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NCPalm

Folded Trachycarpus Fortunei Fronds

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NCPalm

Does anyone know why the leaves on the fronds of my trachycarpus fortunei would be folding in half lenghwise? this has been the case for about the last 6 to 7 months. I live in coastal NC and the tree gets plenty of water. i have three other trees and their leaves are broad and flat.

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Jimhardy

Not to big a problem(yet?)as long as it's not the center leaves.

Sign of stress or normal leaf loss? :blink:

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NCPalm

All of the fronds new and old look the same.

Not to big a problem(yet?)as long as it's not the center leaves.

Sign of stress or normal leaf loss? :blink:

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Collectorpalms

Is it still growing actively? Normally it does that when it is stressed from heat or drought. Although, if the roots have died back for some reason, then it is showing signs of stress. Do you see active white roots if you dig around the trunk?

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NCPalm

it is still growing although it seems a little slower than it used to. Of the four trachys I have this is one of three that receives a lot of shade in the summer provided by taller hard wood trees. The fourth tree gets a lot of sun and is doing fine. Drought is definatelly a problem where I live. Our soil almost never dries out. I have not dug around the trunk to check for active white roots, but I can. I agree that I would expect to see these symptoms if the tree were stressed from heat and/or drought, but neither fits in this case. I am stumped.

Is it still growing actively? Normally it does that when it is stressed from heat or drought. Although, if the roots have died back for some reason, then it is showing signs of stress. Do you see active white roots if you dig around the trunk?

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Jeff zone 8 N.C.

It's hard to diagnose a problem without more information so my answer is a guess. I think it has root rot. You said it was in a lot of shade and gets plenty of water. I bet if you dig it up in early February (if you see no severe cold in the long range forecast) and build up a raised bed to plant it in, it will recover.

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njoasis

It's definitely STRESS related. Which does not tell you very much because you can see the same result from very different environmental factors--too much water...not enough... root problems, etc.. (I had one large T. fortunei do this during the summer--probably was not a good idea for me to have transplanted in the heat of summer.--It died.) Hopefully, yours will grow out of it but you may have to be prepared for a loss.

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Nigel

Its definitely a water issue because the palm is doing this to conserve water in the summer months.

So its either short of water or the root mass is being damaged in some way.

In winter does the water table rise and maybe suffocate a lot of roots ?

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Jimhardy

George

How long has/when was it planted?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Optional read :winkie:

I have C.cerifera that arrived like that,the leaves never

have opened but the new leaves are fine..........

Interestingly/luckily,the root issues it had

saved it last winter as the plant was pretty dry overall

and I think this helped it get through the winter,my other "healthy" one and/also

the replacement for this one had total core pull but recovered from side shoots.

Anyway,blah,blah,blah.

The old leaves MAY never recover but if the center/new growth is vigorous it surely will grow out of it.

My guess would be-new planting, no worries just some shock/stress.

Been in the ground 7 years(for instance)and suddenly doing this...goner :unsure:

Edited by Jimhardy

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NCPalm

Well the palm has made it so far after being in the ground since the summer of 2008. Last Sunday I decided to dig it up, wash all the soil I could from the roots and transplant it to a higher and sunnier location. I hope this was the right move. I took several pictures during the process and would like to know if anyone has any thoughts on it's future.

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NCpalmqueen

What part of the coast are you located at? I have many trachies planted here in red clay (west of Raleigh), which get absolutely saturated during winter months but with no ill effects on the trachys. The only times I've had folded leaves are from cold or drought stressors, which happens annually. You are braver than I to dig up a large trachy and move it. :blink:

The palm will now go through transplant stress...hopefully this crazy heat we've been having won't make matters worse. It needs to re-establish before the big heat comes. Good luck with it.

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NCpalmqueen

What part of the coast are you located at? I have many trachies planted here in red clay (west of Raleigh), which get absolutely saturated during winter months but with no ill effects on the trachys. The only times I've had folded leaves are from cold or drought stressors, which happens annually. You are braver than I to dig up a large trachy and move it. :blink:

The palm will now go through transplant stress...hopefully this crazy heat we've been having won't make matters worse. It needs to re-establish before the big heat comes. Good luck with it.

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NCPalm

I am in Currituck County just south of the NC/VA border. I only transplanted on the prospect of loosing the palm anyway.

What part of the coast are you located at? I have many trachies planted here in red clay (west of Raleigh), which get absolutely saturated during winter months but with no ill effects on the trachys. The only times I've had folded leaves are from cold or drought stressors, which happens annually. You are braver than I to dig up a large trachy and move it. :blink:

The palm will now go through transplant stress...hopefully this crazy heat we've been having won't make matters worse. It needs to re-establish before the big heat comes. Good luck with it.

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richnorm

You should stake that palm though I'm afraid I fear its prospects are poor.

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Keith in SoJax

That root system was definately compromised. Maybe root rot caused by Phytophthora, or something else like wet feet. I'd give it a rather low chance of survivng too. I'd just replace it. Trachycarpus are more enduring in the clay soils to your west. It may be the nematodes just find them irrestible and that leads to decline. Plant pathogenic Nematodes don't like clay.

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