Jump to content
bgl

Floribunda Palms & Exotics

Recommended Posts

Kim

At the risk of causing further injury, I have a few more photos to add. :winkie: Let's start with an ordinary Dypsis pilulifera, or 'orange crush'. I was hoping to buy a few, but this is not a good choice for an absentee grower as they can be difficult to keep happy when small.

post-216-072793100 1340072959_thumb.jpg

Just in case you were not floored by the size of the Beccariophoenix, here it is again, and another with flowers and seeds:

post-216-049095300 1340073149_thumb.jpg post-216-072230500 1340073177_thumb.jpg

A close-up of the renamed Licuala, Lanonia dasyantha:

post-216-061133700 1340073254_thumb.jpg

Something really cool from Colombia and Ecuador (thanks for the correction), a Geonoma Jeff described as "chocolate"; the name is G. tamandua var. macrostachya. The can grow at least chest high, with big fat leaves; the unusual coloring and leaf texture are remarkable.

post-216-036672400 1340073497_thumb.jpg

Edited by Kim
corrected name
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

When we came upon the Iriartea deltoidea, all I could say was, "OMG! OMG!" These are very tall and very impressive.

post-216-035060500 1340073682_thumb.jpg post-216-066556500 1340073745_thumb.jpg

post-216-059443700 1340073709_thumb.jpg

Some closer shots of the Dypsis leucomalla (fka 'sp. white'). As Jeff describes it, this thing feels like styrofoam. It isn't plant-like. He had rigged up some plastic to keep the recent heavy rains from knocking off the seeds. Jeff's hand on the spear for scale, 4th photo. We're talking Jurassic...

post-216-004287600 1340073916_thumb.jpg post-216-034677000 1340073942_thumb.jpg

post-216-020197800 1340073969_thumb.jpg post-216-045228800 1340073989_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DALION

Folks, this is meant to INSPIRE! :)

It inspires me! Inspires me save some money to buy a little property in Hawaii. So does Leilani Estates need any new neighbors?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

A few more sights you don't see every day, Hydriastele macrocarpa:

post-216-002756600 1340074243_thumb.jpg

Loxococcus rupicola producing seed knee-high off the ground.

post-216-078796900 1340074660_thumb.jpg

What happens when a palm is fertilized heavily, gets lots and lots of rain, then a dry spell:

post-216-037852800 1340074718_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

This Pritchardia viscosa was a delight to photograph, begging your indulgence in multiple pix. :rolleyes:

post-216-049578800 1340074881_thumb.jpg post-216-096949300 1340074906_thumb.jpg

post-216-014430700 1340074934_thumb.jpg

Another lesson for me in trying to identify young Dypsis: on the left, young D. mananjarensis. On the right, more mature D. mananjarensis. They do change as they grow. Oops! Big correction here: Palm on left is not mananjarensis. I bow to the superior ID skills of my forum peers! :) I guess I can't listen and take photos at the same time.

post-216-035362500 1340075063_thumb.jpg post-216-034028600 1340075085_thumb.jpg

Last photo, Bo and Suchin with the truckload of palms. She is smiling because she and Jeff just sold us twice as many palms as we had intended to buy. :lol:

post-216-065483300 1340075204_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

Thanks Kim for more photos. You always take such great photos. That Geonoma tamandua var. macrostachya is something else.

I think the palm is a young Dypsis Hovo, not Mananjarensis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
richnorm

Something really cool from South-east Asia, a Geonoma Jeff described as "chocolate"; the name is G. tamandua var. macrostachya. The can grow at least chest high, with big fat leaves; the unusual coloring and leaf texture are remarkable.

post-216-036672400 1340073497_thumb.jpg

A Geonoma from South-east Asia? I think not but it's flippin' cool anyway!

cheers

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darold Petty

I give up. I will pave over my land with concrete and take up knitting. :mrlooney:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
XYZ

Kim:

More great pics of great plants! I suspect no more space in the truck may be what finally closed the tab?

The Geonoma is from the Colombian Choco and lowland Esmeraldas, Ecuador. Jeff calls them G. tamandua, I prefer G. atrovirens and Andrew Henderson resunk both names into G macrostachys var. macrostachys last year. Leaves to 6' plus. I have a few and consider them one of the world's most beautiful small palms. Michael Calonje of Montgomery has photos of almost jet black wild adults in western Colombia that would cause strong men to faint ;^)

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

Something really cool from South-east Asia, a Geonoma Jeff described as "chocolate"; the name is G. tamandua var. macrostachya. The can grow at least chest high, with big fat leaves; the unusual coloring and leaf texture are remarkable.

post-216-036672400 1340073497_thumb.jpg

A Geonoma from South-east Asia? I think not but it's flippin' cool anyway!

cheers

Richard

I first said it was Iguanura from South America, but I didn't take notes. I frequently mess up names of palms I don't grow yet. People correct me; I learn. :) If it's Geonoma, it's from Central or South America, yes?

