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spockvr6

Hibiscus tiliaceus variegated

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spockvr6

This is another good small tree/shrub to add color to a palm garden.  And, as a bonus, it grows pretty fast and flowers (as it is a Hibiscus).

Heres a photo from May 21, 2006 and then January 6, 2007.  Its a good thing my neighbor likes such plantings as half of it is spilling into his yard :D

May 21, 2006

Hibiscus-May212006.jpg

January 6, 2007

Hibiscus-January62007.jpg

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SunnyFl

Very nice!  That's a great shrub - and it gets big.  Selby has a very large one.

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spockvr6

Sunny -

Mine came in standardized form, but I decided to let it shrub back out.  But, I think I might start standardizing it back again and give it a more tree like form.  But, Ill wait till spring to do so.  I wont be able to let mine get completely huge though...just dont have the space :(

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Kris

Dear Spockvr6  :)

those verigated hibiscus are fentastic.and the second

one i have that in my garden.

love,

Kris.

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spockvr6

Kris-

Have you seen the green form also?  I tend to like the variegated a bit better (since it is rarer), but the green is also very nice.  I see them growing pretty much wild all over the place around here.  At first, they look like Seagrapes, but closer inspection reveals them to be the "Sea Hibiscus", or H. tiliaceus.

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Kris

Dear Spockvr6  :)

hey i must tell you that my mom had tried all most

all varities avaliable in s.india.but there were the following

coloured flowers_white,cream double,pinkdouble,colour

changing flower etc..and some where called as the Jamican

hibiscus varities.but most of them perished due to red ants &

some white spongus growing on them.and iam very allergic to

ant powder,sprayers.so we were unable to give the needed

treatment to those beautiful varities_so they gradually leaves

started to droup and the stem began to dry-up.and in a span of

4 to 5 months there were only dried stick.

after this loss we have stoped adding new hibiscus varities into our garden.

at present only 3 have survived one is in a pot,one is in huge shrub & one verigated struggling to survive.

Love,

Kris.

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Jerry@TreeZoo

Does anyone now the ultiate size of the variegated variety?  The green one gets absolutely huge, like 150 wide!  I have never seen the variegated one bigger than about 15'X15'.  I have seen them maintained as a hedge at 2 feet high.

Jerry

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Dave-Vero

The variegated one looks nice, and looks likely to grow MUCH more slowly than the usual all-green version, which is usually frowned on or banned in communities with landscaping regulations.  It's capable of becoming invasive, not to mention it makes massive thickets.  Our city government just whacked someone's thicket so drivers could see a bit around a corner.  

Another clump-former, Sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera), can also be a serious handful and will periodically freeze back, but it's not going to get as out of hand as the green Hibiscus.  

By the way, for a shrub of tractable size, fast growth, and usability for sheltering shade-loving small palms, it's hard to go wrong with firebush, Hamelia patens.  Morikami Japanese Garden in Palm Beach County use it heavily, and they aren't afraid to prune the plants heavily.  If you have more space (or the willingness to prune ruthlessly through the growing season), Callicarpa americana is a ubiquitous native with spectacular purple fruit.  The IFAS training garden in Ft Pierce has shown that they respond well to very, very frequent pruning.  It's a big genus--there's even one species in the rain forest at La Selva, Costa Rica.  Doesn't look as pretty as ours.

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spockvr6

(Dave-Vero @ Jan. 07 2007,16:07)

QUOTE
The variegated one looks nice, and looks likely to grow MUCH more slowly than the usual all-green version, which is usually frowned on or banned in communities with landscaping regulations.  It's capable of becoming invasive, not to mention it makes massive thickets.  Our city government just whacked someone's thicket so drivers could see a bit around a corner.  

I will seocnd this thought.

There is a green form growing wild down the road from me in soem empty space near the road.  About 2 years ago, someone (the town most likely) completely hacked it to the ground.  It came back from the roots hard and as of today, its nearly 20 ft tall!  Of course, its far sparser than it was before being chopped down, but its still a very large shrub.

There are numerous others around town that have taken on gigantic proportions, which I didnt know was possible as I thought cold would set them back.  But, I think they are a little hardier than I expected.

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Zac in NC

I think I saw the Tricolor variety at Universal Studios Islands of Adventure back in October of 2002. It was amazing. Thanks for sharing the picture Larry.

Zac

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Dypsisdean

Here's a pic of a larger one growing in pure sand down by the beach.

post-11-1168672639_thumb.jpg

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Kris

Dear Dean  :)

thanks for that gigantic hibiscus plant still,

i have never ever seen anything like that

in my life time.

But one thing is becoming clearer that some plants

love certain soil & climate conditions of certain

countries.

Love,

Kris.

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