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Romeo

Best palms suited for Memphis,Tennessee

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Romeo

Hello ,
My Name is Ricky Romero but everyone calls me Romeo.
I live in Memphis, Tennessee
Im new here but have enjoyed learning so much by visiting the past 16 months.
Im ready to plant some palms but need some advice.
Can anyone offer some advice on what palms I might have luck with.
I have my eyes set on a Sabal palmetto but not sure if it would work.
We are a low z8a zone east.
Thank you , I cant bring anything to the table but I really enjoy this forum so much.

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empireo22

Hi Welcome! to Palm Talk! I live in NC and I grow Trachycarpus Fortunei, Butia Capitata, Sabal Palmetto, needle palm, european fan palm. and there are few other cold hardy varieties that grow in this area which is similiar to your climate. my zone is 8a near 7b border by the way. there are also some hybrid cold hardy palms that might grow in your area. Since its spring many nursuries or even home depot like stores are carring these varieties, if they grow in your area, that is one way to find what is succesful there. hope i helped.

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Cindy Adair

We grow the same palms described in the previous post in our zone 8b backyard in Eastern Virginia. The trachs (windmill palms) and Rhapidiophyllums(needles)laugh at the cold, but the Sabal palmettos suffer in winter. Sometimes they take until the Fall to look good again here and then with cold, suffer again. Check out (and join)the Southeastern Palm Society for lots of useful information and magazines as well as regional meetings. See their listing under the "share a site" portion of Palmtalk. Of course you should first become a member of IPS (if you aren't already) and use the search option for all of Palmtalk on these palms! Lots of nice and entertaining folks and great information here as you already know.

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DoomsDave

Romeo!

Welcome

And, well

Rhapidophyllum will grow for you

Along with the Sabal minor, you find growing in the roadways of Oklahoma, where the wind comes sweeping down the plains . . . .

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Keith in SoJax

Needle palms and Sabal minor are probably long-term hardy. Trachycarpus fortunei, Takil, and nanus are also good bets but may not be as reliable as the other 2. For arborescent Sabals, start with plants smaller than 15 gallons. Protect it through winter for a few years as it gets established. Be prepared that it might succumb in a cold snap. In addition to Sabal palmetto, acquire Sabal 'Birmingham'. It's lineage isn't understood, but it may be a hybrid, or simply an extra hardy S. palmetto..or neither. Again, it'll need some time to get established, but eventually it'll grow into a tree. The large B&B palmettos haven't been as cold hardy in marginal zones and they will be hard to protect those first winters. Also the bud being exposed to the cold makes them much more like to die by freezing. Good luck and know there are people growing palms in places where the common wisdom says it can't be done. This is a great board and I encourage you to use it frequently, but the Hardy Palm and Subtropical board is a fantastic resource for folks in TN. There are many members from TN and some have been growing palms in climates more challenging than Memphis.

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rozpalm

Welcome Romeo! I would probably add Nannorrhops ritchiana to your list.

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fastfeat

Wasn't there someone who had pics of a big Butia in Tennessee or Arkansas last year?

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Mark Heath

Wasn't there someone who had pics of a big Butia in Tennessee or Arkansas last year?

I was just gonna say the same thing! But your Butia would have to be large straight from the get go.

Welcome to the forum Romeo!

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Mandrew968

Welcome Romeo! I would probably add Nannorrhops ritchiana to your list.

Nannorhops doesn't like a lot of water--even in the heat. Cold plus wet equals death for them.

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Dave-Vero

You likely have fertile soil,which makes for all sorts of gardening possibilities with warm-temperate plants. You can also experiment with dry-climate plants by giving them excellent drainage. Some yuccas, Nolina, Dasylirion should do well. Yuccado nursery has a neat assortment of plants.

