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palmcurry

Visit to Gary Levine's palmscape

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palmcurry

For awhile now I've heard much about this place from fellow palm nuts and here on this website. High in the hills of Escondido San Diego, California with good decomposed granite soil and about 10 -12 miles inland, this place has optimuim SoCal conditions for palms. Gary was nice enough to let me come over this Saturday and Here is what I saw. Not the best lighting or season for photography but here goes.

levine3-10-12-LevinePalmRanch.jpg

These photos are just a portion of Gary's grove. Many plants left out. When first entering the property this big Dypsis decipiens greets you.

levine3-10-12-1.jpg

Another bigger one.

levine3-10-12-1Dd2-1.jpg

Parajubaea sunkha or torallyi....not sure. My ID's are never great.

levine3-10-12-2P-sunkha.jpg

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palmcurry

Closer

levine3-10-12-3P-sunkha.jpg

Sabal ursana. One of the many palms I have not seen in person before.

levine3-10-12-4Sabal.jpg

Roystonea borinquena

levine3-10-12-5Rb.jpg

Psuedophoenix sargentii. Freaking wow.

levine3-10-12-6Ps.jpg

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palmcurry

Ravenea xerophila. Had no idea how silver white these are.

levine3-10-12-7Rx1.jpg

levine3-10-12-8Rx2.jpg

levine3-10-12-9Rx3.jpg

levine3-10-12-10Rx4.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-11Rx5.jpg

Cool Baja plant.

levine3-10-12-12.jpg

Gary told me this is a Ficus petiolaris that comes from Mexico. I like the white trunk and colors in the leaves.

levine3-10-12-13Ficus.jpg

levine3-10-12-14Ficus.jpg

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iamjv

Nice pictures Vince.... hope there's more to come!!!

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Gtlevine

It was nice having you Vince.

The Parajubaea is Microcarpa, the baja plant is a Boojum Tree.

Hope to see you again,

Gary

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palmcurry

First Allogoptra with size I've seen. A.arenaria.

levine3-10-12-14.jpg

I forgot what this is. Starts with a 'B' ??

levine3-10-12-15.jpg

Archontophoenix purperea(s)

levine3-10-12-16.jpg

levine3-10-12-17.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-17b.jpg

The Dypsis 'not so true' ambositrae

levine3-10-12-18.jpg

Kentiopsis pyriformis

levine3-10-12-17Kpyr.jpg

Dypsis sp. slick willie

levine3-10-12-19.jpg

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palmcurry

Some Beccariophoenix alfrediis. Biggest I've seen.

levine3-10-12-35Balfredii.jpg

With teddy bears in background.

levine3-10-12-35Balfredii2.jpg

African sausage tree!?!?!

levine3-10-12-20.jpg

Pritchardia beccariana

levine3-10-12-22P.jpg

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palmcurry

Some Hedyscepe canterburyana. This one's a fatty.

levine3-10-12-23Hc1.jpg

Others

levine3-10-12-24Hc2.jpg

levine3-10-12-25Hc3.jpg

levine3-10-12-25Hc4.jpg

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Gtlevine

Vince, post number 7 the palm starting with "B" is actually Hyphanae Petersoniana.

The Pritchardia is Viscosa, the becarriana is in the distance behind it.

Gary

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palmcurry

Don't know.

levine3-10-12-26.jpg

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levine3-10-12-30Jd1.jpg

A close up of that Jubaeopsis caffra in that last shot. With seed.

levine3-10-12-30Jd.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-29IronWood.jpg

Here is the grove of Ravenea glaucas that is so prominent here. Excuse me if these pics get redundant.

levine3-10-12-27Rg1.jpg

levine3-10-12-28Rg2.jpg

levine3-10-12-28Rg3.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-28Rg6.jpg

levine3-10-12-28Rg5.jpg

Ravenea hildebrantiis.

levine3-10-12-40Rhild3.jpg

levine3-10-12-40Rhild2.jpg

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Cindy Adair

Great photos of lovely palms! Interesting too because I can see palms that I think in general won't grow well for me. I grow the Roystonia and Teddy Bears and a few others, but most of the other ones would be too cold in Virginia and too wet in the Puerto Rican mountains. So I'll have to admire these species when I visit California. Thanks for sharing.

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-40Rhild1.jpg

Group of Dypsis leptocheilos.

levine3-10-12-36Dlepto.jpg

levine3-10-12-36Dlepto1.jpg

levine3-10-12-36Dlepto2.jpg

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levine3-10-12-36Dlepto3.jpg

Dypsis prestoniana

levine3-10-12-37Dprest.jpg

Some Dypsis onilahensis.

levine3-10-12-39.jpg

levine3-10-12-32Doni1.jpg

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kylecawazafla

wow! wow!!! wow!!! Gary has an incredible yard! I wish I could see it for myself! One day!

