Jump to content
quaman58

Becarriophoenix "windows"

Recommended Posts

quaman58

Took 26F and had 3 or 4 leaves burn moderately, but the rest were untouched. 6 ft. plant, 3 years in the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tikitiki

32f no frost no problem. 2nd night same temp but with frost and it is showing some light browning of the leaves. Seven feet OA

Edited by tikitiki

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
falcon1988

2nd nite in the mid 30's first night no sign of any damage however the 2 nite with light frost showing up

some browning say about 2% only 2 leafs is showing the lite browning the rest is unharmed. the plant is

about 2/3 feet give or take and its about 2 years in the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JEFF IN MODESTO

All of mine were toasted this winter at 28f.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
osideterry

Jeff - Toasted as in dead, or the leaves are brown but they are pushing new spears?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

I have two Floribunda b. "windows", one in the cold part of the garden and one in the warm thermal belt in the garden. Both sailed through the freeze without a trace of damage. The one in the lower garden got exposed to 26F on the lowest night, with 5 total nights of freezing temperatures, 10 hours per night, with overhead canopy. Damage nearby included damage to a bird of paradise that was under canopy as well. 26F was accurate at 6 feet out in the open about 30 feet elevation higher up the hill, so 26F under canopy at that location is reasonable. The one in the upper garden looks perfect, but it only got exposed to 31F.

I may not have enough Summer heat to grow these anyway, and too much Winter chill, but this is a tough plant when it comes to freezing temperatures. Given what I know about Winter yellowing due to sun, I suspect that if this palm can get some Summer sun and Winter shade in Socal, it should do well. Here in Central Calif. I still think it won't work even if it survives this Winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

I am thinking of trying one of these. Might be able to put my hands on one very soon. But these reports aren't too encouraging for Zone 9a.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

I am thinking of trying one of these. Might be able to put my hands on one very soon. But these reports aren't too encouraging for Zone 9a.

IMO, based on my own experience with Becariophoenix Mad. windows, it would be an exercise in futility to try and grow one in zone 9a. I had a nice one. Lasted about two years in the ground before a freeze killed it. Further, I had it planted in a protected (semi-treed area). The one thing I don't remember is just what my low temperature was and the duration time below 32 degrees F that ultimately killed my palm.

I have a windowless form in the ground, but it's only went through one winter (last winter, that was mild and didn't drop below 32 degrees), plus I have it growing beneath the canopy of a carrotwood tree. My Beca. is still small enough that I can protect it with supplemental heat and coverings, which I will probably do if a freeze is forecasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

Brett's beccariophoenix supposedly made it through the 2007 freeze unscathed, as did another one in someone else's garden. I don't think it's a 9a palm, but once it's gained some size, it's probably an upper 9b/ cool 10a palm. I'd rate it similar in hardiness to kentiopsis oliviformis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brahea Axel

Update: the beccariophoenix 'windows' on the bottom of the hill under canopy finally gave up the ghost. All leaves wilted, spear pulled, definitely rotting. Tossed it on the compost pile. The last specimen on top of the hill still going strong.

I still think this is a hardy palm, but it needs warm Winter nights >50F to recover. It's got very little chill tolerance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zeeth

3.5 hours below freezing, absolute low of 28.7˚ F. Nearby B. afredii are undamaged.

IMG_0652.thumb.jpg.94fdeb1f59c21a188b184

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy Loam

So, is it fair to say that this palm (beccariophoenix fenestralis, aka "windows") is the least cold-hardy of the beccariophoenix species in common cultivation?  Is it reasonable to say that the hardiest of all is beccariophoenix alfredii, followed closely by beccariophoenix madagascariensis (aka "no windows"), with beccariophoenix fenestralis in absolute last place?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt
On 12/24/2013, 6:15:27, Walt said:

 

IMO, based on my own experience with Becariophoenix Mad. windows, it would be an exercise in futility to try and grow one in zone 9a. I had a nice one. Lasted about two years in the ground before a freeze killed it. Further, I had it planted in a protected (semi-treed area). The one thing I don't remember is just what my low temperature was and the duration time below 32 degrees F that ultimately killed my palm.

 

I have a windowless form in the ground, but it's only went through one winter (last winter, that was mild and didn't drop below 32 degrees), plus I have it growing beneath the canopy of a carrotwood tree. My Beca. is still small enough that I can protect it with supplemental heat and coverings, which I will probably do if a freeze is forecasted.

Following up on my post above (12/24/13), my Bec. mad. windowless palm (planted under carrotwood tree canopy) went through the winters of 2014 through 2018 unscathed. My two Bec. alfredi have never had a hint of damage. I just five weeks ago bought another Bec. fenestralis. It was in somewhat rattty condition, so I re potted it and will continue to pot grow it until it starts looking good again before planting it in ground. This time I will plant it in a location where I can protect it in the event of a severe cold snap.

When I lost my last Bec. fenestralis, it wasn't totally defoliated by any means, but after a period of weeks, maybe months, it collapsed. In the future I don't plan on trying to protect the entire palm, only thee meristem and trunk/stem. Doing so will require far less protection effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...