Edit: Thanks for the clarification, Jay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

Thanks Kim for more photos. You always take such great photos. That Geonoma tamandua var. macrostachya is something else.

I think the palm is a young Dypsis Hovo, not Mananjarensis.

Maybe I was distracted, but I'm fairly certain both are mananjarensis. There are several all planted together, and Jeff was making the point about how different they can look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Xenon

Amazing! Loved the apple Cyrtostachys and the P. viscosa...:drool:

Dear bgl or Kim,

What is the elevation of this garden?

Thanks for the pics!

:) Jonathan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

Jonathan, I believe the elevation is right around 800 ft.

And Jay, thanks a lot for the additional information! Much appreciated! :)

Bo-Göran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
peachy

Grrrr.... now I want a P. viscosa too. :angry:

Peachy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

I have always been a little stubborn when the facts are in front in front of me... :lol:

I WILL NOT GIVE UP! (There could be room for #2!) :rolleyes:

And I also agree with Lens observation.

Kim, I just realised there is a function on my camera that allows a 5-8 second audio recording after you snap the pic. I don't know if all new cameras have this, but I think it would be handy for "overwhelming PRA's" :D I hope to try mine out soon enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

Thanks Kim for more photos. You always take such great photos. That Geonoma tamandua var. macrostachya is something else.

I think the palm is a young Dypsis Hovo, not Mananjarensis.

Maybe I was distracted, but I'm fairly certain both are mananjarensis. There are several all planted together, and Jeff was making the point about how different they can look.

I guess to clarify why Len and I think that way... D.. hovo's ARE known to change a lot while growing.. BUT the mealybug/mananjarensis has those distinct markings from the first few leaves!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
colin Peters

Thanks for the additional pics Kim. Love the Loxococcos Rupicola, nice to

see that they are seeding and coming full circle for Jeff. I just ordered 12 seedlings from

him, the purplish new leaf is really cool.

aloha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Austin

Thanks Kim for more photos. You always take such great photos. That Geonoma tamandua var. macrostachya is something else.

I think the palm is a young Dypsis Hovo, not Mananjarensis.

Maybe I was distracted, but I'm fairly certain both are mananjarensis. There are several all planted together, and Jeff was making the point about how different they can look.

I guess to clarify why Len and I think that way... D.. hovo's ARE known to change a lot while growing.. BUT the mealybug/mananjarensis has those distinct markings from the first few leaves!

To help there are two D.man. and a D. hov .planted to the side of them were Kim is taking this shot so it would to get them mixed upblink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kennybenjamin

Folks, this is meant to INSPIRE! :)

It inspires me! Inspires me save some money to buy a little property in Hawaii. So does Leilani Estates need any new neighbors?

I will go halves with you Dalion!!!

Absolutely outstanding garden and specimens, what else can one say :rolleyes:

Can't wait to see it all with my own eyes in 4 months time... Any chance that beautiful Pritchardia viscosa had some fruit coming on it? Didn't look like it but maybe at Jeff's rate of growth they will have viable seed available in October :winkie::D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle

Thanks to Kim and Bo for all of your fine pictures.

For those of you that have never been able to visit Jeff's garden, you might consider it as one of the Great Wonders of the World. It's amazing to walk around and absorb everything there is to look at. I remember my visit there in the 90's, and I still remember everything big back then!

Oh and Jeff, thanks for the recent order of two dozen of the black Geonomas, their doing great! :winkie:

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry

Wonderful.

I wish I had the chance to visit a nursery where the proprietor could sell me twice the number of palms I had intended to purchase!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dr. George

Thanks, Bo and Kim - Great pics! - I walk the nursery every time we get a chance to visit, and am amazed at how many things I discover for the first time on each trip. The D. leucomalla is and has been my all time favorite palm since first seeing it in 2008. Jeff showed me the Dypsis sp. mealybugs (post #65) on the last visit and they are absolutely fascinating - very unusual and striking coloration. Thanks for taking the time to share your visit with all of us! - gmp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt in SD

Awesome photos Bo and Kim. I have to say that Jeff's garden might be the thing I miss most about going to Hawaii more regularly.

And I see this post has succeeded in selling some palms...let's really take it full circle and have someone here by my house in Leilani! See for sale section. Still a few days to buy before I get a realtor signed on.