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palmcurry

Dypsis baronii

levine3-10-12-43-1.jpg

2 mad foxes. Someone give me the right ID?!?!?! :D

levine3-10-12-41madfox1.jpg

levine3-10-12-41madfox2.jpg

Dypsis lanceolata. Surprised to see these doing this well out here.

levine3-10-12-34.jpg

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palmcurry

Foxy lady freak out. Specific crosses will not be specified!

levine3-10-12-33Foxies3.jpg

levine3-10-12-33Foxies2.jpg

levine3-10-12-33Foxies.jpg

levine3-10-12-33Foxies1.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-33Foxies4.jpg

The fuzz and color!

levine3-10-12-33Foxies5-1.jpg

Here are some close ups of that Dypsis malcomberi by the boulder in that last shot.

levine3-10-12-38Dmealy1.jpg

levine3-10-12-38Dmealy2.jpg

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palmcurry

levine3-10-12-38Dmealy3.jpg

Forgot this one. Mealybug palm on the left.

levine3-10-12-33Foxies6.jpg

Young jube.

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One of the many mule crosses Gary has. I believe this one is called F2.

levine3-10-12-45muleF2.jpg

Thats it for this cycle. Thanks Gary for your time. This place really shows what you what is possible!

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kylecawazafla

Thank you for all of the photos! It was a great sample of palms!

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newcal

I don't know why you're so hard on yourself Vince,i thought the photos were Outstanding to say the least! :drool: .Lovely setting there Gary,good to see the palms growing well especially after that dreadful bushfire you experienced some time ago.A definite Must See if i'm ever able to make it to the USA some day...Cheers Mike Green(Newcal) :)

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ghar41

Thank you for sharing! Wow, lots of really large, rare palms. The Foxy Lady's are incredible. :drool:

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gyuseppe

really a nice collection of rare palm trees

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Bill Austin

Thanks Vince for the great pic. Gary you have an unreal placegreenthumb.gif

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Tassie_Troy1971

Thanks vince for some mouth watering pics of Gary's Garden - I can see alot of growth from Sept 2010 - today .

Dypsis decipiens and Hedyscepe :drool: is all i can say !

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PalmatierMeg

Whoa, I'm speechless (almost). What a great place with fantastic palms. That Pseudophoenix is the fattest I've ever seen. The Ravenea xerophila is the biggest I've seen in the US. I'm surprised at how many Dypsis can grow in an arid climate under blazing sun. Thanks for the photos.

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redant

Palms boulders and a mountain background, sweet. I bet keeping all those drip lines going is a full time job.

Edited by redant

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Chris Chance

Great pics. That place looks amazing!

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Firepalm

An inspiring garden to say the least! Thanks for sharing the pics.

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bgl

Vince,

Thanks for the great pictures! Gary has an outstanding garden with spectacular palms, and I was fortunate to visit him in early December 2011 so I can relate to your experience. :)

Bo-Göran

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Hilo Jason

Great pictures Vince. and great palms Gary!

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Walter John

Thanks Vince and Gary, I loved the Raveneas, a great palmscape, all looks terrific. The mad foxes by the way are Dypsis marojejyi.

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Mike Evans

WOW, what a contrast. Beautiful mature palms & boulders the size of houses. I would have never thought you could grow these in such a harsh environment. I do not see any mulch? What a great garden Gary. Thanks for posting Vince. Love those rocks!

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Gtlevine

Thanks everyone for the kind words, and Vince for posting the pictures.

Mike, I do not mulch except for areas subject to erosion. Mulch provides a medium for bacteria and fungus to proliferate, I prefer the surface to dry out between waterings.

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JasonD

Gary's garden is a superlative achievement! Someday I'd love to see it.

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Jeff Searle

Vince,

Thanks for taking the time to post all these great pictures. I hope you have more.

Gary,

Since my last visit, I can definitely see the growth that the palms have made. You have some impressive palms growing in the collection. And still love all the big boulders!

Jeff

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Central Floridave

Nice specimen palms. Thanks for the photos.

I was thinking the same thing. Where's the mulch? " Mulch provides a medium for bacteria and fungus to proliferate" Since when is that a bad thing for plants?

You obviously know what you are doing in growing palms, but mulch would be a little more ornamental and would help the palm stick out better. Plus, less watering requirements and would prevent drying out. Which is what I would think

would be ideal living in a desert climate.

But, I don't garden on a hill with erosion, so excuse my comments if mulch is a maintenance nightmare.

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