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Romeo

:floor:

thank you for the link

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Romeo

Hi Welcome! to Palm Talk! I live in NC and I grow Trachycarpus Fortunei, Butia Capitata, Sabal Palmetto, needle palm, european fan palm. and there are few other cold hardy varieties that grow in this area which is similiar to your climate. my zone is 8a near 7b border by the way. there are also some hybrid cold hardy palms that might grow in your area. Since its spring many nursuries or even home depot like stores are carring these varieties, if they grow in your area, that is one way to find what is succesful there. hope i helped.

thank you for some great ideas

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Romeo

We grow the same palms described in the previous post in our zone 8b backyard in Eastern Virginia. The trachs (windmill palms) and Rhapidiophyllums(needles)laugh at the cold, but the Sabal palmettos suffer in winter. Sometimes they take until the Fall to look good again here and then with cold, suffer again. Check out (and join)the Southeastern Palm Society for lots of useful information and magazines as well as regional meetings. See their listing under the "share a site" portion of Palmtalk. Of course you should first become a member of IPS (if you aren't already) and use the search option for all of Palmtalk on these palms! Lots of nice and entertaining folks and great information here as you already know.

Thank you Apaandssa . This is the best forum

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Romeo

Romeo!

Welcome

And, well

Rhapidophyllum will grow for you

Along with the Sabal minor, you find growing in the roadways of Oklahoma, where the wind comes sweeping down the plains . . . .

Thank you Dave for the tips. I have seen Sabal Minor and Rhapidophyllum at the Memphis Zoo but wasnt sure if it stayed out all year !

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Romeo

Needle palms and Sabal minor are probably long-term hardy. Trachycarpus fortunei, Takil, and nanus are also good bets but may not be as reliable as the other 2. For arborescent Sabals, start with plants smaller than 15 gallons. Protect it through winter for a few years as it gets established. Be prepared that it might succumb in a cold snap. In addition to Sabal palmetto, acquire Sabal 'Birmingham'. It's lineage isn't understood, but it may be a hybrid, or simply an extra hardy S. palmetto..or neither. Again, it'll need some time to get established, but eventually it'll grow into a tree. The large B&B palmettos haven't been as cold hardy in marginal zones and they will be hard to protect those first winters. Also the bud being exposed to the cold makes them much more like to die by freezing. Good luck and know there are people growing palms in places where the common wisdom says it can't be done. This is a great board and I encourage you to use it frequently, but the Hardy Palm and Subtropical board is a fantastic resource for folks in TN. There are many members from TN and some have been growing palms in climates more challenging than Memphis.

Thanks Keith , I have surfed there in the past and caught some negativity for Memphis and felt its just best not to ask for a pass there.

Thank You.

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Romeo

Welcome Romeo! I would probably add Nannorrhops ritchiana to your list.

Thanks Roz, We do get wet here as we are in the Mississippi Delta Region

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Romeo

You likely have fertile soil,which makes for all sorts of gardening possibilities with warm-temperate plants. You can also experiment with dry-climate plants by giving them excellent drainage. Some yuccas, Nolina, Dasylirion should do well. Yuccado nursery has a neat assortment of plants.

Awesome idea Dave, Thank You !

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Romeo

Wasn't there someone who had pics of a big Butia in Tennessee or Arkansas last year?

Ive seen posts he has made and he is from Little Rock, Arkansas but it may have been a W.Robusta , cant remember.

Thanks !

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Romeo

Wasn't there someone who had pics of a big Butia in Tennessee or Arkansas last year?

I was just gonna say the same thing! But your Butia would have to be large straight from the get go.

Welcome to the forum Romeo!

Thanks Mark , I guess size does matter in less hardy areas of the Central United States

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sarasota alex

Romeo, welcome to the forum!

Sabal palmetto would be marginal at best, but worth a try. Sabal mexicana might also be worth a try when it comes to trunking Sabals. And I would definitely give Jubaea a chance.

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fdrc65

Whelcome Romeo

I live in northern Italy, 44' N, in zone 8a, with wet and cold winters, we grow easily trachycarpus fortunei and chamaerops humilis (with some damage sometime), jubaea chilensins is slow but thrives, sabal minor, thritrinax campestris, brahea armata (with some protections)

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Keith in SoJax

Needle palms and Sabal minor are probably long-term hardy. Trachycarpus fortunei, Takil, and nanus are also good bets but may not be as reliable as the other 2. For arborescent Sabals, start with plants smaller than 15 gallons. Protect it through winter for a few years as it gets established. Be prepared that it might succumb in a cold snap. In addition to Sabal palmetto, acquire Sabal 'Birmingham'. It's lineage isn't understood, but it may be a hybrid, or simply an extra hardy S. palmetto..or neither. Again, it'll need some time to get established, but eventually it'll grow into a tree. The large B&B palmettos haven't been as cold hardy in marginal zones and they will be hard to protect those first winters. Also the bud being exposed to the cold makes them much more like to die by freezing. Good luck and know there are people growing palms in places where the common wisdom says it can't be done. This is a great board and I encourage you to use it frequently, but the Hardy Palm and Subtropical board is a fantastic resource for folks in TN. There are many members from TN and some have been growing palms in climates more challenging than Memphis.

