

Under leaf with "hooks", convenient for climbing.

DSC02391.jpg

New leaf spear.

DSC02393.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Flagellum.

DSC02394.jpg

DSC02396.jpg

10:58 AM: Consequently I was the last one back down.

DSC02399.jpg

Got a little sidetracked in the oil palm plantation. Elaeis guineensis fruit.

DSC02400.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

I had a feeling I was not here on the way up. :hmm:

DSC02401.jpg

11:04 AM: But finally arrived at the house, after finding the street first. Everybody was about done eating or washing off the mud from their shoes.

DSC02402.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The locals were very eager and pleased to be in the pictures with us.

DSC02403.jpg

DSC02404.jpg

Lunch was awaiting us when we came back down from the hill. It consisted of a sandwich, an orange, bananas, langsat, and a delicious mangosteen juice!

DSC02405.jpg

Our friend followed us from Orlando, and stayed here it seems (haven't seen him again, after the trip! :) )

DSC02408.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The guides were helping us with pictures and what not.

DSC02409.jpg

DSC02410.jpg

Langsat tree. The fruit is a little better tasting (and rarer) than Longan.

DSC02412.jpg

DSC02413.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The big group picture!

DSC02414.jpg

DSC02416.jpg

Anders. Lontar leaf homemade cigarette?

DSC02417.jpg

Pic with locals next to front neighbor's spirit house.

DSC02419.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

A spirit house or san phra phum (ศาลพระภูมิ) is a shrine to the protective spirit of a place that are found in the Southeast Asian countries of Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Most houses and businesses have one placed in an auspicious spot, most often in a corner of the property. Spirit worship in Thailand goes back to the ancient days when the Tai's were beginning their slow migration from the Red River Delta in northern Vietnam to all parts of the Southeast Asian region. It was a religion by which the entire world lived at one time, and when Buddhism came to SE Asia, it developed side by side with the ancient spirit religion. The houses are finished with statues, small figures, or symbols of many other sorts in the center within the spirit house. In addition, there may be various animal figures, figures of people, and furniture. Around the balcony surrounding the spirit house, incense holders, candle sticks, and vases for flowers are placed.

DSC02420.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walter John

Dear Frank, are you going to post something similar for the Nong Nooch part of the biennial ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rafael

Dear Frank, are you going to post something similar for the Nong Nooch part of the biennial ?

I have been wondering exactly the same!

What an amazing thread!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair
      On PT I see all the stunning photos and descriptions of past and future travel with the International Palm Society. 
      Here’s the group of us on the unforgettable Sarawak, Borneo pre tour in 2016.

      I recall times I almost did not sign up due to time, family and work constraints and costs involved.
      However every time it is only the trips I missed that I regret.
      And the friendships I have made across the world are at least as important as the sights and experiences.
      I took my first IPS trip using hoarded airline points through a country I had to find on a map (Qatar) to a place of my dreams (Thailand) in 2012, based primarily on comments by Palm Talk users I had never met.
      I am asking all of you now who have traveled anywhere on an IPS sponsored trip to post why you loved your trip(s). 
      Photos always welcome, but not required. 
    • SW_FL_Palms
      By SW_FL_Palms
      IPS has posted it's pre & post tours.   Unfortunately, the do not go to areas where you can see the Spiny Forest, Succulents,  Baobabs.  Of course, it is the palm society so they are focused on palms.
      Is there anyone out there that would like to join us on Madagascar tour that would take us to see the iconic plants that I listed above ?   A tour company will customize. and provide a quote    So let me know if you are interested, and preference for either before or after the biennial in Reunion.   
       
    • Tracy S
      By Tracy S
      I understand the 2020 IPS Biennial will be held in Reunion Island. Do we have firm dates yet? When will the travel details be available?
       
    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair
      I have been asked to post this notice from the IPS to add to your options for charitable giving.  
    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair

      Por favor entren al sitio electronico del IPS (palms.org) and dirijasen a "Palms Current Year" para ver que ahora nosotros tenemos traducciones al español de artículos selectos.

      Cliqueen en el vinculo "Leer en Español"  para ver estos artículos (completos con fotos y titulos) traducidos al español.

      Las traducciones han sido verificadas y mejoradas por miembros de la junta directiva del IPS - compuesta por Fernando Pacho Roca y Paco Marti, y estamos sumamente agradecidos por sus esfuerzos.

      Continuaremos añadiendo mas artículos en Español siguientemente.
      Por favor anuncienles estas noticias a sus amigos y ayuden a promovernos en los medios sociales.
      Gracias.


       
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...