Jump to content
trioderob

recommended "10 palm garden" - bullet proof or exotic........

Recommended Posts

trioderob

so what this thread is about is picking 10 palms - for YOUR area only.

(lets say your best friend saw your garden fell in love with palms and gave you a blank check

3 ways it could go:

1) a list of palms that are bullet proof in your area and make a perfect garden

(such as Jubs and DD in southern cal)

2) a list of collector palms that are rare in your area and would be impressive to other collectors.

3) a mix of palms from the above

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bahia

Where I live, it seldom gets either too hot or cold, so palms that grow well without real heat have been my personal favorites. My list of palms in my own garden include Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Chamaedorea plumosa/costaricana/tepelijote/microspadix, Rhopalostylis baueri v. cheesemanii, Trachycarpus martianus, Howeia forsterianum, Brahea 'Clara' and Chamaerops humilis v. cerifera. All of these are pretty dependable here in Berkeley, but I do have to worry about damage to the Howeia in the occasional once a decade drop into the mid 20's °F for a night or two. Most winters only see lows to 29°F or so, and little damage with all the canopy my garden has.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Justin

For my area:

Jubaea chilensis

Parajubaea cocoides

Chambeyronia macrocarpa

Ravenea glauca

Howea forsteriana

Dypsis onilahensis

Butia capitata

Archontophoenix maxima

Dypsis decipiens

Cocoid crosses

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John Case

Using approach #2 in my area

1) Beccariophoenix alfredii

2) Chambeyronia macrocarpa

3) Chambeyronia hookeri

4) Howea forsteriana

5) Howea belmorenana

6) Jubeaea chiliensis

7) Bismarckia nobilis

8) Chaemadorea radicalis (arborescent form)

9) Chaemadorea metallica

10) Dypsis decepiens

Most of these would grow easily on SoCal, requires a little more thinking and placement in my 9b area with winter lows of 24-5 and summer highs of 110+...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stevetoad

My garden is to young to know what's bulletproof yet. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmsOrl

For my area, the northern burbs of Orlando, I will list four bullet-proof palms (not including natives), four rare/exotic palms that are risky but really cool and two that may fit into both categories:

Bullet-proof - Phoenix species; tend to do really well here and may become weedy, though sometimes subject to disease

Washingtonia robusta; bullet-proof, rarely succumbs to disease or occasional lightning strike (when very tall)

Syagrus romanzoffiana; grows very well here and may become very weedy, somewhat disease prone

Livistona chinensis; grows well, leaves sometimes appear ratty and sun-burnt

Rare/Exotic - Ptychosperma macarthurii - worth a try in the city/suburbs in a sheltered spot

Areca triandra - same as the above, definitely the most cold hardy Areca species

Wodyetia bifurcata - featured in city plantings in recent years, may survive long-term in warmer spots of town

Veitchia arecina - fast growing and very tropical looking, may live for a number of years but not forever

Both - Roystonea regia - may get killed in 50 or 100 year freezes, but with expanding urbanization, is a long-term survivor in the city and near suburbs, best bet is to begin with a trunking specimen

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana - same as for R. regia, my specimen (unprotected) was 10% burnt by 25F low, many sub-freezing nights and heavy frost, remarkably hardy and tropical looking

I could add many more, but I want to keep my list to 10.

Edited by palmsOrl
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quaman58

My garden is to young to know what's bulletproof yet. :(

Gee Steve, I would guess that anything that lives beyond a month or so at your place is bullet proof.

Your friend,

Bret

(sorry, that was too easy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trioderob

ya this is cool

the tread now has the right vibe going...............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff

Reliable: Parajubaea sunkha, Bismarckia, Chamaerops var. argentea, Livistona fulva, Hyphaene coriacea, Wallichia disticha, Copernicia gigas, Trachycarpus princeps, Chuniophoenix nana, Ravenea glauca

Exotic (might make it we have a lot of 'good years' in a row): Hyphaene petersiana, Dypsis ambositrae, Wodyetia x Veitchia, Dypsis prestoniana, Sabal yapa, Rhopalostylis baueri, Hedeyscepe, Dypsis decaryi x leptocheilos, Archontophoenix myolensis, Chambeyronia (any)

(I have lost or nearly lost most of those on this list... so I sort of wish I could try them again)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stevetoad

My garden is to young to know what's bulletproof yet. :(

Gee Steve, I would guess that anything that lives beyond a month or so at your place is bullet proof.