Thanks Keith , I have surfed there in the past and caught some negativity for Memphis and felt its just best not to ask for a pass there.

Thank You.

Romeo, there are indeed some childish posters on that board. But if you ignore them, there are many more that genuinely like to help others succeed. From the pictures I've seen, I think Memphis has an amazing palm flora for TN, much like Chattanooga. The TN posters (even those that can be childish) have really opened my eyes about growing palms in places where I'd never have figured it to be possible. So don't let pettiness there prevent you from learning.

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Romeo

Needle palms and Sabal minor are probably long-term hardy. Trachycarpus fortunei, Takil, and nanus are also good bets but may not be as reliable as the other 2. For arborescent Sabals, start with plants smaller than 15 gallons. Protect it through winter for a few years as it gets established. Be prepared that it might succumb in a cold snap. In addition to Sabal palmetto, acquire Sabal 'Birmingham'. It's lineage isn't understood, but it may be a hybrid, or simply an extra hardy S. palmetto..or neither. Again, it'll need some time to get established, but eventually it'll grow into a tree. The large B&B palmettos haven't been as cold hardy in marginal zones and they will be hard to protect those first winters. Also the bud being exposed to the cold makes them much more like to die by freezing. Good luck and know there are people growing palms in places where the common wisdom says it can't be done. This is a great board and I encourage you to use it frequently, but the Hardy Palm and Subtropical board is a fantastic resource for folks in TN. There are many members from TN and some have been growing palms in climates more challenging than Memphis.

Thanks Keith , I have surfed there in the past and caught some negativity for Memphis and felt its just best not to ask for a pass there.

Thank You.

Romeo, there are indeed some childish posters on that board. But if you ignore them, there are many more that genuinely like to help others succeed. From the pictures I've seen, I think Memphis has an amazing palm flora for TN, much like Chattanooga. The TN posters (even those that can be childish) have really opened my eyes about growing palms in places where I'd never have figured it to be possible. So don't let pettiness there prevent you from learning.

Thanks for taking the time to reply.

It wasn't the Tennessee posters I was referring too but did notice some animosity from the Chattanooga area but thats OK. We should all be proud from where we live. On my way to Houston this long weekend and hoping to see a nice palmetto for sale.

Thank you.

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Romeo

Romeo, welcome to the forum!

Sabal palmetto would be marginal at best, but worth a try. Sabal mexicana might also be worth a try when it comes to trunking Sabals. And I would definitely give Jubaea a chance.

Alex thanks for posting to me.

You live in one of the most desirable places in Florida. Its just beautiful there and likely a z10 climate.

I will place your suggestions to good use.

Thank You

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Romeo

Whelcome Romeo

I live in northern Italy, 44' N, in zone 8a, with wet and cold winters, we grow easily trachycarpus fortunei and chamaerops humilis (with some damage sometime), jubaea chilensins is slow but thrives, sabal minor, thritrinax campestris, brahea armata (with some protections)

Hi Federico , Thank you for posting to me.

It seems our climates could be identical.

Our summers are brutal here and the humidity is extreme.

Winters are not uncommon with a cold spike from Canada but they are short lived.

There are Trachycarpus Fortunei growing here but its like no one cares for subtropical plants as they are seldom seen. There are Bananas plantings everywhere but Im doing my part to change that.

Thanks again for your recommendations!

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sarasota alex

Romeo, welcome to the forum!

Sabal palmetto would be marginal at best, but worth a try. Sabal mexicana might also be worth a try when it comes to trunking Sabals. And I would definitely give Jubaea a chance.

Alex thanks for posting to me.

You live in one of the most desirable places in Florida. Its just beautiful there and likely a z10 climate.

I will place your suggestions to good use.

Thank You

Thanks Romeo! While we are in zone 10 here, we actually have trouble growing some of the cold hardy species down here. Most Trachycarpus don't do well here long term and you probably have a better chance of growing a Jubaea to maturity in the Memphis area than in Central or South Florida.

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