Jump to content
Alberto

First frost from down under -Paraná-South Brazil

Recommended Posts

Alberto

Four weeks ago (27 to 30 june) we had our first freezes of the year. According SIMEPAR metereology the monday morning would be cloudy so frostless. I was horrorzed when I woke up and saw the cloudless sky. Min temp of -3°C near the house and -4.2°C at ground level were this pic was taken the following morning (Tuesday) IAll my young and tender palms weren´t covered and I fear that some will beat the dust!

One of my Butia x Parajubaeas (june28). See the lack of frost below the palm (canopy effect)

post-465-099900600 1311639997_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Young silver Serenoas were covered the second night. They speer pulled two years ago.

post-465-010004100 1311640497_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Frosted Trachicarpus latisectus

post-465-011483200 1311640651_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Trachicarpus wagnerianus

post-465-084330600 1311640739_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Young CIDP

post-465-077550100 1311640837_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
krishnaraoji88

Wow that is some heavy frost!

-Krishna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

Young CIDP

I was surprised it got so cold (and frosty) at your location, but then I saw that you are at 1,030 meters altitude. That should account, I would think, for maybe 4-5 degrees C colder in nightime low temperatures compared to at sea level at your latitude.

I'm surprised you had spear pull two years ago on silver Serenoa, unless it was colder than the low temperatures you had in June (Of course, there could be other factors at play). I say this as I have about 20 silver Serenoa repens in the ground and they all saw lows of -4 to -6 degrees C this past winter on three separate nights, and none of the spears pulled (to my knowledge). Same goes for the green form of Serenoa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

I don´t know the reason why the young Serenoas spear pulled 2 years ago..

Maybe the high humidity.....Generally every freeze here is preceeded by heavy rain....

I thought they were bullet proof so I didn´t cover the young palms two years ago. (not sure how cold it was at ground level)

In Santa Catarina State some places reached -7°C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rafael

I am 7 mts above sea level. Get yearly minimums of 26 F, with a couple of heavy frost mornings. Thrithrinax acanthocoma had spear pulled as also :S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

I am 7 mts above sea level. Get yearly minimums of 26 F, with a couple of heavy frost mornings. Thrithrinax acanthocoma had spear pulled as also :S

I think a lot of hardy palms are sensitive to speer pull when very young. In Nature the seedlings are less exposed then ours in the garden,methinks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nigel

In Santa Catarina State some places reached -7°C

Alberto, I noticed that that all the Cyatheas in the mountains of SC look dead. Do they recover or do they have to grow from the ground again from seed ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

In Santa Catarina State some places reached -7°C

Alberto, I noticed that that all the Cyatheas in the mountains of SC look dead. Do they recover or do they have to grow from the ground again from seed ?

Probably only the aerial parts are dead.....they will sprout in spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ampli

Hi Alberto, I can't believe you had a so cold night in Brazil!!!

Your garden looks like mine in December, when I had a low of -7°C. But I think the day temperature rise-up more quickly in Brazil than in Italy.

What's your high temperature the day after the frost.?

Here I had a max teperature of 2°C after the frost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

The days after a freezing night are very sunny and dry ,so temperature are generally 10-13°C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

This was the look of my 6 Beccariophoenix alfredii that were exposed to frost. Only some green in central fronds and speerpulled.The ones that have some canopy are fine

post-465-071210200 1311717785_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Cut all the dead fronds.Removed the dead speer and drenched the hole with Água Oxigenada 10 %.

I´m not so hopefull but fingers crossed.....

post-465-018332100 1311718273_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

This B.alfredii is growing at the side of the araucaria forest. It´s unfazed!

post-465-048616600 1311718582_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

The ´´Urbenville bangalow´´growing nearby, with the same exposition to the sky as the B.alfredii, show some damage.

The Urbenville´s with 100% canopy are OK

post-465-054973600 1311718760_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Difference of hardiness of P .roebellenii (right) and P.rupicola left. Definately : rupicolas are hardier!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

3 Phoenix roebellenii. Totally burned ,but will regrow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

3 Phoenix roebellenii. Totally burned ,but will regrow!

post-465-021961900 1311719169_thumb.jpg

post-465-016797800 1311719345_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

I'm reluctant to plant out cold tender palms at that size, even in a sheltered location, because all other things being equal, at that size they can't take as low temperature and duration of temperature as a more mature size.

If I must plant them out at that size, then I will be prepared to protect them. By protection I mean total enclosure with supplemental heat. Just a crude tent that can capture rising ground heat, even without supplemental heat, should keep temperatures up maybe 2 degree C as opposed to no tent. Further, it should definitely help mitigate frost formation.

As a result of the coldest December (average temperature and even all-time low temperature) I've ever experienced in the 13 plus years I've lived at my current location, I lost lots of relatively cold tender palms, many with a 1-1/2 meters of trunk, to include A. cunninghamiana, A. alexandrae, Wodyetia bifurcata, Ravenea rivularis et al. However, these palms were exposed, whereas these same species in the more sheltered areas of my property were only cosmetically damaged. But a few of these palms, I believe, were seriously cold damaged as their growth rate has slowed down to 1/8 their normal speed, a sure sign of tramatic meristem damage (and possibly trunk damage).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Young P.rupicola below some light canopy.

post-465-077834400 1311719638_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

The 5 Parajubaea Torallyi var.tor. that speerpulled two years ago,recovered fine,were protected last winter (june / july 2010) and look fine this year after the freeze.

This TOPIC was about the speerpull of the same tortors two years ago:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=19453&st=0&p=324273&hl=+se%20+arrependimento&fromsearch=1&#entry324273

post-465-092309100 1311720152_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

My 6 D.decipiens looks all OK .The biggest of the six and another tinier plant.

post-465-025218800 1311720829_thumb.jpg

post-465-042340000 1311720973_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

First: burned Ravenea xerophylla(open position) and second pristine R.glauca below canopy

post-465-051958400 1311721187_thumb.jpg

post-465-056074000 1311721367_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

First and second pic: T. martianus Khasia hills.

