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epicure3

Dypsis lutescens

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epicure3

Low of 29. no frost

Largest clump with fronds about 10 feet in the air. Freeze damage to the highest frond only. The rest of this one seems ok.

1 other smallish clump untouched even in the coldest part of the yard in shade.

4 other clumps are canopy protected and I haven't seen them yet.

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doubravsky

Low of 24. Two clumps, no visible damage. They are 3 ft. from a pool that I heated to 65 that night... I thinkit saved them.

post-33-1168921116_thumb.jpg

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spockvr6

(doubravsky @ Jan. 15 2007,23:18)

QUOTE
Low of 24. Two clumps, no visible damage. They are 3 ft. from a pool that I heated to 65 that night... I thinkit saved them.

I think you might be right.

24F should have made D. lutescens look like it was about 2 ft from the receiving end of one of Epicure's kerosene heat blasters :D

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doubravsky

I think the pool made a very big difference. All the stuff near the pool came out pretty much unscathed.... whereas the other side of the yard is a death camp.

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MattyB

D. lutescens, 5 stems, several w/ a couple of rings, 7' tall overall

24.1F, no frost, Majesty and Queen palms planted about 8 feet on either side, up to about 15-20 feet but no direct overhead protection.

40% leaf burn all on top leaves

(took 28F, no frost, night before w/ no damage.  Note:  this palm normally yellows/goldens during winter but the instant damage didn't occur until the 24.1F night)

post-126-1168921972_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

Low of about 25 FF.

No damage.

Hail Mary!

dave

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Don Little

15 gallon plant that 1 week after freeze has showed minimal leaf damage.  Plant is next to south facing block wall.  There is no sensor near it but the coldest sensor read 29 in openly exposed area so I'll go with 29 degrees.

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Gonzer

Not sure why my lutescens got a suntan while a baronii 10' away was untouched. 5 miles inland, San Luis Rey River channel.

HPIM1812.jpg

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epicure3

(Gonzer @ Jan. 16 2007,08:25)

QUOTE
Not sure why my lutescens got a suntan while a baronii 10' away was untouched. 5 miles inland, San Luis Ray River channel.

HPIM1812.jpg

Lutescens in less cold hardy than baronii.

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Kim

Lowest low, 31.  Dense clump planted on north side of masonry fence, highest frond reaching 7'.  No new damage (one frond has some curled tips, but I think it was there already).

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elHoagie

30F (first night) - no damage

27F (second night) - no damage

clump 2m (6ft) tall

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epicure3

(elHoagie @ Jan. 16 2007,13:40)

QUOTE
30F (first night) - no damage

27F (second night) - no damage

clump 2m (6ft) tall

Nice job, Jack. were they out in the open?

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LJG

Off topic, but Gonzer, your lutescens has some great color! Maybe it was the lighting, but it has a lot of white, yellow and orange. Mine looks nothing like yours.

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Gonzer

It's a nice one LJ, especially the trunk. It should be fine. One thing positive out of this is that it was one hell of barometer for cold-hardiness!

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Hollywood Palms

3 clumps, no frost, no damage 32 degrees.

David

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elHoagie

(epicure3 @ Jan. 16 2007,10:48)

QUOTE

(elHoagie @ Jan. 16 2007,13:40)

QUOTE
30F (first night) - no damage

27F (second night) - no damage

clump 2m (6ft) tall

Nice job, Jack. were they out in the open?

Yeah, the clump has no overhead canopy, but it's right next to the east facing wall of my stucco house.  The clump is looking a little yellowish, but it had that look before the freeze...

I'll have to check in a few days to make sure no damage "develops".

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Geoff

27F 5 hours no frost turned most leave a brownish, except newly opening leaf on my seedling in corner of wall about 5' tall overall.

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DoomsDave

Some came through four nights of 28-29 F pretty well:

post-208-1170025557_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

Others not so good.

This one was further downslope from the one pictured before.

