Jump to content
Trópico

2012 Biennial of the IPS - Part 1: South Thailand Pre-Tour

Recommended Posts

Trópico

Endless rows of gum tree can be seen on either side of the road. It's amazing how perfectly straight they are planted. Note the slash and the cup underneath to pick the gum. Our guide explained to us how they achieved straight vertical growth by planting closer together then later on removing every other from the line. Sometimes they use the grounds below for pineapple plantations.

DSC02121.jpg

DSC02123.jpg

DSC02124.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC00064.jpg

If not gum tree, then oil palm is planted instead. Thailand is the third producer of palm oil, the first two being Indonesia and Malaysia. Oil palm production in Thailand is concentrated mostly in the southern provinces and small land holders produce about 80% of the total oil production.

DSC02126.jpg

Part of the Ton Tok waterfall system.

DSC02127.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

1:40 PM: Location: Ton Tok Waterfall, Palian, Trang.

Some South Thai background music:

We arrived at our first destination of the Biennial Pre-Tour. Since our flight was delayed according to the itinerary, we had to do some last minute changes to our schedule. This resulted in not being able to go to Na Khao Sia Village to see Metroxylon sagu :crying: and see the locals make sagu powder. Other than that, we did not have to cancel any other destinations for the rest of the Pre-Tour.

Members enter the park, which consists of a trail system interconnecting two main waterfalls: Ton Tae waterfall (post #42, last picture above) and Ton Tok (below). Ton Tae drops 320 meters and is called "king of waterfalls" in the area, while Ton Tok is a smaller one with a natural swimming pool at the bottom (with no leeches!).

DSC00066.jpg

DSC02129.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02130.jpg

We stopped to admire this large Arenga species.

DSC02131.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Wooden bridges interconnect the path when small streams interrupt, which offers a good vantage point for both video or photos.

DSC00067.jpg

DSC02134.jpg

DSC02135.jpg

DSC02137.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

A Caryota in habitat, possibly Caryota mitis.

DSC02140.jpg

Slowly but relatively quickly we made it to our destination, Ton Tok Waterfall.

DSC00068.jpg

DSC00069.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The advantages of photo ranch hands: I can be in the pictures!

DSC00071.jpg

DSC02145.jpg

DSC02147.jpg

th_M4H02146.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Ton Tok Waterfall is truly spectacular, especially during the rainy season. Swimming is probably better during non rainy season.

Ton Tok's location in the Trang province:

TonTok_zpse5631bfd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Thai scooters are an alternative to hiking, even over the flimsy wooden bridges.

DSC02154.jpg

Upon return to the park's entrance we were treated with fresh Thai fruits. From left to right, bananas (do I have to tell you which?), langsat (in the bunches up front), rambutan (red hairy thingies), longan (loose bunch, behind), durian (spiky large fruit and cut fruit in the front), watermelon (the large red one that the guy is holding, with black seeds).

DSC00075.jpg

DSC02157.jpg

Very fresh rambutan. Delicious!

DSC02158.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Langsat's innards.

DSC02159.jpg

Cover your noses and say "ah!" Delicious durian. As our guide told us: "Costs like gold, tastes like heaven, smells like hell".

DSC02160.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Hi Frank, the coverage is amazing! We also had a Korean Air flight (which was 13 hours from Los Angeles!), but we even had the same meal...BaBimPa, or something like that. The pre tour looks great and the palms look great too, if you like that sort of thing!

I had the best time in Thailand and your pictures made me want to go back. I hope we meet again sometime.

best regards to you and your wife,

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle

Frank,

The palm with the white fruit is Iguanura. Possibly I. tenuis, because of the white fruit. Unless it's some other species from Malaysia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RainForestt Robert

Frank,,

Thank you very much for the excellent coverage. Looking forward to more :yay: :yay: :yay: .

Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

"Infusions from this leaf make me happy..." Ok, really I don't remember what he was saying, and I came late just in time to snap the picture, but not catch a word of what those leaves are and what for. If anyone knows, please post.

DSC02161.jpg

Pollo asado!

DSC00076.jpg

Members sought cover after getting bottled water from the guides, just as the rain began to pick up pace.