Your friend,

Bret

(sorry, that was too easy)

Oh, in that case...washingtonia......and crab grass :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicgardener

My area is warm humid subtropical (bordering on tropical) but does suffer from long spells without rain. With this in mind a few 'selected' palms that are bulletproof for this area include:

Cocos nucifera

Roystonea regia

Adonidia merrillii

Wodyetia bifurcata

Dypsis lutescens (way too common)

Pychosperma elegans (locally native)

Livistona decora (locally native)

Veitchia arecina

Bismarkia nobilis

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

Another very common palm here is Archontophoenix alexandrae (locally native along streams) but is not included because it is not bulletproof if planted in a dry spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennybenjamin

I get to cheat a bit because Andrew (post #11) has already mentioned some of the more common palms around these parts so I get to just add more to his list, the following are some of the hardier sp. that I can think of that are a little exotic / rarer

Dypsis pembana

Dypsis baronii

Kentiopsis oliviformis

Chamaedorea metallica

Arenga australasica

Beccariophoenix sp. "windows"

Chamaedorea tepijilote

Gausia maya

Rhapis excelsa

Allergoptera arenaria

On reflection this was harder than I thought to add to the list, I have intentionally tried to spread the "load" between genuses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eric in Orlando

This first list is for the colder locations of the metro Orlando area;

Allagoptera arenaria

Arenga engleri

Brahea clara

Chamaedorea microspadix

Copernicia alba

Livistona nitida

Livistona saribus

Phoenix loureiroi

Rhapis multifida

Sabal bermudana

This list is for the warmer sections of the metro Orlando area (downtown, Winter Park, etc.)

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

Areca triandra

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Caryota gigas/obtusa

Dypsis baronii

Licuala spinosa

Livistona jenkinsiana

Phoenix rupicola

Pinanga coronata

Roystonea regia

Sabal mauritiiformis

Syagrus coronata

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmnutVN

The first 10 are palms that are grown everywhere....and are almost weed like, if I am permitted to blaspheme by using the word 'palm' and 'weed' in the same sentence!

1. Wodyetia bifurcata

2. Roystonea regia

3. Hyophorbe lagenicaulis

4. Cyrtostachys renda

5. Vast array of Cocos varieties

6. Elaeis guinieensis

7. Areca triandra

8. Chamadorea seifrizii

9. Nypa fruticans

10.Bismarkia noblis

These 10 palms have done really well here since I started growing/cultivating them:

1. Dypsis cabadae

2. Pritchardia thurstonii

3. Euterpe oleracea

4. Dypsis leptocheilos

5. Salacca zalacca

6. Livistona decipiens

7. Sabal minor

8. Dictyosperma album

9. Normanbya normanbyi

10.Latania verschaffeltii

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zeeth

Copernicia macroglossa

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Roystonea regia

Sabal mauritiformis

Kentiopsis oliviformis

Cocos nucifera Panama tall

Chambeyronia macrocarpa

Borassus flabellifer

Dypsis saintelucei

Wodveitchia

These are the palms I would chose for my area in Sarasota.

Most of them are hardy long term except possibly the coconut, and I've heard the Borassus is damaged easily when young but seems to build hardiness with age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sarasota alex

  • Licuala peltata var. sumawongii
  • Copernicia fallaensis
  • Corypha umbraculifera
  • Borassus aethiopum
  • Cocos nucifera
  • Attalea cohune
  • Chambeyronia macrocarpa
  • Kentiopsis magnifica
  • Pinanga philippinensis
  • Carpoxylon macrospermum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Hmm.