Still, not too bad.

post-208-1170025600_thumb.jpg

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Scott

My little Dypsis Lutescens is definitely worse for wear. It was hangin' out under the overhang with some others,  and some of it's leaves are frazzled. But after 80MPH winds in Dec., and then 25F I'd look frazzled too. I guess it'll be okay

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epicure3

(epicure3 @ Jan. 15 2007,22:14)

QUOTE
Low of 29. no frost

Largest clump with fronds about 10 feet in the air. Freeze damage to the highest frond only. The rest of this one seems ok.

1 other smallish clump untouched even in the coldest part of the yard in shade.

4 other clumps are canopy protected and I haven't seen them yet.

Update....

2 highest damaged (now dead) fronds on 10' stem cut off and the newest frond has opened. 4 clumps that are on my slope undamaged and growing nicely.

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ruskinPalms

Went below 32F at 330am, went back above 32F by 830am. 5 total hours of freezing temperatures. Ultimate low of 29.7F with 7.6 "freezing degree hours" calculated as discussed in the weather forum. Moderate winds varying from NNW to NNE all night, dewpoints in low teens, no frost. No overhead canopy in my yard. No protection provided. Photos from 4 days after the freeze event.

Variable damage, but mimimal in general.

South side of house:

IMG_4122Large.jpg

South side of yard:

IMG_4127Large.jpg

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ruskinPalms

Northwest corner of house:

IMG_4162Custom.jpg

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osideterry

Man these are wimps. I have 2 clumps, about 5-6ft tall, that look almost as bad after experiencing 29-31F a couple times as they did from last years freeze of 25-26F. About 33% bronzing of leaves. Similar to Bill's first 2 photos.

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Dave-Vero

A big clump in a neighbor's yard has burned upper leaves after a night from about 9:30 pm to 6 am hovering near 32 degrees, followed by a drop to 30 degrees at dawn. My Satakentia liukiuensis suffered similar burn on a few leaves, while Archontophoenix tuckeri, A. cunninghamiana, Dypsis decaryi, Thrinax radiata, Coccothrinax spp., and assorted others were untouched.

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

Hello all! I'm brand new to the PalmTalk forums, and this is my first post! I'm sure glad I found this!

Regarding Dypsis Lutescens: I live in Golden Gate Estates which is due directly east of Naples, FL. This area is clearly marked zone 10A on the USDA map, however on the night of Jan. 21 to the morning of the 22nd I had a reading of 27F in my yard, along with heavy frost. :angry: The official reading for Golden Gate Estates was later announced as 27F from the Naples Daily News. I'm not positive on how long it dropped below 32, but when I came home from work that afternoon all 108 clumps of my Arecas had significant damage. I would say 90% of the foliage turned some shade of brown. Fast forward to right now (Feb 6th), and it seems that most of the stalks will be OK, and that the damage was mostly aesthetic and that new fronds will eventually take over the dead. New growth from the spears are re-emerging, green, and do not pull out. The stalks themselves are still firm and not squishy.

The oldest of these Areca clumps have been established and fast-growing for at least 17 months. The youngest have only been in the ground for 2 months, and all of them started as 3-gallon plantings. Luckily, the youngest of them show a lighter shade of brown as I believe they were partially protected by the wooded area they stand in front of. All of the damage to the clumps tended to be towards the top--- younger stalks and fronds beneath kept their healthy green color!

All in all, I pray that this wall of 108 Areca clusters did not suffer any fatal blows, as I planted them to provide an impenatratable fence of palms. If they prove to be able to survive what could be hours of sub-freezing temps AND frost in this area near Naples, FL, then I believe they will have survived what could be a worst-case scenario for the Naples area! AKA a 100 year event.

I would really like to post pictures of this now brown fence, in the hopes of getting feedback, and for others to learn. :rolleyes:

P.S. - Other plantings in my yard such as Hibiscus trees, Bougainvillea vines, crotons, Coconuts, etc. all suffered serious damage in this freeze event. I called two different nursies about the last time this happened and what to expect, and they said it hasn't reached this temp near Naples since 1989. Also, the city of Naples itself did not freeze that night because of their proximity to the Gulf. I myself live 18 miles inland as the crow flies.