DSC00077.jpg

IPS Director Don Martin gets a towel from wife Heather just as member Dan Ashley (KONADANTOM) packs his green poncho.

DSC02162.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02163.jpg

Buses turned around, all ready to go.

DSC02164.jpg

"You must not be taller than this to enter..." Ok, not likely, but interesting gate.

DSC02165.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02166.jpg

25 minutes or so after we arrived at the fruit reception, IPS Director Grant Stephenson (palm a grant it) arrived all of a sudden, and dripping wet. He posed for a picture while members made funny comments about it. He was the only one to cross the river and venture very close to the waterfall. His passport survived, and probably his camera too.

DSC02167.jpg

Caryota mitis. As if somebody purchased it at their local Home Depot and planted it there. But no, this is an habitat photo!

DSC02168.jpg

"Happy room, anyone?"

DSC02169.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Ton Tae waterfall behind a pair of Areca catechu.

DSC02171.jpg

3:27 PM: Finally was time to hit the road.

DSC02172.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

4:00 PM: Location: Peninsular Botanic Garden (Thung Khai), Yan Ta Khao, Trang, Thailand

DSC02173.jpg

Located in the Thung Khai District (approximately 10 km south of the provincial capital of Trang), the Peninsular Botanical Garden was established in 1993 upon the suggestion of the Prime Minister Chuan Leekphai, who wished to have a botanical garden of international standard and to promote research in Peninsular Thailand. It is located in Thung Khai Arboretum, which is part of the Thung Khai Forest Reserve.

ThungKhai.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

They have some of the best Licuala peltata var. sumawongii

DSC02174.jpg

DSC02175.jpg

DSC02176.jpg

Just behind the auditorium building they planted this nice Licuala peltata var. sumawongii forest.

DSC02177.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

A Livistona, possibly rotundifolia.

DSC02179.jpg

The Licuala forest above, under heavy paparazzi fire.

DSC02180.jpg

DSC02181.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

4:13 PM: The IPS Pre-Tour sat on the auditorium to watch an introductory documentary about the Peninsular Botanic Garden.

DSC02183.jpg

DSC02184.jpg

Possibly outdated or incomplete list of BG in Thailand.

DSC02186.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Nenga pumila in habitat was a frequent sight in these parts.

DSC02188.jpg

Borassodendron machadonis

DSC00080.jpg

DSC02193.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The trail out of the auditorium and deep into the woods led us to the palm collection and eventually to the canopy walk.

DSC02189.jpg

DSC02190.jpg

Just climb over here, and up there it is, the canopy walk! (for non people primates, maybe)

DSC02191.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Arenga

DSC02192.jpg

The walk was relatively very easy.

DSC00081.jpg

Itaya amicorum

DSC00082.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Livistona, but which one?

DSC00083.jpg

Just beginning to trunk, but they can be tall!

DSC00084.jpg

A dwarfish Areca catechu.

DSC02195.jpg

Our guide showing us the underside of a leaf of Kerriodoxa elegans.

DSC02196.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC00085.jpg

Itaya amicorum

DSC02199.jpg

Members were given the privilege to leave a forever impression, by planting (we guessed) Licuala spinosa seedlings.

DSC02201.jpg

DSC02203.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

This will look really nice in a few years

DSC02204.jpg

Cruz de malta

DSC02206.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Salacca zalacca is cultivated in Thailand for its delicious fruit. This clustering, subterranean trunk palm is so spiny that it impales everything that touches it.

DSC02207.jpg

DSC02208.jpg

A closeup of the leaflets, pictured only at the correct angle and focus, reveals yet another level of spines on its leaflets. This palm is only for the adventurous grower.

DSC02209.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

DSC02210.jpg

Its native cousin, Salacca wallichiana, has a much more interesting leaflet arrangement and is significantly larger overall. We saw it growing abundantly in many of the parks we visited.

DSC02211.jpg

DSC02212.jpg

DSC02214.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Leaves of Caryota bacsonensis.

DSC02222.jpg

4:43 PM: The group eventually reached the 175m long and 18m high Canopy Walkway.

