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redant

Beccariophoenix crazy

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redant

I love them all, Good growers, some cold tolerance, and the windows form looks just amazingly tropical.

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redant

A couple of coastals

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redant

Some alfredii and another windows. The alfredii is a great one for a pot, does really well. First pic is alfredii verses a coconut, planted at the same time and the same size and same location, should be fun to watch.

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Tomw

I agree what a great palm. I now have more Beccariophoenixes than I do Coco’s, thanks to Yellowing disease. I now find that I like the Beccariophoenixes better!

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Hammer

Thanks for the great pics. Coconut and coconut-like palms are my very favorite. Just got my hands on a couple alfredii recently. I'm pretty new to this whole palm thing...well at least to the forum here and to keeping palms...but not to loving them.

Please post lots of pictures. I am very interested to see the Cocos n. and the B. Alfredii perform next to each other and how they look in comparison at various stages. I've been searching and searching for good comparisons like this for a long time. Thanks so much!!!!

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Peter

Nice photos! I also love Beccariophoenix, especially since we in California can't grow coconuts. Here is my largest alfredii, growing well despite the fact that gophers ate all the roots of the bottom of the stem. About 3 years in the ground from a large liner, so they're not that slow:

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And here's a windows growing in Hawaii:

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Edited by Peter

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Tomw

The Beccariophoenix has all the beauty of the coconut but without a lot of the negatives of cold hardiness, yellowing disease and coconuts coming crashing down.

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redant

Just keep a big bag of ironite around if you like the windows form. They will certainly croak without a big handful every couple of months.

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Mandrew968

The Beccariophoenix has all the beauty of the coconut but without a lot of the negatives of cold hardiness, yellowing disease and coconuts coming crashing down.

Very true, but not nearly as fast. A happy coconut can be one of the fastest palms you can grow, in South Florida.

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Mike Evans

Just keep a big bag of ironite around if you like the windows form. They will certainly croak without a big handful every couple of months.

I agree w/ you on the iron. I planted ~100 of the windows form in 3 gal. They slowly turned very chlorotic, almost white in color. Added some ironite & did not help. Probably because the soil was too sweet. I then added sulfur pellets to lower the ph & large amount of 30% ferrous sulfate. They quickly returned to a nice green. Did the same for the one I have in the ground.

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Mike Evans

I love the B alfredii w/ the coconut similarities. Here are a few I have in the ground & nursery. These are not as heavy iron feeders as the windows type. Last 2 pics is a windows form in the ground. I am surprised that there has not been more activity on this thread. I would like to see who has the largest alfredii. Please post yours!

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sonoranfans

I have 3 alfredii and had one windows form. Last winter one alfredii and one windows for were in the ground within 15' in the open. Both were defoliated, including spear, by two good frosts at 28,30F in december. The windows form croaked, but the alfredii came back strong. I understand that the alfredii can take lower temps than 28F, the frost might be a concern. But in my case the alfredii came back nicely. I am interested to see if they become even more frost/cold hardy as they get bigger.

Edited by sonoranfans

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Hammer

I love the B alfredii w/ the coconut similarities. Here are a few I have in the ground & nursery. These are not as heavy iron feeders as the windows type. Last 2 pics is a windows form in the ground. I am surprised that there has not been more activity on this thread. I would like to see who has the largest alfredii. Please post yours!

I completely agree Mike. I'm surprised too that there isn't more discussion on this thread. I am really curious who does have the largest Alfredii out there. VERY curious to see how they are growing having been in domestic cultivation for such a short time. Selfishly I would like to see how big the top performers are in Southern California...and if there are any good tips for keeping them happy and growing at their maximum potential. I've got a couple that aren't ready for the ground just yet. Would love to learn from others so I don't screw up too bad the first time around.

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JD in the OC

I have heard FL and CA growers both say theirs have withstood 26deg F with little to no burn.

I believe these are the largest B. alfredii in cultivation. Any one know of any larger?...

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redant

What a great looking palm, the one in the top picture to the right is very impressive. Where are these located, I'll get my shovel. Hopefully their in the hood and noboby will miss them. :lol:

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Ryland

It's great to see and hear about the success of these palms, particularly on the West Coast of the USA. Anyone know of any suppliers?

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Hammer

I have heard FL and CA growers both say theirs have withstood 26deg F with little to no burn.

I believe these are the largest B. alfredii in cultivation. Any one know of any larger?...

DSCN9912.jpg

DSCN9910.jpg

DSCN9913.jpg

Wow! Cool! I assume these are growing near you in Ft. Myers? How long have they been in the ground?

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Hammer

It's great to see and hear about the success of these palms, particularly on the West Coast of the USA. Anyone know of any suppliers?

I bought two about two months ago from ... http://sotropicalfoxtails.com/

They're still in pots on my patio and doing quite well.

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JD in the OC

Hammer,

No, they're not near Ft. Myers. I'm not sure if I can disclose where they are. I'm not sure how old these are, but we have one in the ground grown from seed germinated in 2007 and it's 5ft tall.

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Peter

Awesome Justin! I wonder how long it will be for us in California to get them that large?

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mlovecan

Holy #@&£!!

That Florida palm in the back is absolutely the closest thing I have seen to a coconut!!

My main supplier has had these for a few years now and I have never picked any up.

Will be plugging some of those in the ground this spring - wish I did about four years ago.

