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Xenon

Your dream climatic averages...

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Xenon

Show us the climate of your dreams!

post-4112-065941200 1299348877_thumb.jpg

:) Jonathan

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BS Man about Palms

eerrr, ummm. How just using stats from Leilani Estates? :lol:

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palmsOrl

I would go for something like the windward (wet) side of the Big Island anywhere from Hilo to Volcano (Hilo is better for palm growing). If it was to be a temperate climate I would have a huge conservatory for all my palms, but for me I like seasons, so I would say:

July 60 F low / 84 F high

January 18 F low / 38 F high

Annual snowfall 25"

Annual rainfall 40"-50"

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Tassie_Troy1971

Well Lord Howe Island would be my first choice perfectly mild never cold usually between 71f - 82f all year .

Number 2 would be San Clemente - Laguna - Newport beach coast very mild summer, mild in winter and not too humid .

Third choice would be Kiama Nsw coast -Palm beach north of sydney very mild winters sunny and not overly hot in summer .

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amazondk

Jonathan,

Those numbers look somewhat like Manaus. The nightime is right. But, the daytimes are a bit cool. Here I would say the average high is from 88 to 92 F. And, we have a little bit more rain.

dk

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greekpalm

High temperatures 30 C

Low temperatures 20 C

temperature difference between cold and warm season 5C

somewhat irregular rainfall between seasons with rainfall between 300 and 500MM

and lots of sunshine

sounds like a compromise between my dream climate and preferable climate for most palms.

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displaced_floridian

For me, Hawaii has the most comfortable climate. Not as hot as FL in summer, not nearly as cold, most any palms will grow there. Here is a chart of the averages/extremes for Kapaau, HI, on the north side of the Big Island of Hawaii:

post-4141-047747600 1299518708_thumb.jpg

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displaced_floridian

Show us the climate of your dreams!

post-4112-065941200 1299348877_thumb.jpg

:) Jonathan

Where is that chart from, Jonathan? Looks too mild for FL, too warm for most of HI. Puerto Rico, maybe?

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Mandrew968

I'll take Miami summer, minus the winter and the people that are in a hurry--slow down, AMIGOS!!! B)

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sonoranfans

For most palms, it would probably be Puna on Big island, for me no thanks. My ideal would probably be in the central highlands of madagascar at about 1000m elevation. Somewhat to the west/southwest of the highest elevations will be a little drier, perhaps 40-45 inches of rain year and no frosts, but not too humid either. +100 inches of rain a year is not for me... Another area that could be nice would be on the west coast side of costa rica at around 7-8000' elevation.

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spockvr6
+100 inches of rain a year is not for me...

Im with you Tom. Id rather have 0" of rain a year and access to cheap water! Undoubtably not the same end result for palms as natural drenching rains, but sure alot better for outside activities.

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Trópico

Show us the climate of your dreams!

post-4112-065941200 1299348877_thumb.jpg

:) Jonathan

Where is that chart from, Jonathan? Looks too mild for FL, too warm for most of HI. Puerto Rico, maybe?

You're probably right. I grew up in the suburbs of San Juan, PR (Bayamón). The daytime/nighttime temperature swings were almost always 10°F due to the ocean influence. When I moved to Orlando, FL, the temperature swings of about 20°F felt unnatural. Here you can start the day wearing a jacket on a chilly morning and be sweating by mid-afternoon.

Hawaii looks very appealing with highs in the upper 70s, but mid 80s are still about right. I suppose palms will grow a bit slower in Hawaii as compared to a hotter location?

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sonoranfans

+100 inches of rain a year is not for me...

Im with you Tom. Id rather have 0" of rain a year and access to cheap water! Undoubtably not the same end result for palms as natural drenching rains, but sure alot better for outside activities.

After living in the desert for 10 years, I know what my favorite weather is :D . 75-95F highs with 10-20% relative humidity, with a pool its heaven. Dont get me wrong, I dont like the wicked hot summers at all :angry: , but I found Hawaii to be less comfortable than Arizona in mid october. If you want to do something active, the humidity stifles and stresses you. Right now in florida its OK,as good as it gets, as its dry and 75-80F. The surprise here for me is the dry springtime, I have to water alot to keep my palms happy. But summer will come and it will get sticky :( . At least we get sun almost every day, it rarely cloulds over for days at a time :( . I dont mind rain, but I want the sun to come out soon after, and I want the humidity to stay down. Funny,sounds like a northern california summer... :lol: I just cant see myself getting bled by california taxes that they whack new residents with, that could be more uncomfortable than the worst humidity. :lol:

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Bennz

I dream of N QLD as the ideal climate every winter when the days here struggle to hit 20C and nights can get down to below 5C on occaison. When I actually am in N QLD though, I start to dream of nice cool evenings. My conclusion is I'm probably just to contrary to have an ideal climate! Probably a climate hovering around 20C (warmer during day, cooler in evening) year around would suit me fine. Frost and snow is out of the question!