DSC00089.jpg

DSC02224.jpg

DSC00091.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The evergreen tropical forest has four distinctive layers. The lowest is the Forest Floor Layer which is home to 4-12m tall trees, small plants, grass and mushrooms that only two per cent of sunlight can penetrate. It is inhabited by creatures big and small, as well as insects.

At 15-20 metres above the ground is the Under Storey Layer where only 2-15 per cent of sunlight can penetrate. It has bushes and small trees, birds, squirrels, butterflies, gecko, snakes and insects.

DSC02229.jpg

After climbing to another level, looking back to where I came walking from. At 21-30m, is the Canopy Layer which boasts large trees with thick foliage like mersawa (krabak), hopea (takian) and Resak tembaga (khiam). Around half of all plant species in this world belong to this layer. It is where animals such as birds, flying lemurs, squirrels, slow loris and insects, live.

DSC02231.jpg

DSC02232.jpg

Caryota

DSC02234.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Stairs to yet another level

DSC02235.jpg

DSC02237.jpg

From the highest bridge

DSC02242.jpg

The highest, called the Emergent Layer, is 31-40m above the ground. It comprises the tallest trees, which include mersawa (krabak) and Dipterocarpus gracilis (yang manmu) that can withstand heat and strong winds. It is home to bats, squirrels, flying lemurs, birds and insects.

DSC02244.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walter John

magic..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

The Canopy Walkway allows for a better view of Salacca wallichiana's nice copperish new leaf.

DSC02249.jpg

These look like Calamus seedlings.

DSC02252.jpg

Calamus stem.

DSC02255.jpg

DSC02257.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

On the way back, the climbing tree with odd corkscrew shape

DSC02270.jpg

Arenga hookeriana

DSC02271.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Trópico

Nenga pumila has a formidable yellow crownshaft. It is closely related to Pinanga, hence the similarly sounding genus name.

DSC02280.jpg

DSC02281.jpg

DSC02282.jpg

DSC02283.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair
      On PT I see all the stunning photos and descriptions of past and future travel with the International Palm Society. 
      Here’s the group of us on the unforgettable Sarawak, Borneo pre tour in 2016.

      I recall times I almost did not sign up due to time, family and work constraints and costs involved.
      However every time it is only the trips I missed that I regret.
      And the friendships I have made across the world are at least as important as the sights and experiences.
      I took my first IPS trip using hoarded airline points through a country I had to find on a map (Qatar) to a place of my dreams (Thailand) in 2012, based primarily on comments by Palm Talk users I had never met.
      I am asking all of you now who have traveled anywhere on an IPS sponsored trip to post why you loved your trip(s). 
      Photos always welcome, but not required. 
    • SW_FL_Palms
      By SW_FL_Palms
      IPS has posted it's pre & post tours.   Unfortunately, the do not go to areas where you can see the Spiny Forest, Succulents,  Baobabs.  Of course, it is the palm society so they are focused on palms.
      Is there anyone out there that would like to join us on Madagascar tour that would take us to see the iconic plants that I listed above ?   A tour company will customize. and provide a quote    So let me know if you are interested, and preference for either before or after the biennial in Reunion.   
       
    • Tracy S
      By Tracy S
      I understand the 2020 IPS Biennial will be held in Reunion Island. Do we have firm dates yet? When will the travel details be available?
       
    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair
      I have been asked to post this notice from the IPS to add to your options for charitable giving.  
    • Cindy Adair
      By Cindy Adair

      Por favor entren al sitio electronico del IPS (palms.org) and dirijasen a "Palms Current Year" para ver que ahora nosotros tenemos traducciones al español de artículos selectos.

      Cliqueen en el vinculo "Leer en Español"  para ver estos artículos (completos con fotos y titulos) traducidos al español.

      Las traducciones han sido verificadas y mejoradas por miembros de la junta directiva del IPS - compuesta por Fernando Pacho Roca y Paco Marti, y estamos sumamente agradecidos por sus esfuerzos.

      Continuaremos añadiendo mas artículos en Español siguientemente.
      Por favor anuncienles estas noticias a sus amigos y ayuden a promovernos en los medios sociales.
      Gracias.


       
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...