Third pic: T. martianus Nepal (younger palm) undamaged with same exposition.

post-465-012158300 1311721583_thumb.jpg

post-465-041703900 1311721669_thumb.jpg

post-465-009353900 1311721803_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walter John

Four weeks ago (27 to 30 june) we had our first freezes of the year. According SIMEPAR metereology the monday morning would be cloudy so frostless. I was horrorzed when I woke up and saw the cloudless sky. Min temp of -3°C near the house and -4.2°C at ground level were this pic was taken the following morning (Tuesday) IAll my young and tender palms weren´t covered and I fear that some will beat the dust!

One of my Butia x Parajubaeas (june28). See the lack of frost below the palm (canopy effect)

I too am amazed to see the frost and never expect anywhere in Brazil to get frost, that is my ignorance, very similar to how people perceive Australia sometimes.

Now being the good samaritan that I am Alberto, I am going to help you with some of the english you have written here. This is so you know in future, okay ?. I thought you might appreciate this, just helping out, because you post really great threads on the board and we love to hear from you.

"horrorzed" should be spelt "horrified"

For "beat the dust!", the correct saying is "bite the dust".

Cheers brother and good luck with the recovery for your palms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

I only have one Phoenix rupicola palm, and it got frost burned. However, it's a fairly fast grower of new fronds, as shown in the second photo below.

Note: The date stamp (year) in the first photo is wrong, it should be 2011.

Phoenixrupicola.jpg

Phoenixrupicola7-16-11.jpg

Edited by Walt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

I take my hat off to everyone who grows their tender palms in frosty areas. I just don't know if I could handle seeing my palms getting burnt like that every year or so. All the best Alberto and I hope you get a real 10 out 10 summer for growth this year.

Best regards

Tyrone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

First pic:big Livistona chinensis Below canopy

Second :L.chinensis exposed. Interesting that only the hanging filaments burns in freezes and the rest of the leaves not......(?)

post-465-015167400 1311722013_thumb.jpg

post-465-012691300 1311722141_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

"horrorzed" should be spelt "horrified"

For "beat the dust!", the correct saying is "bite the dust".

Cheers brother and good luck with the recovery for your palms.

[/quote

Thanks for the English lesson!!! :-) Sometimes I only see my errors when I read the post the following day.

Please correct me when you find errors! This would not be difficult :-) Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

First pic:Burned D. albofarinosa and D.onilahensis :waiting for the canopy...:-) Brahea brandegei is OK of course!

Halve of the X Cycas sp below canopy is green!

Caryotoa gigas: is it alive?

post-465-045021900 1311723997_thumb.jpg

post-465-083430500 1311724161_thumb.jpg

post-465-051659900 1311724289_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Syagrus cardenasii: they don´t look that happy!

Second pic: Arenga engleri show some cosmetic damage.

post-465-098122000 1311724476_thumb.jpg

post-465-080815600 1311724627_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

First pic: Young T. latisectus with some minor damage. Mature plants are OK.

Second pic: D.onilahensis near the house opening a new frond

post-465-081046600 1311724936_thumb.jpg

post-465-020367400 1311725076_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Thanks Walt and Tyrone!

Walt ,it´s strange that your Accoelorraphe wrighttii (paurotis) is totally green and your P.rupicola at the same spot is burned.

My paurotis palms all show some burned leaves and P.rupicolas less then yours...Go figure...?????

Tomorrow I´ll show the difference between native tableland queen from Paraná and a palm from seeds from São Paulo State.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gileno Machado

Oi Alberto,

I saw on the news here the reports on the low temps and frosts (geadas) down in the South and thought about your garden. It seems the weather prediction guys need some vacations in Paraná... Anyway, all your palms have grown up a lot since i last saw pix of them. Condolences on the casualties but I guess most of them will gradually recover when spring comes, hopefully soon. I see a lot of Dioon edule...they seem to be from a very cold hardy variety, hmm? How did the northern Acrocomia and Encephalartos face this Argentinean blast? and the Trithrinax campestris? BTW, lovely Trachy wagnerianus...I should send mine here to your place...

Abraços...and heres the Butia x Jubaea strap leaf seedling you gave me at the biennial, remember? How's the mother plant doing?

post-157-039740700 1311727217_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Walt

Thanks Walt and Tyrone!

Walt ,it´s strange that your Accoelorraphe wrighttii (paurotis) is totally green and your P.rupicola at the same spot is burned.

My paurotis palms all show some burned leaves and P.rupicolas less then yours...Go figure...?????

Tomorrow I´ll show the difference between native tableland queen from Paraná and a palm from seeds from São Paulo State.

Alberto: My paurotis palm did get some burn on the most exposed fronds. However, about a week ago I gave the entire clump a hard trim, removing all of the burned fronds. But note, since last winter my paurotis regrew lots of new fronds, so my palm looks full. However, my paurotis palm wasn't nearly as frost burned as my P.rupicola.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Walt,normally I cover my young palms the first winters (sometimes with some heat) but this time I believed the site of the meterology station that said the frost would happen only on the follwing morning......

Gileno your Butia eriospatha X Jubaea looks fantastic! I hope the eriospatha genes will make it more suitable for your tropical climate!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
krishnaraoji88

First pic:Burned D. albofarinosa and D.onilahensis :waiting for the canopy...:-) Brahea brandegei is OK of course!

Halve of the X Cycas sp below canopy is green!

Caryotoa gigas: is it alive?

Caryota have been good about coming back from total defoliation for me.

-krishna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...