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trioderob

San Diego has the best weather.

unless you dont like 76F , light winds and low humidity all year long.

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displaced_floridian

San Diego has the best weather.

unless you dont like 76F , light winds and low humidity all year long.

San Diego has a nice climate if you like 50s and 60s, not so much if you like

70s and 80s.

post-4141-023369200 1299713971_thumb.jpg

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amazondk

Every once in a while a thread like this appears about best climate, or most tropical climate, etc. I guess it is really a personal matter. Since climate is only one aspect of where one lives. To many it is not the most important one. Hence a lot of people love to live in New York, London, or elsewhere that are no where near tropical. You also never hear too much form the Hawaiians on this subject. Although I live in one of the best possible climates for growing tropícal plants. Many people would not cope. And, since it is also not the USA many Americans would not adjust. There is a lot more to a place than the weather. I happen to do just fine where I am and never even think about the best climate issue. I do know that I do not want to spend the rest of my days cleaning sidewalks of snow and dealing with sub zero temperatures though.

dk

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trioderob

San Diego has the best weather.

unless you dont like 76F , light winds and low humidity all year long.

San Diego has a nice climate if you like 50s and 60s, not so much if you like

70s and 80s.

go 1 mile inland and its 70s all year long.

ask anyone who lives here.

Edited by trioderob

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paulgila

dewd,why do you say things like that,its just not true. :hmm:

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MattyB

I can do pretty much what I want to do and not get arrested. I'm rich. You're right, it does feel good.

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paulgila

wrong forum,matt.you are thinking of the "10 richest people in the world" thread.

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trioderob

I can do pretty much what I want to do and not get arrested. I'm rich. You're right, it does feel good.

Matt-

I am under the impression that you are some kind of celebrity.

is that a true statement ?

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paulgila

yes,he is:in his own mind...

where its always 70 degrees. :floor:

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happ

As far as human comfort I don't think one can match Mediterranean climates though for optimal palm growth, I think more humid and warmer climates are preferable. In the eastern foothills of Los Angeles the average winter maximum temps average around 70F\ 21.1C. Winter minimums are some of the warmest in California; near 50F\ 10C. When frost strikes regions much further south [like Florida and Texas] these areas of California never experience freezing temps. Summer maximums are a bit warm [near 90F\ 32.2C] but most afternoons see a nice onshore wind of cool air and night temps almost always drop into the 60's. Humidity is generally low except a for a few months [mostly July and August].

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Xenon

Show us the climate of your dreams!

post-4112-065941200 1299348877_thumb.jpg

:) Jonathan

Where is that chart from, Jonathan? Looks too mild for FL, too warm for most of HI. Puerto Rico, maybe?

Sorry for the late response...it's just my imagination :D

Jonathan

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Dypsisdean

As far as human comfort I don't think one can match Mediterranean climates though for optimal palm growth, I think more humid and warmer climates are preferable. In the eastern foothills of Los Angeles the average winter maximum temps average around 70F\ 21.1C. Winter minimums are some of the warmest in California; near 50F\ 10C. When frost strikes regions much further south [like Florida and Texas] these areas of California never experience freezing temps. Summer maximums are a bit warm [near 90F\ 32.2C] but most afternoons see a nice onshore wind of cool air and night temps almost always drop into the 60's. Humidity is generally low except a for a few months [mostly July and August].

Happ,

I would agree with you, but with one exception - I don't know how anything could be more comfortable than the slightly upslope tropics. Around 1000-1200 ft, at this latitude (20˚N), it is between 60˚- 80˚F virtually all the time - year round, night or day. No heat is necessary. No air conditioning is necessary. You are never cold or never hot any time of day or night at those elevations.

Max temps are misleading. A winter max of 76˚F in SoCal might mean it was over 70˚F for only 4 or 5 hours (while in the 40s at night), while a max of 76˚ here could mean it was over 70˚F from just after sunrise into the early evening - while cooling off just enough at night for a comfortable night's sleep. And at these temps the humidity is not uncomfortable. In fact, I find it more pleasant than the dryness of many Med climate zones - the plants sure do.

After 50 years in San Diego and 10 here, I don't find the comparison even close.