I don't see any point in keeping down to just 10 (get small plants and alternate canopy):

1. Dypsis baronii

2. Dypsis ambositrae

3. Dypsis plumosa

4. Dypsis onilahensis

5. Dypsis saintluciei

6. Dypsis arenarius

7. Dypsis lanceolata

8. Caryota gigas (if room)

9. Arenga engleri

10. Caryota mitis

11. Chambeyronea

12. Parajubaea (all)

13. Chamadorea ernest-augustii, metallica, hooperiana, geonomiformis

14. Wallichia disticha

15. Wallichia densiflora

16. Roystonea borenquenia

17. Dypsis leptocheilos

18. Archontophoenix tuckeri

19. Arch. myolensis

20. Arch. purpurea

21. Pritchardtia (all the Hawaiians)

22. Ravenea glauca

PANT PANT PANT PANT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Blank check? Why stop?

Howea forsteriana, belmoriana

Actinokentia divaricata

Rhopalistylus sapida & baueri and the various subspecies

Hedyscepe

Trithrinax

Euterpe edulis

Dypsis psammophila

Hyophorbe indica (pref red)

Rhapis humilis, and all the rest

Beccariophoenix alfredii and no window

so many

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

This is supposed to be a bullet-proof list . . .

Here's some I'd leave off:

Roystonea oleracea

Dypsis crinita

Dypsis decipiens

Dypsis decaryi

Ravenea sambirinensis

Ceroxylon (all)

Jauania australis

Lepidorrachis

Beccariophoenix window

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

For my area I'm choosing 10 palm species that I can enjoy with minimal angst as I get older

1. Dypsis pembana

2. Sabal palmetto Lisa

3. Kentiopsis oliviformis

4. Chamaedorea klotzchiana

5. Rhapis sp unknown

6. Livistona jenkinsiana

7. Chamaedorea oblongata

8. Dypsis sp Malagasy

9. Dypsis sp Dwarf

10. Copernicia alba

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eric in Orlando

South FL and the warmer parts of central FL should be growing Clinostigma savoryanum. Seems to be reasonable cool/cold tolerant, Should grow well where ever Archontophoenix and Wodyetia do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

South FL and the warmer parts of central FL should be growing Clinostigma savoryanum. Seems to be reasonable cool/cold tolerant, Should grow well where ever Archontophoenix and Wodyetia do.

Well, maybe in Florida, but not here in Cali. They don't like the long cool of winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rprimbs

Here are ten palms that grow here that I think are just plain cool (In no particular order)

1 Bismarkia nobilis

2 Caryota gigas

3 Dypsis decipiens

4 Beccariophoenix alfredii

5 Howea forsteriana

6 Chambeyronia hookeri

7 Jubaea chilensis

8 Roystonia regia

9 Rhopalostylis sapida

10 Hedyscepe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

I think this is going to be a really great reference thread for years to come. Save.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sutter Bob

Bulletproof here:

Phoenix canariensis

Washingtonia filifera

Washingtonia robusta

Syagrus romanzoffiana

Chamaerops humilis (both forms)

Brahea armata, clara

Trachycarpus fortunei

Butia odorata

Chamaedorea radicalis

Worth a try

Dypsis decipiens (cover in winter)

Beccariophoenix alfredii (cover in winter)

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana (cover as long as you can)

Arenga micrantha (cover)

Phoenix roebellini (cover in winter), dactylifera (probably bulletproof as ornamental), rupicola

Jubaea chilensis (probably bulletproof)

Sabal minor, uresana (probably bulletproof)

Parajubaea

Mule

Trouble but consider

Kentiopsis oliviformis

Ravenea rivularis

Ravenea glauca

Ravenea xerophila

Oraniopsis appendiculata (give it cover)

Bismarckia nobilis (I've convinced myself it can grow here but I can't figure out how)

Dypsis betafaka

Dypsis baronii

Dypsis onilahensis

Caryota

Apologies for the fuzzy math

I'm sure there are many more..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jakkrit

For my area , these are 10 species in my heart :

1. Foxy lady

2. Orania sylvicola

3. Mauritia flexuosa

4. Gaussia princeps

5. Caryota obtusa

6. Medemia argun

7. Socratea exorrhiza

8. Irriartea deltoidea

9. Kerriodoxa elegans

10. Raphia ruwenzorica

exclude this one :mrlooney:

post-507-0-72445000-1347608212_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Upon thinking further - which I probably shouldn't do - I missed some prime candidates, so ten palms aren't enough.

