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Ken Johnson

Alicehunter2000's Beach Party by Ken Johnson

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Mark Heath

A beautiful Copernicia Alba being installed right next to the pool!

More pics will come!

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Tampa Scott

Thanks for the pictures Mark. Can't wait for the finished look of the landscape project. This landscape will have a instant mature look when finished.

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Mark Heath

Thanks for the pictures Mark. Can't wait for the finished look of the landscape project. This landscape will have a instant mature look when finished.

You are welcome Scott.

Davids' yard went from a dry sandy empty lot to a palmy landscape in no time! I too can't wait to see the finished project, gonna be unreal!

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Alicehunter2000

Wow, Mark can't believe you drove all the way back, downloaded pictures, and posted, with one hand half cut off! :bemused: I'm really impressed!

I am downloading pics to the computer now. Watered, and did some soil grooming this a.m, finished off oysters and took nap.

That big mule is a real beauty! We leaned it about 35 degrees toward the pool to give it a nice eventual curve. The alba that Ken brought has a solid limestone rock rootball.

A great team for the installation :greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb: :greenthumb:

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WestCoastGal

David and crew, nice job! Great crane/mule shot...looks like it's floating in a sea of blue water. Been checking in every once in a while to see if any photos were posted. I figured everyone would be sleeping in late. :-) Mark must have had a lot of coffee in him. Appreciated the early pics though!

Edited by WestCoastGal

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Alicehunter2000

Thanks, WCG .... hopefully you can use the info for your project as well.

Here is a panaramic view of the truck arriving at 6:30 am. Willie, the driver from Fishbranch, was very helpful, and was there right on time. The guy and girl manning the shovels were hired from Labor Ready and were on the ball as well. Everyone was excited to see the palms in the ground!post-97-0-54791200-1365376769_thumb.jpg

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Alicehunter2000

I'm going to post a few more of the truck arriving and try to give everyone a sense of the timeline for the installation process.post-97-0-62482600-1365379015_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-30192200-1365378944_thumb.jpgpost-97-0-23477500-1365379060_thumb.jpg

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Alicehunter2000

Here is the first palm going in the ground.....a high flying 25 ft. W. robusta......post-97-0-67959500-1365380162_thumb.jpg

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Alicehunter2000

The Washie was my test.........Ken wanted to see me under pressure.....at least that's what I was thinking.....why else would he just be taking a nap..........

In all fairness, Ken was actually standing in the middle of the house in line of site with both me and the crane operator so we could signal the operator to the hole.............yes that's right..........the crane guy could not see anything! ......and don't forget the power lines just off the back fence.

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I'm glad we all had our coffee.......should be fully awake doing this!

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Trópico

Amazing! Keep the pics coming!

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_Keith

Keep the pictures coming. You have done in a day, what many of us take 5 to 10 years to accomplish.

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Alicehunter2000

Ok, 2 more before bed.............this Livistonia saribus is a beautiful tree and was unloaded to the side early in the process. Here is Ken directing the crane operator/owner (Randy) from R&R Crane Service to drop the palm down in the front for later install. Look at the teeth on those petioles! :bemused:

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WestCoastGal

How did you get so lucky to have what? 6 utility lines going in a vertical plane on your nearby utility pole! What a nightmare for trees growing nearby. I assume everything went in okay without incident but curious if you think you will have issues with trimming at a later date.

That was some crane you had and that 25 ft Washy s-u-r-e looked tall. Did you have a crowd outside on the street watching the install? We still can't get over how sandy your soil is.

Hey, just watching Vanilla Ice now as I'm posting and they are doing their palm landscaping and tiki setup episode. Ice had some problems with his curved coconut palm installation that was angled in the sandy soil. Needed to anchor it since it started falling into the water. I don't envy you guys who have to dig holes in the sand.

Looking forward to more pics.

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Ken Johnson

I got in just before midnight. About 13 hours driving and the total miles for the trip? 1500 miles!

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Mark Heath

Here is the L.Saribus being placed, i was glad that i got there in time to see it.

David is directing the crane.

I drank Diet Coke all the way home and was wired for sound!

I cut my finger pretty good shucking oysters (i know, a rookie).

My drive was 10 hours there loaded and Ken was ALOT further away! We all timed our delivery and everything went perfect. David now knows how to fly a crane and install big palms!

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Mark Heath

Here is a rare sight! David sitting down after we dragged a huge Pony Tail Palm in a plant dolly all the way into the back of the property through sugar sand.