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ariscott

Most people can't handle Darwin heat (southerners... of course). I don't mind.... It is only unbearable between Sept-Nov. The a/c will be going most of the days - but after the monsoon arrives... it cools it down so significantly!! The dry season is nice & pleasant - not so much for plants. That is why we usually have influx of tourist escaping their winter. It is almost impossible to find accommodation during the dry season. At least I don't have to be cold EVER... well, till the minimum is below 20deg C :D

Regards, Ari :)

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Tropicgardener

I grew up in subtropical Brisbane, Queensland as a child but as an adult I have lived in Cool Temperate, Temperate, Wet Tropical, Arid (outback) Tropical.......but I would have to say that where I live now is probably the most pleasant climate that I have lived in.

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ariscott

I guess each to their own, Andrew.... Although I am VERY bias when it comes to Gladstone & the surrounding area :winkie:

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Manolitus

As long as it does NOT go below 65 F, I am good to go...........

Miami's winters are becoming unbearable :rage:

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Donald Sanders

As far as human comfort I don't think one can match Mediterranean climates though for optimal palm growth, I think more humid and warmer climates are preferable. In the eastern foothills of Los Angeles the average winter maximum temps average around 70F\ 21.1C. Winter minimums are some of the warmest in California; near 50F\ 10C. When frost strikes regions much further south [like Florida and Texas] these areas of California never experience freezing temps. Summer maximums are a bit warm [near 90F\ 32.2C] but most afternoons see a nice onshore wind of cool air and night temps almost always drop into the 60's. Humidity is generally low except a for a few months [mostly July and August].

Happ,

I would agree with you, but with one exception - I don't know how anything could be more comfortable than the slightly upslope tropics. Around 1000-1200 ft, at this latitude (20˚N), it is between 60˚- 80˚F virtually all the time - year round, night or day. No heat is necessary. No air conditioning is necessary. You are never cold or never hot any time of day or night at those elevations.

Max temps are misleading. A winter max of 76˚F in SoCal might mean it was over 70˚F for only 4 or 5 hours (while in the 40s at night), while a max of 76˚ here could mean it was over 70˚F from just after sunrise into the early evening - while cooling off just enough at night for a comfortable night's sleep. And at these temps the humidity is not uncomfortable. In fact, I find it more pleasant than the dryness of many Med climate zones - the plants sure do.

After 50 years in San Diego and 10 here, I don't find the comparison even close.

Aloha, I know it gets boring hearing how perfect the climate is here on the Big Island. It is true! Travel the world and you won't find more climate options than here. I live at 1500 ft and I agree with Dean completely. Don Sanders

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ariscott

I want to live on elevation but only in equatorial tropics. If you are too far away from the equator, it can still get too cold.

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Xenon

Happ,

I would agree with you, but with one exception - I don't know how anything could be more comfortable than the slightly upslope tropics. Around 1000-1200 ft, at this latitude (20˚N), it is between 60˚- 80˚F virtually all the time - year round, night or day. No heat is necessary. No air conditioning is necessary. You are never cold or never hot any time of day or night at those elevations.

Max temps are misleading. A winter max of 76˚F in SoCal might mean it was over 70˚F for only 4 or 5 hours (while in the 40s at night), while a max of 76˚ here could mean it was over 70˚F from just after sunrise into the early evening - while cooling off just enough at night for a comfortable night's sleep. And at these temps the humidity is not uncomfortable. In fact, I find it more pleasant than the dryness of many Med climate zones - the plants sure do.

After 50 years in San Diego and 10 here, I don't find the comparison even close.

Aloha, I know it gets boring hearing how perfect the climate is here on the Big Island. It is true! Travel the world and you won't find more climate options than here. I live at 1500 ft and I agree with Dean completely. Don Sanders

Dean & Don,

How cold does it get at your elevations? I'm guessing mid 50s?

Thanks,

:) Jonathan

Edited by Xenon

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Dypsisdean

Happ,

I would agree with you, but with one exception - I don't know how anything could be more comfortable than the slightly upslope tropics. Around 1000-1200 ft, at this latitude (20˚N), it is between 60˚- 80˚F virtually all the time - year round, night or day. No heat is necessary. No air conditioning is necessary. You are never cold or never hot any time of day or night at those elevations.

Max temps are misleading. A winter max of 76˚F in SoCal might mean it was over 70˚F for only 4 or 5 hours (while in the 40s at night), while a max of 76˚ here could mean it was over 70˚F from just after sunrise into the early evening - while cooling off just enough at night for a comfortable night's sleep. And at these temps the humidity is not uncomfortable. In fact, I find it more pleasant than the dryness of many Med climate zones - the plants sure do.