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gtlevine

Thanks Kim, I am always totally amazed every time I see pictures of Jeff's garden, it is the finest collection of palms anywhere in the world. I think I need to go home and bulldoze my garden and take up stamp collecting.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cindy Adair

From BS man about Palms: " Kim, I just realized there is a function on my camera that allows a 5-8 second audio recording after you snap the pic. I don't know if all new cameras have this, but I think it would be handy for "overwhelming PRA's" :D I hope to try mine out soon enough."

Bill:I love the voice captioning option for plant names/location. My husband's camera has had it, but my old one didn't. Can't beat the ease with my new camera and sometimes you get nice background noises like frogs and birds too.

Of course I love all the photos and the only thing better will be the plants I receive from Floribunda tomorrow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mike in kurtistown

I agree with Bo. There is no reason to have a competitive response. This shows what can be done by a fully committed, full-time palm raiser under nearly ideal climatic conditions. If I can do on my property just a small fraction of what he has done, I will will be very pleased.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DALION

Folks, this is meant to INSPIRE! :)

It inspires me! Inspires me save some money to buy a little property in Hawaii. So does Leilani Estates need any new neighbors?

I will go halves with you Dalion!!!

Absolutely outstanding garden and specimens, what else can one say :rolleyes:

Can't wait to see it all with my own eyes in 4 months time... Any chance that beautiful Pritchardia viscosa had some fruit coming on it? Didn't look like it but maybe at Jeff's rate of growth they will have viable seed available in October :winkie::D

Kenny

I think this is how cooperative farming started. You and I can be in on thr ground floor of "Cooperative Palming." (I just wonder if this is how the first time share got started.)

Leo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hilo Jason

Speechless!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

My garden is better cause I can grow cactus!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

Oh yea, and his garden also sucks because my rental Prius almost shorted out, trying to get to his garden during the middle of one of those nasty Hawaiian instant rain storms, in which there was 2 ft of water running down the middle of the driveway!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt in SD

I honestly find seeing Jeff's garden in person and in photos is sort of therapeutic. I have a tendency to want to grow stuff that is "unknown". At some level if it's a palm I've never seen before, I want to grow it just to see what it looks like. But getting to see all this stuff looking like the best case scenario of what it will look like here in 10-20 years lets me make more rational decisions about what to plant, what to keep etc...

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

??:unsure::blink: <--- this is in regards to post #110

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jastin

??:unsure::blink: <--- this is in regards to post #110

Wouldn't that mean his car sucked?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kim

A trip to Floribunda, or a view of photos of his garden, is a learning experience, a chance to see palms you'll never see anywhere else in your entire life, not even in Madagascar or Thailand. It's also a chance to pick up a few special seedlings, and a few ordinary seedlings, take a few risks on unknowns, and leave with visions of fantastical palms bouncing around in your mind, and you dream palms for many nights afterward, with Jeff's voice droning in the background, and Suchin's big smile hovering in the dreams. (I am convinced most of you dream about palms.) It's worth going out of your way for a Floribunda experience --- WAY out of your way! :) For armchair travelers, there is always the lengthy inventory list for making notations and calculations. :rolleyes: Easy to get carried away. :mrlooney: Maybe I'll go back again -- forgot to ask for Verschaffeltia splendida...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Perito

#1 thread ever for large Dypsis and many other tropical beauties. Thanks Bo and Kim, beautiful photography of the Marcus's Incredible garden!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle

Oh yea, and his garden also sucks because my rental Prius almost shorted out, trying to get to his garden during the middle of one of those nasty Hawaiian instant rain storms, in which there was 2 ft of water running down the middle of the driveway!

Are you serious, you are just kidding, right? Your saying his garden sucks because you were there that day during some heavy rains? And your car stalled? And that's Jeff's fault? Jeff has worked very hard for over 20 years building up the finest private collection of palms anywhere in the world. Jeff happens to be a very good personal friend of mine. I have been to his nursery many times as well. AND I take it personally your rude comments you just made.

I could give a rat's a$$ about your cactus garden, or better yet, why don't you take a few pictures and show us just how great your garden looks. Then move on.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

Easy Jeff, pretty sure it was a tongue in cheek joke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

A trip to Floribunda is like a trip to the Louvre, except you can buy a priceless treasure (or treasures) of your own. After you awaken from swooning.

My garden is wall-to-wall Floribunda, almost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trioderob

this may sound silly - but if the palms are growing that fast - how long will they live ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oliver

Sorry Mr. Searle! I was joking, but I hate the big island for more than just Floribuda and my friend Jeff. I also hate it cause I can get in a crappy 25 ft boat and burn 5 gallons of diesel before hitting the jetties and catching a bigger marlin than has ever existed where I live. Sorry for being a hater (envy 'er') Jeff has done an awesome job with Floribunda!

O

BTW - I hate cactus!!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...