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Mark Heath

Another cool shot. A P.Sylvestris flying high! This joker is a monster.

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Mark Heath

Here is a buddy of mine (Mark Barnett) that helped me deliver. He drove the 4ft ct Mule and the 3ft ct Mule w/ his truck.

He earned that frosty beverage!!

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Mark Heath

Here is the Sylvestris being placed.

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spockvr6

Finishing touches!

David Simms is on the right in the orange Alice cooper shirt. He wore that shirt so the palmtalk peeps would know who he is!!

I can quite make out what the cool palm is on the far left of this photo with the pink tag on it.........is that S. amara?

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Mark Heath

Finishing touches!

David Simms is on the right in the orange Alice cooper shirt. He wore that shirt so the palmtalk peeps would know who he is!!

I can quite make out what the cool palm is on the far left of this photo with the pink tag on it.........is that S. amara?

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It is not a S.Amara. It is a beautiful Queen specimen. I even commented on that particular palm as well!

S.Amara would not make it that far north

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Xerarch

Finishing touches!

David Simms is on the right in the orange Alice cooper shirt. He wore that shirt so the palmtalk peeps would know who he is!!

I can quite make out what the cool palm is on the far left of this photo with the pink tag on it.........is that S. amara?

post-518-0-65683600-1365364010_thumb.jpg

It is not a S.Amara. It is a beautiful Queen specimen. I even commented on that particular palm as well!

S.Amara would not make it that far north

And so many people here are hate'n on queens all the time, that one looks really nice.

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spockvr6

Finishing touches!

David Simms is on the right in the orange Alice cooper shirt. He wore that shirt so the palmtalk peeps would know who he is!!

I can quite make out what the cool palm is on the far left of this photo with the pink tag on it.........is that S. amara?

post-518-0-65683600-1365364010_thumb.jpg

It is not a S.Amara. It is a beautiful Queen specimen. I even commented on that particular palm as well!

S.Amara would not make it that far north

Incredible. I dont recall seeing one that looked that nice.

I was suspucious of amara in the Panhandle, but with the Gulf that close thought maybe someone got adventuresome :-) Ive been down that road a few times......LOL

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Trópico

Every palm looks its best, Ken sure grows high quality material. I particularly like those Livistona decora, the trunks, boot color and the pruning pattern rivals Phoenix sylvestris. Did the Dypsis make it into the pool planter yet?

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Alicehunter2000

The Dypsis cabadae and C. macrocarpa have been left under some of the other trees with a huge pile of sand on the rootballs. They will have to be installed when the pool is a little further along....just trying to keep them wet and out of the sun as much as possible.

Here was the most scary palm to install, the tree is much bigger than it looks. The weight of the Sabal causiarum was around 5K lbs and the crane had a lot of difficulty reaching across over 100 ft. to place it. Ken powow'd with the operator who agreed to first sit it near the pool which was closer to 50 ft.

Then we were going to slowly work it laterally between some already planted palms. When he attempted to do so, three of the outriggers got real light and shifted the whole machine. Our crane operator almost walked away from the job. Ken talked him into staying and working out a plan of attack.

We then re-positioned the crane and outriggers 10 more feet laterally across the front of the house which got him 10 more feet closer to the hole. He was right up against the front porch of the house...with not an inch to spare. This was just enough to get him close so we could push and swing it into the hole..............VERY stressfull :blink::blink: .....even the heavier Phoenix was not as bad because we were able to place it in the woods then pluck it out and put it into a much closer hole. I learned alot about cranes very quickly.

I'm glad my next-door neighbors were not at home, they would have been freaking.

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sonoranfans

The Dypsis cabadae and C. macrocarpa have been left under some of the other trees with a huge pile of sand on the rootballs. They will have to be installed when the pool is a little further along....just trying to keep them wet and out of the sun as much as possible.

Here was the most scary palm to install, the tree is much bigger than it looks. The weight of the Sabal causiarum was around 5K lbs and the crane had a lot of difficulty reaching across over 100 ft. to place it. Ken powow'd with the operator who agreed to first sit it near the pool which was closer to 50 ft.

Then we were going to slowly work it laterally between some already planted palms. When he attempted to do so, three of the outriggers got real light and shifted the whole machine. Our crane operator almost walked away from the job. Ken talked him into staying and working out a plan of attack.

