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Jasper B

PLEASE Help: Canary Island Date Palm in trouble???

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Jasper B

Hello everyone, this is my first post. I live in Southern California / North County coastal San Diego. I have many more rare species (more interesting that date palm I mean, which is subject of this post), and started my garden only over last few years. Most palms are growing terribly slow (and are still very small); some staying healthier than others. I thought my Veitchi's could do without a cover this winter (for first time), since they had gotten nice and strong with a good start of a trunk, but they nearly died. Finally recovering a bit. Either way, still to early for me to impress you guys with pics from my other palms.

But, to get to the subject of my post, I have a plain-old Canary island Date Palm, that I bought it very small in 2004 or so, and it have been growing crazy fast, even through the winters. Then, about two years ago, I saw random leaves or parts of leaves turn brown. It tended to disappear, and then came back, and disappeared again.

This time, the leaves turning brown is much more wide-spread, and closer to the core/center where the leaves start. I remember hearing about a disease that killed many of these types of palms in LA area. Does anyone know the trouble with this palm? Is there anything I can do about it? And if not, what developments should I expect? Will it just die a slow death from here? Or might it recover by itself? Otherwise, the palm appears healthy and still growing like usual ...

I included some pictures. The first shows the palm as a whole. At first glance, it looks fine. But the close-up shows two expample leaves that turned brown near the core.

Thanks in advance for suggestions!

post-1867-0-19014500-1340304567_thumb.jppost-1867-0-79278700-1340304576_thumb.jp

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LJG

Do a search here for Fusarium Wilt. Can't tell 100% from iPhone but looks like it to me.

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Jasper B

Thank you for responses ... it looks like it is this disease that will basically kill the palm. The one palm that was doing so well ... Ahhh ...

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Dypsisdean

Hi Jasper,

I believe I may have helped you get started with this palm obsession several years ago when you dropped by my garden on Naiad St. (There aren't that many Jaspers in Encinitas) Sorry to hear about your Canary. But don't be too upset. Look at it as an opportunity to put something even nicer in its place. :)

Read some of the posts here from people in a similar location to you and pick a good palm for your microclimate. BTW - the Palm Society of So. Calif. will be having a garden tour at my Leucadia garden in the last half of July. You could get some ideas there.

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DoomsDave

Hi Jasper,

I believe I may have helped you get started with this palm obsession several years ago when you dropped by my garden on Naiad St. (There aren't that many Jaspers in Encinitas) Sorry to hear about your Canary. But don't be too upset. Look at it as an opportunity to put something even nicer in its place. :)

Read some of the posts here from people in a similar location to you and pick a good palm for your microclimate. BTW - the Palm Society of So. Calif. will be having a garden tour at my Leucadia garden in the last half of July. You could get some ideas there.

Jasper, come to the meeting of the Palm Society of Southern California, on July 21, 2012, at Dean's place.

Here's a website for your perusal

http://www.palmssc.org/index.html

Or, PM me if you have any questions!

Dave PSSC

Mod Edit: Dave is the PSSC President

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Jasper B

Hi Dean and Dave,

Yes Dean, I did visit your garden back several years. And you told me about this site also. Also with two truly terrible summers in cloudy Leucadia, things are growing only really slowly (jealous about this guy in Thailand with garden of only 4.5 years old and already looking unbelievable). I have about 30 varities of palms. Just bought a couple of new ones, but only one new specy. I have gotten a little hesitant about going too edgy, with the weather and struggles for the palms. It is hard for me to see them die nearly every year. As I mentioned, I had some Veitchia's that were developing so well and fast, but always protected by overhead cover. This one winter without the cover almost killed them. I have a Clinostigma under overhead cover now that I am very concerned about if I would let it go without cover. We shall see. It is doing better than I expected so far (as I understand that one is on the edge), but, be it slow, doing pretty nicely. Little or no problems this winter. Dean, how are things with you in Hawaii ... I am sure your garden is getting more and more amazing!

Dave, I am already a member of PSSC and I look forward to join the upcoming meeting in Leucadia. Did not see the flyer yet, but I guess it should be coming soon.

Hope to see you all there ... As for alternate palms, I am open to suggestions. In this spot, I need something that is not too high a risk (no shelter) and will grow into something large and impressive (hopefully without taking too long). I thought of just a majestic palm, but I am open to suggestions. I have none of those, but realize it is nothing special ...

Jasper

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Dypsisdean

Jasper,

Some palms are much better than others for our coastal climate. And then, the microclimate of your own garden's little nooks and crannies is also a factor. The most informative and valuable aspects in joining a local IPS Affiliate is the ability to view the gardens of others trying to grow less than common palms in the same climate of your own. Nothing informs better than a beautiful palm growing in the exact same conditions you can provide it. And the same holds true for a struggling scrawny burnt to a crisp palm. Someone else paid the price and time to show you that species should probably be avoided for your location.

You will see both at my place. :)

And yes, the Hawaiian garden is coming along nicely. Don't hesitate to get in touch if you ever come this way.

And BTW - skip the Majestic. :)

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redant

"And BTW - skip the Majestic. :):" Unless you live in a swamp or want a really big water bill.



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wimmie

Hi Jasper; I have seen this problem in the Mediterranian area. Palms there are treated with chemicals en I have seen there palms surviving the disease and starting a new crown. I would give it a try and ask the local trade for the right chemicals.

Wim.

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Jasper B

Dean, I am leaning now towards Schizolobium with a couple of palms around the base (as replacement). I have already a Schizolobium (in other spot), but this tree seems not to take off. Conditions seem similar to your yard, but I am hearing they need as much sun as possible. I will certainly let you know if we make a next trip to the big island ... thanks for the offer.

Wim, did you know I am from the Netherlands, originally, myself? Are you growing palms in that area, or do have a place or way to be in mediterranian area frequenty? Removing the palm is going to be quite expensive. I am getting quotes, but maybe it would be worth given some chemicals a try. Are you thinking something systemic?

Jasper

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