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Paul The Palm Doctor!
Hello all! I'm brand new to the PalmTalk forums, and this is my first post! I'm sure glad I found this!

Regarding Dypsis Lutescens: I live in Golden Gate Estates which is due directly east of Naples, FL. This area is clearly marked zone 10A on the USDA map, however on the night of Jan. 21 to the morning of the 22nd I had a reading of 27F in my yard, along with heavy frost. :angry: The official reading for Golden Gate Estates was later announced as 27F from the Naples Daily News. I'm not positive on how long it dropped below 32, but when I came home from work that afternoon all 108 clumps of my Arecas had significant damage. I would say 90% of the foliage turned some shade of brown. Fast forward to right now (Feb 6th), and it seems that most of the stalks will be OK, and that the damage was mostly aesthetic and that new fronds will eventually take over the dead. New growth from the spears are re-emerging, green, and do not pull out. The stalks themselves are still firm and not squishy.

The oldest of these Areca clumps have been established and fast-growing for at least 17 months. The youngest have only been in the ground for 2 months, and all of them started as 3-gallon plantings. Luckily, the youngest of them show a lighter shade of brown as I believe they were partially protected by the wooded area they stand in front of. All of the damage to the clumps tended to be towards the top--- younger stalks and fronds beneath kept their healthy green color!

All in all, I pray that this wall of 108 Areca clusters did not suffer any fatal blows, as I planted them to provide an impenatratable fence of palms. If they prove to be able to survive what could be hours of sub-freezing temps AND frost in this area near Naples, FL, then I believe they will have survived what could be a worst-case scenario for the Naples area! AKA a 100 year event.

I would really like to post pictures of this now brown fence, in the hopes of getting feedback, and for others to learn. :rolleyes:

P.S. - Other plantings in my yard such as Hibiscus trees, Bougainvillea vines, crotons, Coconuts, etc. all suffered serious damage in this freeze event. I called two different nursies about the last time this happened and what to expect, and they said it hasn't reached this temp near Naples since 1989. Also, the city of Naples itself did not freeze that night because of their proximity to the Gulf. I myself live 18 miles inland as the crow flies.

WELCOME, Mike!!

Golden Gate usually is cooler than near U.S. 41 or west but this freeze event was a bit different in that there was a pretty short windless period. That mixes the air more than on our cold & calm winds nights. I think that you probably received some of the air that Immokalee received, and I believe, that this town was also about 27 F.

You're probably right, this was an "epic" freeze that won't soon be repeated.

Again, Mike, welcome to Palm Talk!

Paul

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SunnyFl
Hello all! I'm brand new to the PalmTalk forums, and this is my first post! I'm sure glad I found this!

Regarding Dypsis Lutescens: I live in Golden Gate Estates which is due directly east of Naples, FL. This area is clearly marked zone 10A on the USDA map, however on the night of Jan. 21 to the morning of the 22nd I had a reading of 27F in my yard, along with heavy frost. :angry: The official reading for Golden Gate Estates was later announced as 27F from the Naples Daily News. I'm not positive on how long it dropped below 32, but when I came home from work that afternoon all 108 clumps of my Arecas had significant damage. I would say 90% of the foliage turned some shade of brown. Fast forward to right now (Feb 6th), and it seems that most of the stalks will be OK, and that the damage was mostly aesthetic and that new fronds will eventually take over the dead. New growth from the spears are re-emerging, green, and do not pull out. The stalks themselves are still firm and not squishy.

Hi Mike!

What a shame to have so many beautiful lutescens damaged like that. Must have really hurt to see those brown fronds. It's good that you're not going give up on them - they grow so fast that they'll outgrow the damage soon. But this is just unreal, and hard to imagine Golden Gate Estates having such a freeze. 27F! That's bad.

Slightly OT - you mentioned area nurseries. Have you been to Driftwood Garden? We got our Pandanus there.

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falcon1988

Hello all! I'm brand new to the PalmTalk forums, and this is my first post! I'm sure glad I found this!