We then re-positioned the crane and outriggers 10 more feet laterally across the front of the house which got him 10 more feet closer to the hole. He was right up against the front porch of the house...with not an inch to spare. This was just enough to get him close so we could push and swing it into the hole..............VERY stressfull :blink::blink: .....even the heavier Phoenix was not as bad because we were able to place it in the woods then pluck it out and put it into a much closer hole. I learned alot about cranes very quickly.

I'm glad my next-door neighbors were not at home, they would have been freaking.

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Wow David, all those great specimens, fantastic! Looks like you guys had a hard job, bet the beer was welcome. That 5000lb+ causiarum is a real beast, Im sure you next door neighbor would have had serious anxiety watching, LOL! Good thing it wasnt planted indoors at his house by accident.... :floor: I look forward to seeing it all when its done!

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WestCoastGal

David, given the size of the palms and despite how good your crane guy and crew were, I'm not the least bit surprised there were tense moments. I thought I noticed the crane right up to the front of the house in one of the early photos. Figured it was going to be tight. Those palms were giants. If I were there onsite I probably wouldn't have any nails left :-). I have to admit I was pretty nervous when our two mules were craned and we had a lot more side yard and no over-the-house lifting either. It was something fascinating to watch though and I won't forget it. Lots of admiration for the skill of the crane guy. It really is dangerous work and they earn their pay. Glad no one got hurt.

Hey, you've got some great palms there. In particular I liked the L saribus and the P sylvestris. Beautiful trunks and canopies on both. Can't wait to see that giant S causiarum and the rest in the ground when all is said and done. From the glimpse of the house in some of the photos things look like they are moving along. What's your next major hurdle?

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Jastin

Looking great! Your soil looks like pure beach sand. Do you amend with anything When planting?

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Mark Heath

Here is the second Mule to go into the ground. Don Martin is hooking it up.

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Mark Heath

And here it is flying.

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Mark Heath

Home at last!!

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Mark Heath

3rd Mule to in the front. Ken and David guide the crane operator to it's final home.

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Mark Heath

David and I are positioning it just right w/ a little angle to curve it away from the house.

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redant

Thats a lot of instant gratification you got there. You picked some great palms and they all look super healthy.

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_Keith

Here is the L.Saribus being placed, i was glad that i got there in time to see it.

David is directing the crane.

I drank Diet Coke all the way home and was wired for sound!

I cut my finger pretty good shucking oysters (i know, a rookie).

My drive was 10 hours there loaded and Ken was ALOT further away! We all timed our delivery and everything went perfect. David now knows how to fly a crane and install big palms!

That saribus is plain danged gawdgeous. I am so jealous.

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redbeard917

That's got to be one of the nicest P. sylvestris I've ever seen. The whole project looks great.

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Ken Johnson

I have been waiting for all of this to sort of sink in before I posted to much of my story. Planning for a job for 6 months was one thing but the execution of these types of jobs must be perfect or else the costs really skyrocket. The game was on!

David was the ultimate "do it yourself" contractor. His hard work and investigative skills paid off time and time again. David found Fishbranch nursery and the crane service. He and I interviewed several potential installers but in the end decided to " do it on our own". Many of you that commented here on PalmTalk gave us ideas that we were able to throw around and we both thank all of you for that!

The install WAS intense, whenever you see the crane outriggers lift off the ground you know it's going to get interesting! At lunch time I was looking for some hot dogs or a sub and there was no way to leave or even stop to ask....then came the next smart idea i had for the day...oysters. Now eating 35 raw oysters for lunch is not the MOST well rounded meal but the horseradish and tomato sauce counted for fruits and vegetables right?

When it was all over David and I could hardly walk..Good thing we both have fast trucks because we raced home to Davids house where Evana, David's lovely wife and our gracious hostess, served us some water....and food. We had been at it for about 14 hours by that point and the next day I would drive 13 hours to get home! Florida is a LONG State!

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WestCoastGal

How's Mark's hand doing? Those oyster shucking knives scare me.

I bet you guys were exhausted by the end of the install and then knowing you had a drive in front of you. As someone who has enjoyed seeing the photos of the palms going in, want to say thanks to you, Mark and David for taking the time to post them.

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_Keith

Many people in Cajun country now wear a single Kevlar glove in holding hand. Pretty much every fishing related store down here sells them.

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Alicehunter2000

Hey everyone, have been busy bracing the trees for possible bad weather and have also started back to work. Been trying to water deep everyday....so haven't had much time to post....will try and post more this weekend. Anyway, here is more pictures. We installed 3 Livistonia decora...........these have a great papery base at the petiole, very interesting.

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