1a. Coccothrinax argentata

2a. Coccothrinax macroglossa Azul

3a. Coccothrinax scorparia

4a. Beccariophoenix alfredii

5a. Hyphaene thebaica

6a. Neoveitchia storckii

7a. Ravenea xerophila

8a. Kerriodoxa elegans

9a. Chambeyronia macrocarpa + Houialou

10a. Sabal minor Blountstown Dwarf

Oh, and Hemithrinax ekmanii.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom in Tucson

Seem to be "bullet proof" in my area:

Bismarckia

Brahea aculeata, armata, clara, edulis, decumbens, dulcis, nitida, sarukhanii, "super silver"

Chamaerops

Coccothrinax - All species tried do well unless given too much shade. The fastest: hioramii, pseudorigida, and spissa

Copernicia baileyana, rigida

Dypsis decaryi

Livistona lanuginosa, rigida

Parajubaea - Except cocoides

Sabal - all species tried except for bermudana (sunburns) and mauritiiformis (yellows)

Trithrinax campestris

Aren't always "bullet proof", but are worth growing here:

Beccariophoenix - Except sp. "windows"

Copernicia curbeloi, fallaensis, macroglossa

Dypsis decipiens

Jubaea

Jubaeopsis

Livistona saribus

Ravenea glauca, hildebrandtii, rivularis, xerophila

Roystonea borinquena, regia

Thrinax parviflora, radiata

High 104F, Low 64F - dry and windy

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JLeVert

Never fail list: Butia (just about all of them)

Sabal minor, palmetto, bermudana, uresana, rosei, causiarum, 'tamaulipas', mexicana

Trachycarpus fortunei, nanus

Livistona nitida

Nannorhops ritcheana

Serenoa repens

Brahea moorei, decumbens

Chamaerops humilis

Washingtonia filifera, robusta

Chamaedorea microspadix, radicalis

A couple of pictures to show what can be done in Augusta, GA besides playing golf:

DSC_0147-1.jpg

DSC_0146.jpg

DSC_0093.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ghar41

so what this thread is about is picking 10 palms - for YOUR area only.

(lets say your best friend saw your garden fell in love with palms and gave you a blank check

3 ways it could go:

1) a list of palms that are bullet proof in your area and make a perfect garden

(such as Jubs and DD in southern cal)

2) a list of collector palms that are rare in your area and would be impressive to other collectors.

3) a mix of palms from the above

Cool thread! Palms that have proven themselves in mid 20's F in this climate and are rarely planted in this area so response to #3.

1. Dypsis decipiens

2. Parajubaea sunkha

3. Brahea mooreii

4. Trachycarpus wagnerianus

5. Rhapidophylum hystrix

6. Trachycarpus martianus (Khasa Hills)

7. Chamaedorea radicalis (both forms)

8. Brahea nitida

9. Jubaea chilensis

10. cocoid hybrids (all especially Jubaea x Queen and B. oderata x Parajubaea cocoides)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave-Vero

I think a few are getting short shrift: Chambeyronia (incredible genus for tough ornamental palms), Cryosophila warscewiczii, assorted Coccothrinax (Palmatier Meg has a good list), and the Rhapis species, which can make beautiful mounds. My yard has proven good for Archontophoenix; as noted by Tropicgardener, that's a matter of having a fairly moist yard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
monkeyranch

Bulletproof but not common, at least around here (8b/9a). Recommendable for palm novices:

Brahea armata

Butia yatay

xButyagrus nabonnandii

Chamaedorea radicalis (both forms)

Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera or argentea err whatever

Jubaea chilensis (mandatory for all properties of adequate size and climate according to State of CA Public Resources Code)

Rhapidophylum hystrix

Sabal 'Riverside'

S. uresana (slow grower initially)

Trachycarpus latisectus ('Sikkim' if you can find it)

More unusual and maybe more challenging or painfully slow:

Arenga ryukyuensis (hardier than my engleri but by how much?)

Brahea sp. 'Super Silver' (hard to find large ones)

B. nitida

Guihaia agryrata (good luck finding a decent sized one to start with and keep it away from drying winds)

Livistona decora

Nannorhops green or 'Iran Silver' or 'Kashmir'

Parajubaea torallyi microcarpa or P. sunkha or hybrid of, for more dependable hardiness.