Regards

Maurice

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Palmə häl′ik

I dunno fellas...

I had over a dozen last year... I'm down to three.

The three that made it were not exposed to frost, while the ones that are no longer around were...

I usually see frost around 25-28F, although its prevelent in some locations at 30-32F

Canopy saved my three 'chosen' ones; as I call them! :mrlooney:

~Ray.

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Palmə häl′ik

Those big ones pictures just may be 'frost tolerant' though...

But I know for a fact, the little ones just won't take that icing on the foliage.

~Ray.

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Walter John

Bugs on my Beccario alfred.

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Eric in Orlando

We are growing all 3. Beccariophoenix alfredii is definitely the "winner". Its the fastest grower and also hardy so far. It also is easier than the windows form, doesn't get the iron deficiency.

Here is a B. alfredii in an open exposed location. The past 2 winters it was been exposed to frost and temperatures down to 28-29F numerous occasions with no damage

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Our biggest B. alfredii

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Beccariophoenix sp. (no windows), hardy but slow growing

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Eric in Orlando

We had 2 B. madagascariensis/ "window form". The biggest was about 7ft tall but died this spring. It had survived the last 2 cold winters with damage and was stunted and finally croaked this spring. Here is the one that survived. It was stunted also but grew out of it this summer

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buffy

Strangely, all of the B. alfredii pictures remind me of my Jubaea x Queen.

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Mike Evans

Hammer,

No, they're not near Ft. Myers. I'm not sure if I can disclose where they are. I'm not sure how old these are, but we have one in the ground grown from seed germinated in 2007 and it's 5ft tall.

Justin, thanks for posting the pics of the alfredii. Those are definitely the largest I have seen. So far, mine seem to be at least a moderate grower. They send out new leaves, quite regular.

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LJG

Didn't 'no windows' become B madagascariensis? And the 'windows' for have a name change to something not yet released?

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MattyB

I've tried ironite, and adding sulfur/acidifier and ironite for my B. windows, and nothing seems to help, except warmer weather. It's fattening up and getting well rooted, but the leaves are a very light yellow now that it's cold out. :angry:

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mlovecan

DSCN9912.jpg

I don't know about most people, but I really don't see any difference!

Again, I just gotta get me some of those.

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Walter John

I've tried ironite, and adding sulfur/acidifier and ironite for my B. windows, and nothing seems to help, except warmer weather. It's fattening up and getting well rooted, but the leaves are a very light yellow now that it's cold out. :angry:

Oh ya Matty, mine had it's leaves go yellow this last winter of ours and is still trying to get back it's former green. I've used fertiliser, we'll see how it shapes up by Autumnish.

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quaman58

I've tried ironite, and adding sulfur/acidifier and ironite for my B. windows, and nothing seems to help, except warmer weather. It's fattening up and getting well rooted, but the leaves are a very light yellow now that it's cold out. :angry:

Matty, I remember an IPS article a few years ago where there was a commercial grade fert that was a "chelated iron" product, whatever that means. The author described two bleached out "windows" variety in a botanical garden that both greened up "miraculously" within a couple months after application. It would be nice to know what makes these things tick.

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MattyB

I believe Ironite is "chelated iron", which just means that it's in a form that they can absorb readily.

...and you're not allowed to post on this topic unless you post a pic of your hugemongous Beccariophoenix!!!!! New Rule!!!!

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Palmə häl′ik

You gotta watch the labeling on that Ironite...

Go with the granular or powdered form... It's straight Iron.

The liquid version'll have more Nitrogen vs actual Iron in it.

~Ray.

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quaman58

I need to take some new pictures of mine; I think the most recent is from 2009. It really seemed to blow up this past summer. Anyway, here's couple older ones..

I think I planted this in 2004; this is after about a year in the ground:

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2006, still keeping pretty good color

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Late summer 2007, with 14 yo #2 son for scale

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Last one 2009, one of my favorite pictures although a bit blurry. Both palm & son growing like weeds. :)

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I'll get an updated one this weekend, thanks for looking!

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JD in the OC

Looking pretty tropical there Bret!

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realarch

Been pretty lucky keeping the color on this 'windows' form. Haven't had to baby this one too much and it's one fast booger.

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July 2009

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November 2011

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tikitiki

I agree 100% but if the soil temp is down the roots can't absorb the nutrients at all no matter the quality. When the soil is cold liquid applications are the only way to go.

You gotta watch the labeling on that Ironite...

Go with the granular or powdered form... It's straight Iron.

The liquid version'll have more Nitrogen vs actual Iron in it.

~Ray.

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Mike Evans

I believe Ironite is "chelated iron", which just means that it's in a form that they can absorb readily.

...and you're not allowed to post on this topic unless you post a pic of your hugemongous Beccariophoenix!!!!! New Rule!!!!

Matt, I have priced chelated iron from the wholesale nursery suppliers. It is very expensive. I purchased 30 % Iron, Ferrous Sulfate & some sulfur pellets. Ironite is ~ 4.5% iron, not to mention all the other heavy metals. I applied an overdose amount of both in the 3 gallon containers ( ~70 palms), just because I did not have anything to loose. The "windows form" leaves were almost white & slowly dieing. It worked, & they all look great now & sending out full leaves. I also read that Iron deficiency can be caused by old compacted soil, especially in containers. That was not the case with mine.

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