After 50 years in San Diego and 10 here, I don't find the comparison even close.

Aloha, I know it gets boring hearing how perfect the climate is here on the Big Island. It is true! Travel the world and you won't find more climate options than here. I live at 1500 ft and I agree with Dean completely. Don Sanders

Dean & Don,

How cold does it get at your elevations? I'm guessing mid 50s?

Thanks,

:) Jonathan

Yes Jonathan,

That is pretty much the case. I am at 2200 ft elevation and it gets into the low 50s consistently in Jan. A little colder than I like, but it yields more rain - something important on the Kona side of the Big Island.

But the min. temps are as misleading as the max. temps are in my explanation above. They are only there for a short period of time. If it bottoms out at 55˚F, it will only be below 60˚F for a few short hours.

I have posted this link before. It is a friend of mine who has this online weather station. It has yearly graphs of temps, etc. I think he is around 1300ft. You'll notice he gets under 60˚F for only brief periods during the dead of winter. And over 80˚F even less frequently.

http://www.turquoise.net/~cmoss/weather/Current_Vantage_Pro.htm

Here's the yearly temp graph.

post-11-064565500 1300049838_thumb.jpg

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Xenon

Yes Jonathan,

That is pretty much the case. I am at 2200 ft elevation and it gets into the low 50s consistently in Jan. A little colder than I like, but it yields more rain - something important on the Kona side of the Big Island.

But the min. temps are as misleading as the max. temps are in my explanation above. They are only there for a short period of time. If it bottoms out at 55˚F, it will only be below 60˚F for a few hours.

I have posted this link before. It is a friend of mine who has this online weather station. It has yearly graphs of temps, etc. I think he is around 1300ft. You'll notice he gets under 60˚F for only brief periods during the dead of winter. And over 80˚F even less frequently.

http://www.turquoise...Vantage_Pro.htm

Here's the yearly temp graph.

Thank you for the detailed explanation.

:) Jonathan

Edited by Xenon

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spockvr6

I would agree with you, but with one exception - I don't know how anything could be more comfortable than the slightly upslope tropics. Around 1000-1200 ft, at this latitude (20˚N), it is between 60˚- 80˚F virtually all the time - year round, night or day. No heat is necessary. No air conditioning is necessary. You are never cold or never hot any time of day or night at those elevations.

Dean-

You would need to meet my wife! Ill come home and the heat will be on in the house and its 70F outside!

Our house doesnt seem to change temp more than 2F (72-74F) all year long, no matter what the outside temp is.

What I am trying to ascertain is at what temperature she needs to go from heat to cooling. There appears to be nothing in between! LOL

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sarasota alex

Most people may think that I'm some kind of a freak, but I actually enjoy being outside during the summer here in Florida.

I've never been to Hawaii, but the best climate I've experienced was the kind they have in San Jose, Costa Rica.

I doubt I will ever move from Sarasota though. All I need here is a property large enough to grow everything I want. On that property I would need a heated greenhouse, tall enough to fit an adult Iriartea and a coolhouse with reduced air pressure, tall enough to fit a grown Ceroxylon. Yeah, I think that's about it.

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Tropicgardener

I guess each to their own, Andrew.... Although I am VERY bias when it comes to Gladstone & the surrounding area :winkie:

I don't live in Gladstone Ari.........I don't really like the place either due to the industrial nature of the place, here is much different.....much, much nicer. Have lived in many places and climates in my time but just love it here. More even rainfall would be nice but I can live with dry periods.

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Moderate Heat and humidity the year around. Light showers that last less than one afteroon per week.

Highs in the middle 70's , lows in the low to mid 60's.... dewpoints in the low to mid 60's year round..

Im thinking Lanai City, Hawaii?

Jeff

Edited by Jeff in Modesto

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Most people may think that I'm some kind of a freak, but I actually enjoy being outside during the summer here in Florida.

I've never been to Hawaii, but the best climate I've experienced was the kind they have in San Jose, Costa Rica.

I doubt I will ever move from Sarasota though. All I need here is a property large enough to grow everything I want. On that property I would need a heated greenhouse, tall enough to fit an adult Iriartea and a coolhouse with reduced air pressure, tall enough to fit a grown Ceroxylon. Yeah, I think that's about it.

NoWay..... Summers in Florida are way to hot for me! Dewpoints in the 80's Even the beaches arent refreshing..

BTW ...Were do all them little bitting bugs come from???

We have non of them in Cali

Jeff

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