Sabal 'Lisa'

Trachycarpus martianus 'Khasia Hills'

Trithinax campestris (slow initially, so you'll want to start with 15gal+)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Clulow

My climate is always hot. If it gets down to 22°C (71°F), I run to find a shirt to put on ! But it rarely gets down to that temp. only in severe tropical storms and then only for a short time. We are very wet, this year exremely so, from June to November and almost no rain (xerophitic) from January to April. These are my cast-iron plants - not a one has been lost in these conditions, and no watering in the dry season other then in the nursery in pots before they are planted out:

Sabal maritima One of my fastest palms

Bismarckia nobilis

Hyphaene coriaceae

Livistona rigida

Dypsis madagascariensis

Dypsis decipiens

Latania loddigesii

Washingtonia robusta Tall very fast

Washingtonia filifera Medium very fast

Anonidia merillii Small The two washingtonias and the Anonidia were sown on the same day and it is interesting to see the huge differences in size

Caryota mitis

Corypha utan

Corypha umbraculifera (rather slow)

Borassus flabillifer

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JasonD

In my fog-belt neighborhood, these are usually happy & beautiful. Every 30 years or so some(*) would be damaged or killed by a sustained freeze.

1. Trachycarpus princeps

2. Rhopalostylis baueri*

3. Trachycarpus martianus

4. Parajubaea sunkha

5. Ceroxylon parvifrons

6. Brahea moorei

7. Chamaedorea costaricana*

8. Hedyscepe canterburyana*

9. Pritchardia minor*

10. Chamaedorea stolonifera*

Bullet-proof--would not be damaged by the worst freeze or would regrow vigorously(*), and great to plant if space is not an issue. Our gardens are very small in San Francisco.

1. Jubaea

2. Parajubaea torallyi v. torallyi

3. Parajubaea cocoides*

4. Brahea edulis

5. Brahea calcarea (nitida)

6. Ceroxylon ventricosum

7. Ceroxylon quindiuense

8. Livistona australis

9. Livistona nitida

10. Rhopalostylis sapida*

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Bulletproof:

  1. Rhapidophyllum Hystrix
  2. Sabal Minor
  3. Sabal Palmetto
  4. Serenoa repens
  5. Acoelorrhaphe Wrightii
  6. Chamaerops Humilis
  7. Rhapis Excelsa
  8. Phoenix Dactylifera
  9. Phoenix Canariensis
  10. Phoenix Theophrasti

At least as far as temperature.  Pests/disease might be another story for the last 3.

Exotics (that are 2009-2010 hardy, but maybe not 1962/1985, 20F hardy):

  1. Bismarckia Nobilis
  2. Roystonea Regia
  3. Beccariophoenix Alfredii
  4. Phoenix Roebelenii
  5. Livistona Chinensis
  6. Archontophoenix Alexandrae
  7. Dypsis Lutescens
  8. Phoenix Rupicola
  9. Phoenix reclinata
  10. Medemia Argun (?)
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matthew92

The usual suspects in my area (Sabal palmetto, saw palmetto, Butia, Washingtonia robusta/hybrid) wouldn't do too much to wow. Although mixed in with a more diverse garden may be nice.

Here's 10 species that should for the most part be 8b hardy yet unusual/exotic here.

1. Mule (Butia x Syagrus r.)

2. Brahea clara

3. Trithrinax a.

4. Sabal causiarum

5. Trachycarpus ukhrulensis

6. Butia x Parajubaea

7. Chamaedorea microspadix

8. Livistona nitida

9. Arenga ryukuensis

10. Chamaedorea radicalis

 

Now here's some that are a little more marginal, but definitely more exotic.

1. Acrocomia totai

2. Livistona decora

3. Livistona mariae

4. Chamaedorea woodsoniana

5. Acoelorrhaphe wrightii

6. Chuniophoenix hainensis

7. Phoenix canariensis or theophratii (the former is common here, but what I'm getting at is a WELL GROWN, well fertilized, properly pruned specimen. Ones around here are mostly small, overpruned, nutrient deficient, and which makes any cold damage worse). 

8. Brahea brandegeei

9. Rhapis excelsa

10. Phoenix hybrid (little bit of reclinata or canariensis in it would be nice)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...