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elHoagie

Satakentia liukiuensis

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elHoagie

150cm tall plant in 2 gallon container inside my greenhouse.  Very minor damage after 33F.

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Small one gal size plant in ground under the canopy of a King palm.

No damage... Official Modesto temps 23f... My garden temps 26f.

Jeff

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LJG

(Jeff in Modesto @ Feb. 03 2007,12:13)

QUOTE
Small one gal size plant in ground under the canopy of a King palm.

No damage... Official Modesto temps 23f... My garden temps 26f.

Jeff

This does not make sense. Satakentia liukiuensis handled 26 degrees? Is there anyone else with data on these?

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Don't know what doesn't make sense about what I said?

Anyway, here is a pic today. It is still small but wasn't covered this winter.

Jeff

sat.JPG

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tikitiki

About a five gallon plant with mulch around its growing point. No problems at all after 2 nights at 32f the 2nd night had frost as well. It is planted under limited canopy of a Delonix regia.

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Dave-Vero

Two Satake palms, each around 6 feet tall (with taller spears) without canopy protection. Both are somewhat shaded in winter (north side of house).

The temperature, under a clear sky with a slight breeze, fell to freezing about 9:30 pm and remained at 31-32 degrees F until falling to about 30 at dawn (temperatures are from the airport, about a mile away. My neighborhood has lots of trees, so may have been a degree or two warmer).

Both Satakentias suffered burning on the younger leaves. The spears seem undamaged. Palms in the yard, with full exposure to the sky, that suffered no apparent damage include Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, A. tuckeri, Carpentaria, Dypsis decaryi, Thrinax radiata, and Dypsis "fine leaf".

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Dave-Vero

The satakes look no worse a day later (low temperature last night was 33, surprisingly without frost). I'm reminded that these palms have suffered sunburn damage in the summer. I suspect that the cold damage may be as much from dry conditions as from the mild freeze.

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Dave-Vero

post-275-1233002496_thumb.jpg

Leaf damage spread a bit over the past several days. Some leaves were hard hit, others untouched.

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MattyB

Not too bad Dave. Thanks for the pic.

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Dave-Vero

Oddly, most of the damage was to one of the two plants. The larger of the pair suffered damage to just one leaf. Damage is similar to what the neighbors' Dypsis lutescens suffered.

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Dave-Vero

Both of the Satakentias have burning on most of their leaves after two nights, each with about nine hours of freezing temperatures. The colder night got down to 28 degrees [-2.2 C], twice, at the nearby airport. An adjacent Archontophoenix tuckeri has modest leaf burning (most leaves untouched). A. cunninghamiana, Carpentaria, Coccothrinax x Zombia, Dypsis plumosa, D. decaryi, and Thrinax radiata appear untouched. A coconut palm across the street is badly browned.

I expect the Satakentia leaf damage to spread and worsen over the next week, as it did last year.

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Dave-Vero

post-275-12647846794783_thumb.jpg

Browning hasn't spread much since the freeze, but tissue death makes things look worse. The spears seem fine.

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palmann

Dave,

Are you in southern part of Vero?, I lived in VLE/ close to 95, and cant seem to grow anything here because of the freeze. I dont have any overhead protection and all my palms get toast and eventually perish. Pretty soon Im gonna be pushing daisys.. I wish I could see your yard one of this day.

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Dave-Vero

I'm near the airport. The yard has partial oak canopy, which seems protective even when a freeze brings lots of air movement and temperatures are supposedly pretty uniform across broad areas. We were supposedly only barely warmer than Orlando thanks to all the northwesterly wind.

It's been interesting to notice how royal palms fared well near the coast, but not around I-95. Coconuts are badly toasted near my house, but look better near the beach. I bet satake palms would do well at the beach, especially if planted on the south sides of buildings and/or in areas with good live oak canopy.

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Alan_Tampa

Toast at 26F. Will see how it recovers.

Alan

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bubba

Two weeks after the cold:

P1020490.jpg

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Dave-Vero

post-275-097460600 1297369516_thumb.jpg

Here's one of mine, fried from 26 F (-3 C), followed by 28 two weeks later. Photo was taken in January after the full extent of damage was apparent. They are both exposed to the sky. I strongly suspect they would have fared better under partial oak tree canopy. A young oak is growing in their direction.

This Satakentia will soon be unfurling a partly-damaged new leaf. Unfortunately, it and the one next to it were just recovering from last year's damage, so I doubt that they have resources for a quick recovery.

[To the rear and right of the Satakentia is a leaf-burned Archontophoenix tuckeri]

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Dave-Vero

Here's the same Satakentia from a slightly different angle, October 19, 2011.

It looks poised to fully recover if the upcoming winter is mild. The nearly full-sized leaf unfurling is encouraging.

The Satakentia visible in part on the right is nearly fully recovered. It only has a couple of damaged leaves.

post-275-084798700 1319080771_thumb.jpg

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Dave-Vero

Here's the same Satakentia from a slightly different angle, October 19, 2011.

It looks poised to fully recover if the upcoming winter is mild. The nearly full-sized leaf unfurling is encouraging.

The Satakentia visible in part on the right is nearly fully recovered. It only has a couple of damaged leaves.

post-275-084798700 1319080771_thumb.jpg

And here's that other one. The two are almost certainly siblings, from the same batch of seed:

post-275-001585900 1319081094_thumb.jpg

This one has nearly completed restoring its crown.

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Jeff Searle

I knew these were pretty tough, but I didn't know that they were THAT tough.

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Dave-Vero

post-275-0-10385200-1394767694_thumb.jpg

Here's my Satakentias this past summer. There has been some browning of leaves, possibly related to what seems to be a nutrient problem in the bed to the rear. The palms have been putting out new leaves regularly, and I think the browning problem may solve itself this coming summer. We had a balmy winter with no significant damage in the yard, except to some very tender heliconia leaves.

I doubt that these palms will prove hardy in our climate in a time frame of, perhaps, 20 years.

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BS Man about Palms

Was that a Jeff bump??

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RedRabbit
On 2/1/2010, 7:22:09, Alan_Tampa said:

Toast at 26F. Will see how it recovers.

 

Alan

Did yours ever come back?

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Alan_Tampa

Nope, that was the end of that!

  • Upvote 1

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RedRabbit
51 minutes ago, Alan_Tampa said:

Nope, that was the end of that!

Sorry to hear that. :(

It sounds reasonably cold tolerant, but if it didn't survive for you I'll just cross it off my list. 

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Alan_Tampa

That was a bad winter,  I've been meaning to try one again.  I had it for 7 years before winter got it, not too bad. Don't cross it off yet!

  • Upvote 1

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