Regarding Dypsis Lutescens: I live in Golden Gate Estates which is due directly east of Naples, FL. This area is clearly marked zone 10A on the USDA map, however on the night of Jan. 21 to the morning of the 22nd I had a reading of 27F in my yard, along with heavy frost. :angry: The official reading for Golden Gate Estates was later announced as 27F from the Naples Daily News. I'm not positive on how long it dropped below 32, but when I came home from work that afternoon all 108 clumps of my Arecas had significant damage. I would say 90% of the foliage turned some shade of brown. Fast forward to right now (Feb 6th), and it seems that most of the stalks will be OK, and that the damage was mostly aesthetic and that new fronds will eventually take over the dead. New growth from the spears are re-emerging, green, and do not pull out. The stalks themselves are still firm and not squishy.

Hi Mike and welcome to palmtalk, well I think everyone got some short of damage to this event and its hard to see that trust me i know my lutescens has some frost burn mostly at the tips

and the top fronds and its plant right by the house which helped some but frost is the major problem but they do recover pretty darn fast as sunny said the best is to keep it watered and let nature take

its course with TLC and with the sun's love it will be in no time a beautiful palm hope it recover fast for you.

Regards

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

Hello all! I appreciate your show of support! While I remain cautiously optimistic and continue to water, the first stalk pulled out without much resistance the other, which definitely concerns me. As I promised, here are some pictures of what they look like. :unsure:

post-3194-1234186141_thumb.jpg

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

These are some of the oldest in the row of clumps, one can definitely see the damage that was incurred. :unsure:

post-3194-1234186304_thumb.jpg

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

post-3194-1234186358_thumb.jpg

As you can see from this particular photo, there is a fair amount of greenery under every clump, and when I get in closer to check out the growing spears, new growth is definitely emerging from most stalks! :)

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

And finally, this is the row of the youngest trees which have only been in the ground for 2 months...

post-3194-1234186504_thumb.jpg

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DoomsDave

MIKE!

YIKE!

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Jeff in St Pete

Hi Mike and welcome to PalmTalk!

It looks like your D. lutescens had heavy frost damage. I think the older ones will survive and recover pretty quickly. Some of the youngest ones may not make it, but you can always replant easily if you lose any of those. Good luck and let us know how they do.

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

Great news everyone!! :) It seems that my long row of Dypsis Lutescens may make a full recovery. Following the 27F freeze that Golden Gate Estates (Naples) experienced the morning of Jan. 22nd, it is approximately 4 weeks later and almost all of the growing spears are sprouting new green spears with lightning speed! With as bad as the damage looked, it seems that if they can survive this blast of cold, I'm confident they will be able to survive just about anything (cold-wise). Hopefully we won't have to experience that again any time soon! :rolleyes:

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enigma99

I had two nights really cold this winter, one 27.3F and one 29F. Some got 50% leaf burn, and some got 20% leaf burn. I was surprised how hardy these palms are! I would like to point out that the palms that didn't get roasted from the 100F+ Summer temps had very little leaf burn, but those which were stressed from the summer heat didn't take the cold as well...

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Dreaming_of_Zone_15b

The great news continues everyone! It's now been several months since I first reported the bad frost that affect all my Dypsis Lutescens on January 21st. I recently have been giving them "haircuts" if you will to get rid of the dead fronds, and they all look magnificent underneith! Nothing but green growth. I'd say I've pulled out about 15 weak spears that were rotting, which is a very, VERY small percentage of them considering 108 clumps were affected. Well there you go folks, 27 degrees will give you grief with a zone 10 palm, but it is survivable. :)

P.S. - Neither of my baby Coconut trees survived the blast. :unsure:

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Keith in SoJax

Mine survived in pot here in Jacksonville, FL. All of the old canes died. It pretty much looks like total crap even 4 months later. On the upside, it'll be easier to roll into the garage this year.

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enigma99
Mine survived in pot here in Jacksonville, FL. All of the old canes died. It pretty much looks like total crap even 4 months later. On the upside, it'll be easier to roll into the garage this year.

27F followed by 25F the next night. Just needed top trimming:) Although, it was by a window

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